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Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(August 30, 1898 – October 16, 1992) was an American stage, film, radio and television actress. Primarily a theater actress, Booth began her career on Broadway in 1925. Her most significant success was as Lola Delaney, in the drama Come Back, Little Sheba, for which she received her first Tony Award in 1950 (she would go on to win two more). She made her film debut, reprising her role in the 1952 film version, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress
Academy Award for Best Actress
and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress for her performance. Despite her successful entry into films, she preferred acting on the stage, and made only four more films. From 1961 until 1966, she played the title role in the sitcom Hazel, for which she won two Primetime Emmy Awards. She was later acclaimed for her performance in the 1966 television production of The Glass Menagerie. Her final role was that of
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Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
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CBS
CBS
CBS
(an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language
English language
commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation. The company is headquartered at the CBS Building
CBS Building
in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS
CBS
Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS
CBS
Television City and the CBS
CBS
Studio Center). CBS
CBS
is sometimes referred to as the "Eye Network", in reference to the company's iconic logo, in use since 1951. It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of CBS programming during the tenure of William S
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Theatre In Pittsburgh
AlleghenyHistoric empires France Great BritainHistoric colonies New France Quebec VirginiaFounded November 27, 1758Municipal incorporation April 22, 1794 (Borough) March 18, 1816 (City)Founded by George Washington, General John ForbesNamed for "The Great Commoner": Prime Minister William PittGovernment • Type Mayor-Council • Mayor Bill Peduto
Bill Peduto
(D) •  City
City
CouncilCouncilmembersDarlene Harris Theresa Kail-Smith Bruce Kraus (President) Anthony Coghill Corey O'Connor Daniel Lavelle Deborah Gross Dan Gilman Rev. Ricky Burgess • State HouseRepresentativesJake Wheatley Don Walko Dominic Costa Chelsa Wagner Dan Frankel Joseph Preston, Jr. Dan Deasy Paul Costa Harry Readshaw • State Senate Wayne D. Fontana
Wayne D

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Stage Play
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as university or school productions. There are rare dramatists, notably George Bernard Shaw, who have had little preference as to whether their plays were performed or read
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Humphrey Bogart
Humphrey DeForest Bogart (/ˈboʊɡɑːrt/;[1] December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957)[2][3] was an American screen and stage actor whose performances in 1940s film noir classics such as The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, and The Big Sleep earned him status as a cultural icon.[4][5][6] Bogart began acting in 1921 after a hitch in the U.S. Navy in World War I and little success in various jobs in finance and the production side of the theater. Gradually he became a regular in Broadway shows in the 1920s and 1930s.[7] When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest
The Petrified Forest
(1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938). Bogart's breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941 with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon
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Musical Theater
Musical theatre
Musical theatre
is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. Although musical theatre overlaps with other theatrical forms like opera and dance, it may be distinguished by the equal importance given to the music as compared with the dialogue, movement and other elements. Since the early 20th century, musical theatre stage works have generally been called, simply, musicals. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America
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Radio Programming
Radio
Radio
programming is the broadcast programming of a radio format or content that is organized for commercial broadcasting and public broadcasting radio stations. The original inventors of radio, from Guglielmo Marconi's time on, expected it to be used for one-on-one wireless communication tasks where telephones and telegraphs could not be used because of the problems involved in stringing copper wires from one point to another, such as in ship-to-shore communications. Those inventors had no expectations whatever that radio would become a major mass media entertainment and information medium earning many millions of dollars in revenues annually through radio advertising commercials or sponsorship. These latter uses were brought about after 1920 by business entrepreneurs such as David Sarnoff, who created the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and William S. Paley, who built Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS)
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Duffy's Tavern
A tavern is a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and be served food, and in most cases, where travelers receive lodging. An inn is a tavern which has a license to put up guests as lodgers. The word derives from the Latin taberna whose original meaning was a shed, workshop, stall, or pub. Over time, the words "tavern" and "inn" became interchangeable and synonymous
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NBC Blue
The Blue Network
Blue Network
(previously the NBC
NBC
Blue Network) was the on-air name of the now defunct American radio network, which ran from 1927 to 1945
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Summer Stock
Summer Stock
Summer Stock
(UK title: If You Feel Like Singing) is a 1950 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
musical film in Technicolor. The film was directed by Charles Walters, stars Judy Garland
Judy Garland
and Gene Kelly, and features Eddie Bracken, Gloria DeHaven, Marjorie Main, and Phil Silvers. Nicholas Castle Sr was the choreographer. Judy Garland
Judy Garland
struggled with many personal problems during filming and Summer Stock
Summer Stock
proved to be her final film for MGM as well as her last onscreen pairing with Gene Kelly
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Harry Ackerman
Harry Stephen Ackerman (November 17, 1912 - February 3, 1991) was an American TV producer. He was known for many shows that went on to achieve iconic status, such as Bewitched, The Flying Nun, and Gidget. He was known as the "dean of television comedy," although he also was instrumental in developing many dramatic classics, such as The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, The Day Lincoln Was Shot, and The 20th Century.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Honors 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Harry Ackerman was born in Albany, New York
Albany, New York
and attended Dartmouth College as a theater arts major.[2] [1] Career[edit] Ackerman began his career as a writer, but soon became a radio performer, appearing as the comic poet Wilbur W
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Gerald Nachman (journalist)
Gerald Weil Nachman (born January 13, 1938) is a San Francisco journalist and author.[1]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Books 5 Musical Comedy Revues 6 References 7 External linksEducation[edit]Merritt College, A.A., 1958. Journalism, San Jose State University, B.A., 1960.[2]Career[edit]1963 TV writer for the San Jose Mercury News.[3] 1963-1966 feature writer for the New York Post 1966-1971 theater and film writer for the Oakland Tribune 1972–1979 columnist, syndicated by the New York Daily News[4][5] 1979-1993 entertainment and theater writer for the San Francisco Chronicle.[6] ?-present panelist, Minds Over Matter, KALW[7][8]Awards[edit]ASCAP Deems Taylor Award, for columns on Broadway lyricists New York Newspaper Guild Page One Award, for humor writingBooks[edit]Playing House. Doubleday. 1978. ISBN 978-0385123419.  Out on a whim: Some very close brushes with life. Doubleday. 1983. ISBN 978-0385123402.  The Fragile Bachelor
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Hollywood, Los Angeles, California
Hollywood
Hollywood
(/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. This densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S
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Academy Award
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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