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Ship Burial
A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself. If the ship is very small, it is called a boat grave. This style of burial was used among the Germanic peoples, particularly by Viking Age
Viking Age
Norsemen
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Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
(Russian: Вели́кий Но́вгород, IPA: [vʲɪˈlʲikʲɪj ˈnovɡərət]), also known as Novgorod the Great, or Novgorod Veliky, or just Novgorod, is one of the most important historic cities in Russia,[15] which serves as the administrative center of Novgorod Oblast. It is situated on the M10 federal highway connecting Moscow
Moscow
and St. Petersburg. The city lies along the Volkhov River
Volkhov River
just downstream from its outflow from Lake Ilmen. UNESCO
UNESCO
recognized Novgorod as a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1992
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Cairn
A cairn is a human-made pile (or stack) of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn [ˈkʰaːrˠn̪ˠ] (plural càirn [ˈkʰaːrˠɲ]).[1] Cairns
Cairns
have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from prehistoric times to the present.A cairn to mark a mountain summit in Graubünden, SwitzerlandIn modern times, cairns are often erected as landmarks, a use they have had since ancient times. However, since prehistory, they have also been built and used as burial monuments; for defense and hunting; for ceremonial purposes, sometimes relating to astronomy; to locate buried items, such as caches of food or objects; and to mark trails, among other purposes. Cairns
Cairns
are used as trail markers in many parts of the world, in uplands, on moorland, on mountaintops, near waterways and on sea cliffs, as well as in barren deserts and tundra
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Ohthere
Ohthere
Ohthere
(also Ohtere), Old Norse
Old Norse
Óttarr vendilkráka (Vendelcrow; in Modern Swedish Ottar Vendelkråka) is a semi-legendary king of Sweden of the house of Scylfings, who would have lived during the 6th century (fl. c. 515 – c. 530[1]). His name can be reconstructed as Proto-Norse
Proto-Norse
*Ōhta-harjaz or *Ōhtu-harjaz. The harjaz element is common in Germanic names and has a meaning of "warrior, army" (whence English harry); by contrast, the oht element is less frequent, and has been tentatively interpreted as "fearsome, feared".[2] A prince of the Swedes, Ohthere
Ohthere
and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats
Geats
after King Hrethel had died
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Uppland
Uppland
Uppland
(Swedish pronunciation: [ˈɵpːland] ( listen)) is a historical province or landskap on the eastern coast of Sweden, just north of Stockholm, the capital. It borders Södermanland, Västmanland
Västmanland
and Gästrikland. It is also bounded by lake Mälaren
Mälaren
and the Baltic sea. On the small uninhabited island of Märket
Märket
in the Baltic, Uppland
Uppland
has an extremely short and strangely shaped land border with Åland, an autonomous province of Finland. The name literally means up land, a name which is commonly encountered in especially older English literature. Its Latinised form, which is occasionally used, is Uplandia
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Anundshög
Anundshög (also Anundshögen and Anunds hög) is a tumulus near Västerås in Västmanland,[1] the largest in Sweden. It has a diameter of 60 metres (200 ft) and is about 9 metres (30 ft) high.[1] Assessments of the era of the mound vary between the Bronze Age and the late Iron Age.[2] A fireplace under it has been dated by radiocarbon dating to sometime between AD 210 and 540. Some historians have associated the mound with the legendary King Anund, while others regard this as speculative. It is purported also that the name is taken from the large runestone at the site, (Vs 13) the central stone in a row of 15 alongside the mound, re-erected in the 1960s and apparently marking out the route of the Eriksgata. The inscription on the runestone reads:+ fulkuiþr + raisti + stainn + þasi + ala + at + sun + + sin + hiþin + bruþur + anutaR + uraiþr hik + runaR"Folkvid raised all of these stones after his son Heden, Anund's brother
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Västerås
Västerås
Västerås
[vɛstɛrˈoːs] is a city in central Sweden, located on the shore of Lake Mälaren
Mälaren
in the province Västmanland, some 100 kilometres (62 miles) west of Stockholm. The city had a population of 119,372 inhabitants in 2016,[3] out of the municipal total of 150,000 (2017).[4] Västerås
Västerås
is the seat of Västerås
Västerås
Municipality, the capital of Västmanland
Västmanland
County and an episcopal see.Contents1 History 2 Today 3 Climate 4 Demographics 5 Economy5.1 Industry 5.2 Retailing and trade6 Sports 7 Notable natives 8 Travel 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Västerås
Västerås
circa 1700, in Suecia antiqua et hodierna.Gustav I of Sweden
Sweden
in Västerås, 1527
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Västmanland
Västmanland ( Listen (help·info)) is a historical Swedish province, or landskap, in middle Sweden. It borders Södermanland, Närke, Värmland, Dalarna and Uppland. The name comes from "West men", referring to the people west of Uppland, the core province of early Sweden.Contents1 Administration 2 Heraldry 3 Geography 4 History4.1 Dukes of Västmanland5 Culture 6 Notable residents 7 Sports 8 Subdivisions 9 References 10 External linksAdministration[edit] The traditional provinces of Sweden serve no administrative or political purposes (except sometimes as sport districts), but are historical and cultural entities. In the case of Västmanland the corresponding administrative county, Västmanland County, constitutes the eastern part of the province. The western part is in Örebro County. Heraldry[edit] The coat of arms was granted in 1560. At the time it featured one fire mountain, to represent the mine of Sala Municipality
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Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of Sweden Konungariket Sverige[a]FlagGreater coat of armsMotto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a] "For Sweden
Sweden
– With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b] Thou ancient, thou freeRoyal anthem: Kungssången Song of the KingLocation of  Sweden  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and
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Öland
Öland
Öland
(Swedish pronunciation: [ˈøːland] ( listen), known in Latin
Latin
as Oelandia, and sometimes written Øland in other Scandinavian languages, and Oland internationally) is the second largest Swedish island and the smallest of the traditional provinces of Sweden. Öland
Öland
has an area of 1,342 square kilometres (518 square miles) and is located in the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
just off the coast of Småland
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Fyris
Fyrisån (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈfyːrɪsˌoːn], the Fyris river) is a river in the Swedish province of Uppland, which passes through the city of Uppsala
Uppsala
and ends in Lake Mälaren. In Old Norse, the river was called Fýri, and in later times it was known as the Full or the Sala river – Sala referred to the halls (Up-Salir) of the Swedish kings at Gamla Uppsala
Uppsala
– but its name was changed in the 17th century in memory of the Fyrisvellir, marshy plains which had long since been turned to agriculture, but were famous from Norse mythology
Norse mythology
and as the site of the Battle of Fýrisvellir in the late 10th century. Boats can sail up the river from Lake Mälaren
Mälaren
all the way to central Uppsala
Uppsala
where two weirs make further progress impossible
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Sanday, Orkney
Sanday is one of the inhabited islands of Orkney
Orkney
that lies off the north coast of mainland Scotland. With an area of 50.43 square kilometres (19.5 sq mi),[3] it is the third largest of the Orkney
Orkney
Islands.[8] The main centres of population are Lady Village and Kettletoft
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Orkney Islands
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
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East Anglia
East Anglia
East Anglia
is a geographical area in the East of England. The area included has varied[1] but the legally defined NUTS 2 statistical unit comprises the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, including the City of Peterborough
Peterborough
unitary authority.[2] The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom of the East Angles, a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany.Contents1 Area 2 History 3 Geography3.1 Climate4 Transport 5 Universities 6 Enterprise zones 7 Symbols and culture 8 Tourism 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksArea[edit] Definitions of what constitutes East Anglia
East Anglia
vary
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