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Shinano River Incident
The Shinano River
Shinano River
incident (信濃川朝鮮人虐殺事件, Shinanogawa Chōsenjin Gyakusatsu Jiken) was the massacre of up to 100 Korean labourers in July 1922[1][2] who were working for the Okura zaibatsu at the construction site of a power plant on the Shinano River.[citation needed]Contents1 Background 2 Massacre 3 Aftermath 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyBackground[edit] Shin'etsu Electric Power Inc., later absorbed into the Tokyo Electric Light Company and finally the Tokyo Electric Power Company, started building hydroelectric plants in July 1922 including Nakatsu Power Plant #1 on the Nakatsu River which is a tributary of the Shinano River
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Okura Kihachiro
Incorporates translations from the corresponding Japanese article Baron Ōkura Kihachirō (大倉 喜八郎, October 23, 1837 – April 5, 1928) was an entrepreneur who built up the Ōkura-gumi and founded the giant Ōkura zaibatsu (literally financial cliques) and the Ōkura Shōgyō Gakkō which later became Tokyo Keizai University
Tokyo Keizai University
in 1949.Contents1 Biography 2 Honors2.1 Japanese 2.2 Others3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] In contrast to most of the zaibatsu, the Ōkura zaibatsu was founded by someone from the peasant class
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Ketto Dam
Ketto Dam (Japanese: 穴藤ダム) is a dam in Tsunan, Niigata Prefecture, Japan, near the village of Ketto. It was completed in 1972.[1] References[edit]^ http://damnet.or.jp/cgi-bin/binranA/enAll.cgi?db4=0760v t eDams in Niigata PrefectureAburumagawa Dam Agekawa Dam Asagawara Dam Futai Dam Iwafune Dam Kajigawa Dam Kakizakigawa Dam Kanose Dam Kasabori Dam Ketto Dam Kassa Dam Kassagawa Dam Konoyama Dam Kuromata Dam Kuromatagawa Dam Miomote Dam Miyanaka Dam Oishi Dam Okumiomote Dam Okutadami Dam Otani Dam Sagurigawa Dam Saruta Dam Sasagamine Dam Shozenji Dam Tainai Dam Tainaigawa Dam Takanosu Dam Toyomi Dam Uchinokura Dam Yamamoto DamCoordinates: 36°56′40″N 138°39′36″E / 36.94444°N 138.66000°E / 36.94444; 138.66000This article about a dam or floodgate in Japan is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis Niigata Prefecture location article is a stub
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Manabu Miyazaki
Manabu Miyazaki (宮崎 学, Miyazaki Manabu, born October 25, 1945) is a Japanese writer, social critic and public figure. He is the author of several best-selling books in Japan. His autobiography Toppamono sold 600,000 copies and has since been translated into English. In 1985, Miyazaki was named by the Tokyo police as the prime suspect in the Glico Morinaga case, a 17-month saga of kidnapping and corporate extortion. He was later cleared.[1]Contents1 Translated work 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTranslated work[edit]Manabu Miyazaki; Toppamono: Outlaw. Radical. Suspect. My Life in Japan's Underworld (2005, Kotan Publishing, ISBN 0-9701716-2-5)See also[edit]Shinichiro KurimotoReferences[edit]^ Sayaka Yakushiji (22 October 2005). "Weekend Beat: `Thoroughbred yakuza' survives suspicion, shootout". Asahi Shimbun. Archived from the original on December 20, 2005
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Fumiko Kaneko
Fumiko Kaneko (金子 文子, Kaneko Fumiko, January 25, 1903 – July 23, 1926[1]) or rarely Pak Fumiko, was a Japanese anarchist and nihilist. She was convicted of plotting to assassinate members of the Japanese Imperial family.Contents1 Early life 2 Life in Korea 3 Return to Japan 4 Experiences in Tokyo 5 Fumiko Kaneko and Pak Yol 6 Ideological views 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 Notes9.1 References10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Fumiko Kaneko was born in the Kotobuki district of Yokohama during the Meiji period in Japan. Her parents were Fumikazu Saeki, a man from a samurai family, and Kikuno Kaneko, the daughter of a peasant, and because they were not officially married, Fumiko could not be registered as a Saeki. She remained unregistered until she was 8 years old, at which point she was registered as her mother’s sister, a fairly common practice for children born out of wedlock
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Park Yeol
Pak Yol
Pak Yol
(February 3, 1902 – January 17, 1974, born Pak Jun-sik) or Bak Yeol, was a Korean anarchist and independence activist who was convicted of high treason in Japan for conspiring to attack the Imperial House of Japan.Contents1 Biography 2 In popular culture 3 See also 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit]Pak was born in Mungyeong, North Gyeongsang, Korea. He attended highschool in Seoul
Seoul
but was forced to leave in 1919 due to his suspected participation in the March First Movement. After moving to Tokyo
Tokyo
to continue his education he met other student activists, and formed his own anarchist group Futeisha (不逞社, "The Outlaws"). Its name satirized the way Koreans were referred to by the authorities as troublemakers
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Yomiuri Shimbun
The Yomiuri Shimbun
Yomiuri Shimbun
(読売新聞, Yomiuri Shinbun) is a Japanese newspaper published in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, and other major Japanese cities.[3] It is part of the Yomiuri Group, Japan's largest media conglomerate.[4] It is one of the five national newspapers in Japan; the other four are the Asahi Shimbun, the Mainichi Shimbun, Nihon Keizai Shimbun, and the Sankei Shimbun. The headquarters is in Otemachi, Chiyoda, Tokyo.[5] Founded in 1874,[6] the Yomiuri Shimbun
Yomiuri Shimbun
is credited with having the largest newspaper circulation in the world,[7][8] having a combined morning and evening circulation of 14,323,781 through January 2002
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Zaibatsu
Zaibatsu
Zaibatsu
(豪商, "financial clique") is a Japanese term referring to industrial and financial business conglomerates in the Empire of Japan, whose influence and size allowed control over significant parts of the Japanese economy
Japanese economy
from the Meiji period
Meiji period
until the end of World War II.Contents1 Terminology 2 Significance 3 History and development3.1 Big Four 3.2 New zaibatsu 3.3 Postwar dissolution 3.4 Modern-day influence4 List of zaibatsu 5 Popular culture 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksTerminology[edit] The term "zaibatsu" was coined in 19th century Japan
Japan
from the Sino-Japanese roots zai 財 ("wealth", from Middle Chinese
Middle Chinese
dzoi) and batsu 閥 ("clique", "group", from Middle Chinese
Middle Chinese
bjot)
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Niigata Prefecture
Niigata Prefecture
Niigata Prefecture
(新潟県, Niigata-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Honshu
Honshu
on the coast of the Sea of Japan.[1] The capital is the
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Cement
A cement is a binder, a substance used for construction that sets, hardens and adheres to other materials, binding them together. Cement is seldom used on its own, but rather to bind sand and gravel (aggregate) together. Cement
Cement
is used with fine aggregate to produce mortar for masonry, or with sand and gravel aggregates to produce concrete. Cements used in construction are usually inorganic, often lime or calcium silicate based, and can be characterized as being either hydraulic or non-hydraulic, depending upon the ability of the cement to set in the presence of water (see hydraulic and non-hydraulic lime plaster). Non-hydraulic cement will not set in wet conditions or under water; rather, it sets as it dries and reacts with carbon dioxide in the air. It is resistant to attack by chemicals after setting. Hydraulic cements (e.g., Portland cement) set and become adhesive due to a chemical reaction between the dry ingredients and water
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Dormitory
In United States usage, the word dormitory means a building primarily providing sleeping and residential quarters for large numbers of people, often boarding school, college or university students. In the US it is common for residents (typically two) to share a bedroom
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Korean People
 South Korea      50,423,955 (2014 estimate)[2]  North Korea      25,300,000 (2014 estimate)[3] Diaspora as of 2015[update] c
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Tokyo Electric Power Company
Tokyo
Tokyo
Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc. (東京電力ホールディングス株式会社, Tōkyō Denryoku Hôrudingusu Kabushiki-gaisha, TYO: 9501), also known as Toden (東電, Tōden) or TEPCO, is a Japanese electric utility holding company servicing Japan's Kantō region, Yamanashi Prefecture, and the eastern portion of Shizuoka Prefecture. This area includes Tokyo. Its headquarters are located in Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda, Tokyo, and international branch offices exist in Washington, D.C., and London. It is a founding member of strategic consortiums related to energy innovation and research; such as JINED,[2] INCJ[3] and MAI.[4] In 2007, TEPCO was forced to shut the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant after the Niigata-Chuetsu-Oki earthquake
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Zainichi Koreans
Koreans in Japan (在日韓国人・在日本朝鮮人・朝鮮人, Zainichi-Kankoku-Jin or Zainihonchosenjin or Chōsen-jin) comprise ethnic Koreans who have permanent residency status in Japan, or who have become Japanese citizens, and whose immigration to Japan originated before 1945, or who are descendents of those immigrants. They are a distinct group from South Korean nationals who have emigrated to Japan after the end of World War II and the division of Korea. They currently constitute the second largest ethnic minority group in Japan after Chinese immigrants.[2] The majority of Koreans in Japan are Zainichi Koreans (在日韓国人, Zainichi Kankokujin), often known simply as Zainichi (在日, "Japan resident"), who are the permanent ethnic Korean residents of Japan
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