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Shi Yongxin
Shi Yongxin (Chinese: 释永信; pinyin: Shì Yǒngxìn) is the current abbot of the Shaolin Temple. He is the thirteenth successor after Shi Xingzheng. He is the Chairman of the Henan Province Buddhists Association, a representative of the Ninth National People's Congress and also one of the first Chinese monks ever to get an MBA degree.Contents1 Biography 2 Criticism2.1 Prostitution Rumor3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Shi Yongxin was born as Liu Yingcheng (刘应成) in Anhui
Anhui
Province's Yingshang County. Shi Yongxin is his Buddhist name. At the request of his parents, he entered monastic life at the age of 16 at Shaolin Monastery, and received full precepts in 1984
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Zen
Zen
Zen
in JapanDōgen Hakuin EkakuSeon in KoreaTaego Bou Jinul Daewon Seongcheol Zen
Zen
in the USAD. T
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Iconography Of Gautama Buddha In Laos And Thailand
The Iconography
Iconography
of Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
in Laos
Laos
and Thailand
Thailand
is referred to as pang phraputtarup th:ปางพระพุทธรูป, and a given pose as pang Thai: ปาง episode. These recall specific episodes during his travels and teachings that are familiar to the Buddhists according to an iconography with specific rules; certain ones of these are considered particularly auspicious for those born on particular days of the week.[1] The Buddha is always represented with certain physical attributes, and in specified dress and specified poses. Each pose, and particularly the position and gestures of the Buddha's hands, has a defined meaning which is familiar to Buddhists
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Four Noble Truths
The Four Noble Truths
Four Noble Truths
refer to and express the basic orientation of Buddhism[1] in a short expression:[2][note 1] we crave and cling to impermanent states and things,[3] which are dukkha,[4] "incapable of satisfying"[web 1] and painful.[web 1][3][5][6][7][web 2] This craving keeps us caught in samsara,[note 2] the endless cycle of repeated rebirth and dying again, and the dukkha that comes with it.[note 3] There is, however, a way to end this cycle,[8][note 4] namely by attaining nirvana, cessation of craving, whereafter rebirth and associated dukkha will no longer aris
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Noble Eightfold Path
The Noble Eightfold Path
Noble Eightfold Path
(Pali: ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo, Sanskrit: āryāṣṭāṅgamārga)[1] is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth.[2][3] The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right samadhi ('meditative absorption or union').[4] In early Buddhism, these practices started with insight (right view), culminating in dhyana or samadhi as the core soteriological practice.[5] In lat
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Nirvana
Nirvāṇa (/nɪərˈvɑːnə/ neer-VAH-nə, /-ˈvænə/ -VAN-ə, /nər-/ nər-;[1] Sanskrit: निर्वाण nirvāṇa [nirʋaːɳə]; Pali: निब्बान nibbāna; Prakrit: णिव्वाण ṇivvāṇa) literally means "blown out", as in an oil lamp.[2] The term "nirvana" is most commonly associated with Buddhism, and represents its ultimate state of soteriological release and liberation from rebirths in saṃsāra.[3][web 1][4] In Indian religions, nirvana is synonymous with moksha and mukti.[note 1] All Indian religions
Indian religions
assert it to be a state of perfect
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Middle Way
The Middle Way
Middle Way
or Middle Path (Pali: Majjhimāpaṭipadā; Sanskrit: Madhyamāpratipad[1][a]; Tibetan: དབུ་མའི་ལམ།, THL: Umélam; Chinese: 中道; Vietnamese: Trung đạo; Thai: มัชฌิมาปฏิปทา) is the term that Gautama Buddha used to describe the character of the Noble Eightfold Path
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Tathāgata
ᠲᠡᠭᠦᠨᠴᠢᠯᠡᠨ ᠢᠷᠡᠭᠰᠡᠨ Түүнчлэн ирсэнTibetan དེ་བཞིན་གཤེགས་པ་Thai ตถาคตVietnamese Như LaiGlossary of BuddhismTathagata, Lord Buddha amidst clouds and hills in Sikkim, India, 2016 Tathāgata
Tathāgata
(Sanskrit: [t̪əˈt̪ʰɑːɡət̪ə]) is a Pali
Pali
and Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word; Gotama Buddha uses it when referring to himself in the Pāli Canon. The term is often thought to mean either "one who has thus gone" (tathā-gata) or "one who has thus come" (tathā-āgata). This is interpreted as signifying that the Tathāgata
Tathāgata
is beyond all coming and going – beyond all transitory phenomena
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Buddha's Birthday
varies by region:April 8 or May 8 (Japan) Second Sunday in May (Taiwan) 8th day of 4th lunar month (mainland East Asia) first full moon of Vaisakha
Vaisakha
( South Asia
South Asia
and
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Four Sights
The four sights are four things described in the legendary account of Gautama Buddha's life which led to his realization of the impermanence and ultimate dissatisfaction of conditioned existence. According to this legend, before these encounters Siddhārtha Gautama had been confined to his palace by his father, who feared that he would become an ascetic if he came into contact with sufferings of life according to a prediction. However, on his first venture out of the palace deeply and made him realize the sufferings of all beings, and compelled him to begin his spiritual journey as a wandering ascetic, which eventually led to his enlightenment
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Physical Characteristics Of The Buddha
There are no extant representations of the Buddha
Buddha
represented in artistic form until roughly the 2nd century CE, partly due to the prominence of aniconism in the earliest extant period of Buddhist devotional statuary and bas reliefs.[1] A number of early discourses describe the appearance of the Buddha, and are believed to have served as a model for early depictions.[2] In particular, the "32 signs of a Great Man" are described throughout the
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Buddha Footprint
The footprint of the Buddha is an imprint of Gautama Buddha's one or both feet. There are two forms: natural, as found in stone or rock, and those made artificially.[1] Many of the "natural" ones are acknowledged not to be actual footprints of the Buddha, but replicas or representations of them, which can be considered cetiya (Buddhist relics) and also an early aniconic and symbolic representation of the Buddha.[2]Contents1 Symbolism 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksSymbolism[edit] The footprints of Buddha are along the path from aniconic to iconic which starts at symbols like the wheel and moves to statues of Buddha. These footprints are meant to remind that Buddha was present on earth and left a spiritual ‘path’ to be followed. They are special as they are the only monuments which give Buddha a physical presence on earth as they are actual depression in the earth
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Relics Associated With Buddha
According to Mahaparinibbana Sutta, after his death, the Gautama Buddha
Buddha
was cremated and the ashes divided among his followers.Contents1 Division of the relics 2 Spread of the relics by Ashoka 3 Relics in Afghanistan 4 Relics in America 5 Relics in Bangladesh 6 Relics in Bhutan 7 Relics in Cambodia 8 Relics in China 9 Relics in India 10 Relics in Indonesia 11 Relics in Japan 12 Relics in Korea 13 Relics in Laos 14 Relics in Malaysia 15 Relics in Mongolia 16 Relics in Myanmar 17 Relics in Nepal 18 Relics in Pakistan 19 Relics in Persia 20
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Depictions Of Gautama Buddha In Film
The life of Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, has been the subject of several films.Contents1 History 2 List of films on the life of Buddha 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first known film about the life of Buddha was Buddhadev (English title: Lord Buddha) which was produced by the well-known Indian filmmaker Dadasaheb Phalke
Dadasaheb Phalke
(1870–1944) in 1923. Two years later, another important Buddha film was released, The Light of Asia (Hindi title: Prem Sanyas). This movie was made by the German filmmaker Franz Osten (1875–1956). Himansu Rai
Himansu Rai
(1892–1940) played the Buddha. Its title suggests that the script was based on the book The Light of Asia composed by the British poet Sir Edwin Arnold, which was issued by the Theosophical Society
Theosophical Society
in 1891. In fact, its contents deviate deliberately from Arnold's book
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Miracles Of Gautama Buddha
According to Buddhist texts, Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
possessed several superhuman powers and abilities; however, due to an understanding of the workings of the skeptical mind and how the display of miracles can be abused by unscrupulous people, he reportedly responded to a request for miracles by saying, "...I dislike, reject and despise them,"[1] and refused to comply.Contents1 Miraculous birth 2 Other miracles 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksMiraculous birth[edit] Main article: Miraculous birthsThe infant Buddha taking the Seven Steps
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