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Shenzhen Metro
3.9 million (2016) 5.39 million (2017 Peak)[2]Annual ridership 1.297 billion (2016)[3]Website SZMC ( Shenzhen
Shenzhen
Metro Group) MTR Corporation
MTR Corporation
(Shenzhen) (Chinese only)OperationBegan operation 28 December 2004O
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Cantonese
Cantonese, or Standard Cantonese, is a variety of the Chinese language spoken within Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(historically known as Canton) and its vicinity in southeastern China. It is the traditional prestige variety of Yue, one of the major subdivisions of Chinese. In mainland China, it is the lingua franca of the province of Guangdong, being the majority language of the Pearl River Delta, and neighbouring areas such as Guangxi. It is the dominant and official language of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
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Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese, also known as Modern Standard Mandarin, Standard Mandarin, or simply Mandarin, is a standard variety of Chinese that is the sole official language of both China
China
and Taiwan
Taiwan
(de facto), and also one of the four official languages of Singapore. Its pronunciation is based on the Beijing
Beijing
dialect, its vocabulary on the Mandarin dialects, and its grammar is based on written vernacular Chinese. Like other varieties of Chinese, Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
is a tonal language with topic-prominent organization and subject–verb–object word order. It has more initial consonants but fewer vowels, final consonants and tones than southern varieties
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East Rail Line
East
East
is one of the four cardinal directions or points of the compass. It is the opposite direction from west.Contents1 Etymology 2 Navigation 3 Cultural 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word east comes from Middle English
Middle English
est, from Old English
Old English
ēast, which itself comes from the Proto-Germanic *aus-to- or *austra- "east, toward the sunrise", from Proto-Indo-European *aus- "to shine," or "dawn".[1] This is similar to Old High German
Old High German
*ōstar "to the east", Latin
Latin
aurora "dawn", and Greek ēōs ἠώς.[2] Ēostre, a Germanic goddess of dawn, might have been a personification of both dawn and the cardinal points. Navigation[edit] By convention, the right hand side of a map is east. This convention has developed from the use of a compass, which places north at the top
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Shenzhen Special Economic Zone
Shenzhen
Shenzhen
Special
Special
Economic
Economic
Zone (Chinese: 深圳经济特区), established in May 1980, is the first special economic zone in the People's Republic of China. Seven other special economic zones were subsequently established. Until 2010, Shenzhen
Shenzhen
Special
Special
Economic
Economic
Zone comprised four of the twenty districts of Shenzhen
Shenzhen
City in Guangdong
Guangdong
Province, namely Luohu, Futian, Nanshan, and Yantian, with a total area of 493 km²
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Mainland China
Mainland China, also known as the Chinese mainland, is the geopolitical as well as geographical area under the direct jurisdiction of the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC). It includes Hainan
Hainan
island and strictly speaking, politically, does not include the special administrative regions of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau, even though both are partially on the geographic mainland (continental landmass). The term "mainland China" was coined[citation needed] by the Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT Party) after receiving control of Taiwan
Taiwan
from Japan after World War II. By 1949, the KMT-led Republic of China
China
(ROC) government was defeated in the Chinese Civil War
Chinese Civil War
and fled to the island of Taiwan
Taiwan
where the KMT pledged to "retake the Mainland"
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Yale Romanization Of Cantonese
The Yale romanization of Cantonese
Cantonese
was developed by Gerard P. Kok for his and Parker Po-fei Huang's textbook Speak Cantonese
Cantonese
initially circulated in looseleaf form in 1952[1] but later published in 1958.[2] Unlike the Yale romanization of Mandarin, it is still widely used in books and dictionaries, especially for foreign learners of Cantonese. It shares some similarities with Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
in that unvoiced, unaspirated consonants are represented by letters traditionally used in English and most other European languages to represent voiced sounds. For example, [p] is represented as b in Yale, whereas its aspirated counterpart, [pʰ] is represented as p
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Tianjin Metro
5 operational 1 under construction 9 plannedNumber of stations 113Daily ridership 701,000 (2015 Avg.) 1,080,700 (2014 peak)Annual ridership 41.8 million (2010)(BMT excluded)[1]Website http://www.tjdt.cn http://www.ctbmt.cn/OperationBegan operation 28 December 1984 (old system) 12 June 2006 (new system)Operator(s) Tianjin Metro General Corp. Tianjin Binhai Mass Transit Development Co., Ltd.TechnicalSystem length 162.859 km (101 mi)Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) standard gaugeTianjin MetroSimplified Chinese 天津地铁Traditional Chinese 天津地鐵TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Tiānjīn dìtiěMetro sign at Yingkoudao stationEntrance to Xinanjiao stationThe Tianjin Metro is the rapid transit system in the city of Tianjin, which was the second city in China to operate a subway system
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Wuhan Metro
The Wuhan Metro is a metro system serving the city of Wuhan, Hubei, China, operated by the Wuhan Metro Co., Ltd. The system began operation on July 28, 2004 with the completion of a ten-station long elevated line between Huangpu Road and Zongguan,[3] making Wuhan the fifth city in mainland China to have a metro system after Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, and Guangzhou.[4] Line 1 is the first metro line in China to have been wrongly referred to as a light rail (轻轨, qing gui) system in Chinese terminology.[5] As of December 2017[update], there are seven lines in operation, totaling 166 stations and 237 kilometres (147 mi) of system length.[6] The daily ridership of Wuhan Metro ranges from 2,200,000 to 2,800,000.[7][8] Wuhan Metro is pursuing ambitious expansion projects to connect Wuhan's three boroughs, divided by the Yangtze River and Han River, to accommodate increasing inter-borough traffic and provide commuter services to suburban satellite cities
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