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Shennong Ben Cao Jing
Shennong
Shennong
Bencaojing (also The Classic of Herbal Medicine and Shen-nung Pen-tsao Ching; simplified Chinese: 神农本草经; traditional Chinese: 神農本草經; pinyin: Shénnóng Běncǎo Jīng; Wade–Giles: Shen2-nung2 Pen3-ts'ao3 Ching1) is a Chinese book on agriculture and medicinal plants. Its origin has been attributed to the mythical Chinese sovereign Shennong, who was said to have lived around 2800 BC
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Cannabis
Cannabis
Cannabis
(/ˈkænəbɪs/) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Cannabaceae. The number of species within the genus is disputed. Three species may be recognized: Cannabis
Cannabis
sativa, Cannabis
Cannabis
indica, and Cannabis
Cannabis
ruderalis; C. ruderalis may be included within C. sativa; or all three may be treated as subspecies of a single species, C. sativa.[2][3][4][1] The genus is indigenous to central Asia and the Indian subcontinent.[5] Cannabis
Cannabis
has long been used for hemp fibre, for hemp oils, for medicinal purposes, and as a recreational drug. Industrial hemp products are made from cannabis plants selected to produce an abundance of fiber
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Ge Hong
Ge Hong (葛洪; b. 283 [1][2] - d. 343 [1] or 363 [2]) was an Eastern Jin Dynasty scholar, and the author of Essays on Chinese Characters. References[edit]^ a b Wells, Matthew (18 July 2013). "Self as Historical Artifact: Ge Hong and Early Chinese Autobiographical Writing". Early Medieval China. 2003 (1): 71–103. doi:10.1179/152991003788138465.  ^ a b Liu, Peng (12 October 2016). ""Conceal my Body so that I can Protect the State": The Making of the Mysterious Woman in Daoism and Water Margin". Ming Studies. 2016 (74): 48–71. doi:10.1080/0147037X.2016.1228876. Further reading[edit]Campany, Robert Ford. To Live As Long As Heaven and Earth: Ge Hong’s Traditions of Divine Transcendents. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002Davis, Tenney and Ch’en Kuo-fu. "The Inner Chapters of Pao-p’u-tzu." Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 74 (1941): 297-325. [chaps. 8 and 11]] Fang Xuanling, et. al
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List Of Chinese Physicians
Contents1 B 2 C 3 G 4 H 5 J 6 L 7 M 8 N 9 S 10 W 11 ZB[edit] Bian Que
Bian Que
(扁鹊)(ca. 500 B.C.). - TCM physicianC[edit]Buwei Yang Chao(1889–1981) Dr. Margaret Chan
Margaret Chan
(陳馮富珍) - Current Director-General of the WHO (4 January 2007 - 30 June 2012) Chen Cheng - 陈承G[edit] Gao Yaojie
Gao Yaojie
(高耀洁医生) Ge HongH[edit] Hua Tuo
Hua Tuo
(华佗)(ca. 110 - 207). - TCM physician Dr
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Peach
The peach ( Prunus
Prunus
persica) is a deciduous tree native to the region of Northwest China
Northwest China
between the Tarim Basin
Tarim Basin
and the north slopes of the Kunlun Mountains, where it was first domesticated and cultivated.[3] It bears an edible juicy fruit called a peach or a nectarine. The specific epithet persica refers to its widespread cultivation in Persia
Persia
(modern-day Iran), whence it was transplanted to Europe. It belongs to the genus Prunus
Prunus
which includes the cherry, apricot, almond and plum, in the rose family. The peach is classified with the almond in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated seed shell. Peach
Peach
and nectarines are the same species, even though they are regarded commercially as different fruits
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Cucumber
Cucumber
Cucumber
( Cucumis
Cucumis
sativus) is a widely cultivated plant in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae. It is a creeping vine that bears cucumiform fruits that are used as vegetables. There are three main varieties of cucumber: slicing, pickling, and seedless. Within these varieties, several cultivars have been created. In North America, the term "wild cucumber" refers to plants in the genera Echinocystis
Echinocystis
and Marah, but these are not closely related. The cucumber is originally from South Asia, but now grows on most continents
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Peonies
and for lower taxa see textThe range of Paeonia.The peony or paeony[2][3] is a flowering plant in the genus Paeonia, the only genus in the family Paeoniaceae. They are native to Asia, Europe
Europe
and Western North America. Scientists differ on the number of species that can be distinguished ranging from 25 to 40,[4][5] although the current consensus is 33 known species.[6] The relationships between the species need to be further clarified.[7] Most are herbaceous perennial plants 0.25–1 metre (0.82–3.28 ft) tall, but some are woody shrubs 0.25–3.5 metres (0.82–11.48 ft) tall
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Ginger
Ginger
Ginger
( Zingiber
Zingiber
officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine.[2] It is a herbaceous perennial which grows annual pseudostems (false stems made of the rolled bases of leaves) about a meter tall bearing narrow leaf blades. The inflorescences bear pale yellow with purple flowers and arise directly from the rhizome on separate shoots.[3] Ginger
Ginger
is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal
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Glycyrrhiza Uralensis
Glycyrrhiza
Glycyrrhiza
uralensis, also known as Chinese liquorice,[2] is a flowering plant native to Asia. It is used as a sweetener and in traditional Chinese medicine.[3]Contents1 Medicinal uses1.1 Side effects2 See also 3 References 4 External linksMedicinal uses[edit]This section needs more medical references for verification or relies too heavily on primary sources. Please review the contents of the section and add the appropriate references if you can. Unsourced or poorly sourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) Liquorice
Liquorice
root, or 'radix glycyrrhizae', is one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, where it has the name gancao (kan-tsao; Chinese: 甘草, pinyin: gāncǎo).[3] It is usually collected in spring and autumn, when it is removed from the rootlet and dried in the sun
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Medicine In China
In China, most hospitals are run by the government. Physicians were previously quasi-government employees and with little freedom in the choice of the hospital to work with. In addition, decades of planned economic policy discouraged physicians from opening their own clinics, and the practice of medicine was generally non-private. While there are private clinics in China, many of the owners of those clinics do not have a western medical education. Most of these private practitioners practice traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)
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Eucommia Ulmoides
Eucommia
Eucommia
ulmoides is a species of small tree native to China. It belongs to the monotypic family, Eucommiaceae. It is near threatened in the wild, but is widely cultivated in China
China
for its bark and is highly valued in herbology such as Traditional Chinese medicine.Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Distribution 4 Uses 5 Chemistry 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] Eucommia
Eucommia
ulmoides grows to about 15 m tall. The leaves are deciduous, arranged alternately, simple ovate with an acuminate tip, 8–16 cm long, and with a serrated margin. If a leaf is torn across, strands of latex exuded from the leaf veins solidify into rubber and hold the two parts of the leaf together. It flowers from March to May
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Three Sovereigns And Five Emperors
The Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors
Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors
were a group of mythological rulers or deities in ancient northern China
China
who in later history have been assigned dates in a period from circa 2852 BC to 2070 BC. Today they are considered culture heroes.[1] The dates of these mythological figures may be fictitious, but according to some accounts and reconstructions, they preceded the Xia Dynasty (which itself is prehistoric, without writing, and which is likewise also documented only in much later written sources).[2]Contents1 Description 2 Shi 3 Variations3.1 Family tree of ancient Five Emperors4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingDescription[edit] The Three Sovereigns, sometimes known as the Three August Ones, were said to be god-kings, demigods or god emperors[3] who used their abilities to improve the lives of their people and impart to them essential skills and knowledge
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