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Sharpe's Skirmish
"Sharpe's Skirmish" is a historical short story by Bernard Cornwell
Bernard Cornwell
in the Richard Sharpe series. "Sharpe's Skirmish" was first written in 1998. British bookseller W. H. Smith[1] devised the idea of giving away a Sharpe short story with every copy of Sharpe's Fortress, possibly why "Sharpe’s Skirmish" often refers to events that happened in the latter book.[citation needed] Only a few thousand copies were originally published, however an edition has been republished by the Sharpe Appreciation Society.Contents1 Plot 2 Characters in "Sharpe's Skirmish" 3 Allusions to actual history, geography and current science 4 Publication history 5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] This short story occurs after Sharpe's Sword and before Sharpe’s Enemy in the summer of 1812 and Sharpe must guard a Commissary Officer posted to an obscure Spanish fort where there are some captured French muskets
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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke Of Wellington
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852), was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister. His defeat of Napoleon
Napoleon
at the Battle of Waterloo
Battle of Waterloo
in 1815 puts him in the first rank of Britain's military heroes. Wellesley was born in Dublin, into the Protestant Ascendancy
Protestant Ascendancy
in Ireland. He was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army
British Army
in 1787, serving in Ireland
Ireland
as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland. He was also elected as a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons
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Heretic (novel)
Heretic is the third novel in The Grail Quest series by Bernard Cornwell. Set during the first stage of the Hundred Years War, the novel follows Thomas of Hookton's quest to find the Holy Grail, a relic which may grant decisive victory to the possessor.[1][2] Plot summary[edit] Heretic begins with a bloody battle outside Calais in 1347, a short time before the city fell to the English. The sympathetic Thomas of Hookton is bending every sinew at the service of his master, the Earl of Northampton; after risking his life time and again, Thomas finds himself commissioned to track down the most sacred relic in Christendom, the Holy Grail. He travels to Gascony, seat of power of his nemesis, Guy Vexille. With his cunning, Thomas is able to take control of a fictional fortress town and there meets Genevieve, a local woman about to be burned at the stake for witchcraft. Thomas saves her, however the action costs him dearly for he is later excommunicated
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Harper Collins
HarperCollins
HarperCollins
Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987 (whose own name was the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company), together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins
HarperCollins
is Brian Murray.[1] HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, and China
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Gawilghur
Gawilghur
Gawilghur
(also Gawilgarh
Gawilgarh
or Gawilgad) was a well-fortified mountain stronghold of the Maratha Empire
Maratha Empire
north of the Deccan Plateau, in the vicinity of Melghat Tiger Reserve, Amravati District,[1] Maharashtra. It was successfully assaulted by an Anglo-Indian force commanded by Arthur Wellesley on 15 December 1803 during the Second Anglo-Maratha War. The campaign to take Gawilghur
Gawilghur
forms the background of the novel Sharpe's Fortress
Sharpe's Fortress
by Bernard Cornwell, the third in a series of books covering the hero's time in the British army in India
India
during the Napoleonic era.Contents1 History 2 Major features 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The fort takes its name from the Gawli (cow herds) who inhabited the Berar (modern day Amravati) for centuries
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Peninsular War
French Empire Bonapartist Spain Confederation of the Rhine Napoleonic Italy Duchy of WarsawCommanders and leaders Arthur Wellesley William Beresford Rowland Hill John Moore † Francisco Castaños Juan Martín Díez José Palafox Gregorio de la Cuesta Miguel Álava Esquivel Joaquín Blake Bernardino Freire † Francisco da Silveira Napoleon
Napoleon
I Joseph I Joachim Murat Jean-Andoche Junot Jean de Dieu Soult André Masséna Michel Ney Louis Gabriel Suchet Jean Lannes Joseph Mortier Auguste de Marmont Jean-Baptiste Bessières Jean-Baptiste Jourd
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Excalibur
Excalibur, or Caliburn, is the legendary sword of King Arthur, sometimes also attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Britain. Sometimes Excalibur
Excalibur
and the Sword
Sword
in the Stone (the proof of Arthur's lineage) are said to be the same weapon, but in most versions they are considered separate. Excalibur was associated with the Arthurian legend
Arthurian legend
very early
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W. H. Smith
WHSmith
WHSmith
plc (also known as WHS or colloquially as Smith's, and formerly W. H. Smith & Son) is a British retailer, headquartered in Swindon, Wiltshire, which operates a chain of high street, railway station, airport, port, hospital and motorway service station shops selling books, stationery, magazines, newspapers and entertainment products. The company was formed by Henry Walton Smith and his wife Anna in 1792 as a news vendor in London. It remained under the ownership of the Smith family for many years, and saw large-scale expansion during the 1970s as the company began to diversify into other markets. Following a rejected private equity takeover in 2004, the company began to focus on its core retail business
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Paperback
A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.[1] Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks" and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format, and the largest C-format sizes.[2] Paperback
Paperback
editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks
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HarperCollins
HarperCollins
HarperCollins
Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987 (whose own name was the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company), together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins
HarperCollins
is Brian Murray.[1] HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, and China
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Historical Fiction
Historical fiction is a literary genre in which the plot takes place in a setting located in the past. Historical fiction can be an umbrella term; though commonly used as a synonym for describing the historical novel; the term can be applied to works in other narrative formats, such as those in the performing and visual arts like theatre, opera, cinema and television, as well as video games and graphic novels. An essential element of historical fiction is that it is set in the past and pays attention to the manners, social conditions and other details of the period depicted.[1] Authors also frequently choose to explore notable historical figures in these settings, allowing readers to better understand how these individuals might have responded to their environments
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Sharpe's Tiger
Sharpe's Tiger
Sharpe's Tiger
is the first historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell
Bernard Cornwell
and was first published in 1997. Sharpe is a private in the British army serving in India at Seringapatam.Contents1 Place of novel in series 2 Plot summary 3 Characters 4 Publication history 5 External linksPlace of novel in series[edit] Main article: Sharpe (novel series) The first, chronologically, of the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell
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Sharpe's Triumph
Sharpe's Triumph
Sharpe's Triumph
is the second historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell, first published in 1998. Sharpe is a sergeant in the army who attracts the attention of General Arthur Wellesley at Ahmednuggur.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Characters in " Sharpe's Triumph
Sharpe's Triumph
" 3 Release details 4 External linksPlot summary[edit] Sergeant Richard Sharpe and a small detachment of men arrive at an isolated East India Company fort to collect ammunition for the armory at Seringapatam. Whilst Sharpe and his men rest, a company of East India Company Sepoys arrive under the command of Lieutenant William Dodd. Dodd abruptly orders his men to parade and then fire on the company troops, instigating a massacre
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The Starbuck Chronicles
The Starbuck Chronicles are a series of historical fiction novels by British author Bernard Cornwell
Bernard Cornwell
set during the American Civil War. They follow the exploits of a young Boston-born Confederate officer, Nathaniel Starbuck. Four novels have been written; the series is still unfinished due to Cornwell's commitment to other projects, however he has stated on many occasions he wishes to ret
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