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Shangri-la
Shangri-La
Shangri-La
is a fictional place described in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton. Hilton describes Shangri-La
Shangri-La
as a mystical, harmonious valley, gently guided from a lamasery, enclosed in the western end of the Kunlun Mountains. Shangri-La
Shangri-La
has become synonymous with any earthly paradise, particularly a mythical Himalayan utopia – a permanently happy land, isolated from the world. In the novel, the people who live at Shangri-La
Shangri-La
are almost immortal, living hundreds of years beyond the normal lifespan and only very slowly ageing in appearance
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Wuling
Wuling may refer to: King Wuling of Zhao
King Wuling of Zhao
(趙武靈王), reigned in the State of Zhao during the Warring States Period Wuling Motors, an automotive manufacturer in China
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Qin Dynasty
Huang-LaoHuangdi Sijing HuainanziEarly figuresGuan Zhong Zichan Deng Xi Li Kui Wu QiFounding figuresShen Buhai Duke Xiao of Qin Shang Yang Shen Dao Zhang Yi Xun Kuang Han Fei Li Si Qin Shi HuangHan figuresJia Yi Liu An Emperor Wen of Han Emperor Wu of Han Chao Cuo Gongsun Hong Zhang Tang Huan Tan Wang Fu Zhuge LiangLater figuresEmperor Wen of Sui Du You Wang Anshi Li Shanchang Zhang Juzheng Xu Guangqiv t eHistory of ChinaANCIENTNeolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BC Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
c. 2070 – c. 1600 BC Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
c. 1600 – c. 1046 BC Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
c
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Lobsang Palden Yeshe, 6th Panchen Lama
Lobsang Palden Yeshe (1738–1780) (Tibetan: བློ་བཟང་དཔལ་ལྡན་ཡེ་ཤེས་་, Wylie: Blo-bzang Gpal-ldan Ye-shes, ZYPY: Lobsang Baidain Yêxê) was the sixth Panchen Lama
Panchen Lama
of Tashilhunpo Monastery
Tashilhunpo Monastery
in Tibet. He was the elder stepbrother of the 10th Shamarpa, Mipam Chödrup Gyamtso (1742–1793). The Panchen Lama
Panchen Lama
was distinguished by his writings and interest in the world. In 1762 he gave the Eighth Dalai Lama
Eighth Dalai Lama
his pre-novice ordination at the Potala
Potala
Palace and named him Jamphel Gyatso.[1] He befriended George Bogle, a Scottish adventurer and diplomat who had made an expedition to Tibet
Tibet
and stayed at Tashilhunpo Monastery
Tashilhunpo Monastery
in Shigatse
Shigatse
from 1774-1775
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Ngari
Ngari Prefecture
Ngari Prefecture
(Tibetan: མངའ་རིས་ས་ཁུལ་, Wylie: mnga' ris sa khul; simplified Chinese: 阿里地区; traditional Chinese: 阿里地區; pinyin: Ālǐ Dìqū) is a prefecture of China's Tibet Autonomous Region. Its capital is Gar County. Its administrative centre is the town of Burang Town. The largest settlement is Shiquanhe. Ngari Prefecture
Ngari Prefecture
includes part of the Aksai Chin
Aksai Chin
area, a disputed region claimed by India but over which China exercises administrative control. The paved Xinjiang- Tibet
Tibet
Highway (新藏公路) passes through this area. There are well-known prehistoric petroglyphs near the far western town of Rutog. The town of Ngari lies 4,500 metres (14,800 ft) above sea level in northwest Tibet
Tibet
some 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) west of the capital, Lhasa
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Altai Mountains
Coordinates: 49°N 89°E / 49°N 89°E / 49; 89Altai MountainsMap of the Altai mountain rangeChinese nameSimplified Chinese 阿尔泰山脉Traditional Chinese 阿爾泰山脈TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Ā'ěrtài ShānmàiMongolian nameMongolian Алтайн нуруу/Altain nurûRussian nameRussian АлтайRomanization AltayKazakh nameKazakh Алтай таулары/Altai’ tay’lary/التاي تاۋلارىUyghur nameUyghur Altay Taghliri/ئالتاي تاغلىرىThe Altai Mountains
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Gora Belukha
Belukha Mountain
Belukha Mountain
(Russian: Белуха, lit "whitey"; Altai: Muztau or Üç Sümer), located in the Katun Mountains, is the highest peak of the Altai Mountains
Altai Mountains
in Russia.[2] It is part of the World Heritage Site entitled Golden Mountains of Altai.[3] Located in the Altai Republic, Belukha is a three-peaked mountain massif that rises along the border of Russia
Russia
and Kazakhstan, just a few dozen miles north of the point where this border meets with the border of China. There are several small glaciers on the mountain, including Belukha Glacier. Of the two peaks, the eastern peak (4,506 m, 14,784 ft.) is higher than the western peak (4,440 m, 14,567 ft.). Belukha was first climbed in 1914 by the Tronov brothers. Most ascents of the eastern peak follow the same southern route as that taken in the first ascent
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Kun Lun Mountains
The Kunlun Mountains
Kunlun Mountains
(simplified Chinese: 昆仑山; traditional Chinese: 崑崙山; pinyin: Kūnlún Shān, pronounced [kʰu̯ə́nlu̯ə̌n ʂán]; Mongolian: Хөндлөн Уулс, Khöndlön Uuls) are one of the longest mountain chains in Asia, extending more than 3,000 kilometres (1,900 mi). In the broadest sense, it forms the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
south of the Tarim Basin. The exact definition of this range varies. An old source[1] uses Kunlun to mean the mountain belt that runs across the center of China, that is, Kunlun in the narrow sense: Altyn Tagh
Altyn Tagh
along with the Qilian and Qin Mountains. A recent source[2] has the Kunlun range forming most of the south side of the Tarim Basin
Tarim Basin
and then continuing east south of the Altyn Tagh
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Evariste Regis Huc
Évariste Régis Huc, C.M., or the Abbé
Abbé
Huc,* [1] (1813–1860) was a French missionary Catholic priest
Catholic priest
and traveller, famous for his accounts of China, Tartary
Tartary
and Tibet, in his book "A Journey Through the Chinese Empire". Since the travels of the Englishman Thomas Manning[2] in Tibet
Tibet
(1811–1812),[3] no European had visited Lhasa. Huc stimulated European interest in Central Asia and blazed a trail for Asian studies.Contents1 Early life 2 Tibet 3 Reflections 4 Works 5 Literature 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Huc was born in Caylus, Tarn-et-Garonne
Caylus, Tarn-et-Garonne
in France on August 1, 1813. When he was 24, he entered the Congregation of the Mission
Congregation of the Mission
(also known as Vincentians) at Paris
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Jin Dynasty (265-420)
The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire
Empire
(/dʒɪn/;[2] Chinese: 晉朝; pinyin: Jìn Cháo, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin or Liang Jin) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from AD 265 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, son of Sima Zhao who was made Prince of Jin and posthumously declared the founder of the dynasty. It followed the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220-280 AD), which ended with the conquest of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
by the Jin. There are two main divisions in the history of the dynasty
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Kham
Kham
Kham
(Tibetan: ཁམས, Wylie: khams; Chinese: 康; pinyin: Kāng) is a historical region of Tibet
Tibet
covering a land area largely divided between present-day Tibet Autonomous Region
Tibet Autonomous Region
and Sichuan, with smaller portions located within Qinghai, Gansu
Gansu
and Yunnan
Yunnan
provinces of China. During the Republic of China's rule over mainland China (1911–1949), most of the region was administratively part of Xikang (Chinese: 西康). It held the status of "special administrative district"[according to whom?] until 1939, when it became an official Chinese province. Its provincial status was nominal and without much cohesion, like most of China's territory during the time of Japanese invasion and civil war
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Hunza Valley
The Hunza (Burushaski: ہنزو , Wakhi, and Urdu: ہنزہ‬‎) is a mountainous valley in the Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan
region of Pakistan. The Hunza is situated in the extreme northern part of Pakistan, bordering with the Wakhan Corridor
Wakhan Corridor
of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
and the Xinjiang
Xinjiang
region of China.Contents1 History1.1 Mir/Tham 1.2 2010 landslide2 Geography2.1 Gojal
Gojal
Valley 2.2 Lower Hunza 2.3 Central Hunza3 People 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: State of Hunza Hunza was formerly a princely state bordering Xinjiang
Xinjiang
(autonomous region of China) to the northeast and Pamir to the northwest, which survived until 1974, when it was finally dissolved by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto
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Pakistan
Coordinates: 30°N 70°E / 30°N 70°E / 30; 70 Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Pakistan اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاكِستان‬ (Urdu) Islāmī Jumhūriyah Pākistān[1]FlagEmblemMotto: Īmān, Ittihād, Nazam ایمان، اتحاد، نظم‬ (Urdu) "Faith, Unity, Discipline" [2]Anthem: Qaumī Tarānah قَومی ترانہ‬ "The National Anthem"[3]Area controlled by
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