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Shan Ruling House
Saopha, Sao Pha, Chaopha, Jaopha, sawbwa, or saw-bwa (စော်ဘွား, pronounced [sɔ̀ bwá]; Shan: ၸဝ်ႈၾႃႉ, literally meaning "lord of the heavens"[1] or "lord of the sky"[2]) was a royal title used by the hereditary rulers of the semi-independent Shan States
Shan States
(Mong, Shan: မိူင်း, pronounced [mə́ŋ]) in what today is Eastern Myanmar
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Sawbwa Barb
The sawbwa barb (Sawbwa resplendens), also known as the Burmese rammy nose, Asian rummynose or rummynose rasbora, is an endangered species of cyprinid fish in the monotypic genus Sawbwa.[1][2] The species is endemic to Inle Lake in Myanmar (Burma).[3] It grows to a maximum total length of 3.5 cm (1.4 in).[2] Mature males are iridescent silvery-blue with red snout and red lobes to the tail fin; females are duller without red and with a dark pigmentation spot by the anus.[2] The sawbwa barb completely lacks scales.[citation needed] References[edit]^ a b Vidthayanon, C. (2011). "Sawbwa resplendens". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2011: e.T180647A7649175. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2011-1.RLTS.T180647A7649175.en. Retrieved 15 January 2018.  ^ a b c "Sawbwa resplendens". Seriouslyfish. Retrieved 19 March 2017.  ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2017). "Sawbwa resplendens" in FishBase
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Mongpai
Mongpai was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Central Division of the Southern Shan States.[1] References[edit]^ Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 17, p. 406.Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Mongnawng State
Mongnawng (also known as Möngnawng or Maingnaung) was a large Shan state in what is today Burma. Mongnawng was bound by Kengtung State
Kengtung State
in the east. The Nam Pang, an important river, crossed the state from north to south. Its capital was Mong Nawng.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Myozas2 ReferencesHistory[edit] Mongnawng became independent from Hsenwi
Hsenwi
in 1851 under the rulership of the myoza Heng Awn. It was a tributary of the Burmese Kingdom
Burmese Kingdom
until 1887, when the Shan states
Shan states
submitted to British rule after the fall of the Konbaung dynasty.[2] Rulers[edit] The rulers of Mongnawng bore the title of Myoza.[3] Myozas[edit]1851 - 1866 Heng Awn (d. 1866) 1866 - 1868 Hkun Hkang (d. 1868) 1868 - 9 Aug 1906 Hkun Tun (b. 1858 - d. 1906) 9 Aug 1906 - 19.. Hkun Long (b. 1851 - d
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Mongnai State
Mongnai, also known as Möngnai, Mone, Mōng Nai or Monē,[1] was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Eastern Division of the Southern Shan States.[1] Its capital was Mongnai
Mongnai
town.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers (title Myoza) 1.2 Rulers (title Saopha)2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Möngnai state was founded before 1800. According to tradition a predecessor state named Saturambha had existed previously in the area.[3] Mongnai
Mongnai
included the substates of Kengtawng[1] and Kenghkam. The latter was annexed in 1882.[citation needed] Rulers (title Myoza)[edit]c.1802 – 1848: Maung Shwe Paw 1848 – 1850: Maung Yit 1850 – 1851: U Po Ka 1852: U Shwe KyuRulers (title Saopha)[edit] Ritual style Kambawsa Rahta Mahawunthiri Pawara Thudamaraza.[4]1852 – 1875: Hkun Nu Nom 1875 – 1882: Hkun Kyi (1st time) (1847–1914) 1882 – 1888: Twet Nga Lu (usurper) (d
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Mongpan State
Mongpan or Möngpan was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Eastern Division of the Southern Shan States. The town of Mong Pan was formerly the residence of the Sawbwa of Mongpan State. The capital is in the middle of a fertile plain. Most of the other areas of the state are mountainous, rich in teak forests. Loi Hkilek, a 2,133 high mountain is located in Mongkyawt District.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Myozas 1.1.2 Saophas2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] According to legend there had been a predecessor state. Mongpan state was founded in 1637, but little is known of the history of the state before the times of British Burma.[1] The four districts of Mongtang, Monghang, Mongkyawt and Monghta, located east of the Salween were historically claimed by Siam, but the British upheld the view that they belonged to the Cis-Salween Sawbwa of Mongpan
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Mongpawn
Mongpawn
Mongpawn
or Möngpawn (Burmese: Maingpan) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. The state was part of the Eastern Division of the Southern Shan States
Shan States
and was located south of Laihka State
Laihka State
in the valley of the Nam Pawn river.Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Myozas 1.1.2 Saophas2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] According to tradition a predecessor state in the area was named Rajjavadi. Möngpawn state was founded in 1816 under the overlordship of Mongnai State. Historically Mongpawn
Mongpawn
played an important part before the British annexation of Upper Burma, at the time of the Burmese resistance movement 1885–95
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Mongsit
Mongsit
Mongsit
or Möngsit (also known as Maingseik) was small state of the Shan States
Shan States
in what is today Burma.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Myozas2 ReferencesHistory[edit] The capital and residence of the Myoza was Mongsit
Mongsit
town, located in the northern part of the state and with 1,223 inhabitants according to the 1901 Census of India. The northern half of Mongsit
Mongsit
was irrigated by the Nam Teng and the southern by the Nam Pawn[2] Rulers[edit] The rulers of Mongsit
Mongsit
bore the title of Myoza.[3] Myozas[edit]1816 - 18.. .... 18.. - 1857 Sao Haw Pik 1857 - 18.. Hkun Kyaw San 18.. - 1873 Hkun Lu 1873 - 1876 Nang Li (f) 1873 - 1876 Hkam Yi -Regent (1st time) 1876 - 1880 Sao Leng Leong 1880 - 1883 Hkam Yi -Regent (2nd time) 1883 - .... Hkam Pwin (b. 1861 - d
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Hopong State
Hopong
Hopong
(Burmese: Hopon) was a Shan state in the Central Division of the Southern Shan States
Shan States
in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Hsatung
Hsatung (also known as Hsahtung or Thaton) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. Hsatung was a tributary of Burma
Burma
until 1887, when the Shan states submitted to British rule after the fall of the Konbaung dynasty. The capital was formerly Laip but then was moved to Hsihseng, Nam Pawn valley, about 70 km south of Hopong. It became a part of the unified Shan State
Shan State
within Burma
Burma
in 1947. Sao Aung Myint, the last real myoza of Hsatung, died in the 1940s. His son abdicated and surrendered his powers to the Burmese government on 29 April 1959
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Laihka State
Laihka State
Laihka State
(Burmese: Legya) was a state in the central division of the Southern Shan States
Shan States
of Burma, with an area of 3711 km². The general character of the state was hilly and broken, with a mean altitude of a little under 3000 ft. The main rivers were the Nam Teng, an important tributary of the Salween, and the Nam Pawn. Laihka, located in the plain of the Nam Teng, was the capital where the saopha had his palace (haw).[1] The town of Panglong, where the Panglong Agreement took place, is located close to Laihka.Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Myosas 1.1.2 Saohpa2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Traditional legends talk about a predecessor kingdom in the area named Hansavadi. Laihka State
Laihka State
was founded in 1505 as a state subordinated to Hsenwi
Hsenwi
State
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Lawksawk State
Lawksawk
Lawksawk
(Yatsawk)[1]was a Shan state in what is today Burma.[2] It was located north of Myelat
Myelat
and belonged to the Central Division of the Southern Shan States. Its capital was Lawksawk
Lawksawk
town. The state included 397 villages and the population was mostly Shan, but there were also Danu, Pa-O and Palaung people
Palaung people
in the area.[3]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers (title Saopha)2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Lawksawk
Lawksawk
State was founded in 1630
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Mongping State
Mongping or Möngping (Burmese: Maingpyin) was small state of the Shan States in what is today Burma. History[edit] Little is known about the history of this state except that in 1842 it was merged with Lawksawk.[1] It was located at the southeastern end of that state, separated from it by the Nam Et River. Rulers[edit]1835 - 1842 Hkam Hlaing 1842 - .... Hkam KawReferences[edit]^ Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma"
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Namhkok
Namhkok (also known as Nankok) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010. Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "The Imperial Gazetteer of India". Digital South Asia Library, University of Chicago
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Mongkung State
Mongkung or Möngküng (Burmese: Maingkaing) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Eastern Division of the Southern Shan States. Its capital was Mong Kung, in the valley of the Nam Teng. The largest minority were Palaung people.Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Saophas and Myozas2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Mongkung state was founded in ancient times as Langkavadi. In 1835, after the British annexed Upper Burma
Burma
and established their rule in the region, Mongkung had been formerly a feudatory state of Hsenwi.[1] Rulers[edit] The rulers of Mongkung bore the title Myoza in 1835-54 and 1863–73; Saopha
Saopha
in 1854-63 and from 1873.[2] Saophas and Myozas[edit]1835 - 1860 Hkun Long (d. 1860) 1860 - 1863 Hkun Long II 1863 - 1873 Gu Na (d. 1873) 1873 - 1879 Hkun San Kwan 1879 - .... Hkun Mong (b. 1873 - d
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Nawngwawn
Nawngwawn (also known as Naungwun or Naungmon) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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