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Shakespeare's
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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William Shakespeare (other)
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
was a playwright. William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
may also refer to:People
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Alderman
An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions founded upon English law
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National Portrait Gallery, London
1,949,330 (2016)[1][2]Ranked 11th nationally Ranked 22nd art museum globally (2014)[1]Director Nicholas Cullinan[3]Public transit access Charing Cross Charing Cross; Leicester Square; EmbankmentWebsite npg.org.ukThe National Portrait
Portrait
Gallery (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people. It was the first portrait gallery in the world when it opened in 1856.[4] The gallery moved in 1896 to its current site at St Martin's Place, off Trafalgar Square, and adjoining the National Gallery. It has been expanded twice since then. The National Portrait Gallery also has regional outposts at Beningbrough Hall
Beningbrough Hall
in Yorkshire and Montacute House
Montacute House
in Somerset
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Modern Language
A modern language is any human language that is currently in use.[clarification needed] The term is used in language education to distinguish between languages which are used for day-to-day communication (such as French and German) and dead classical languages such as Latin
Latin
and Classical Chinese, which are studied for their cultural or linguistic value.[citation needed] SIL Ethnologue
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Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revolution 11 December 1688 
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Narrative Poem
Narrative poetry
Narrative poetry
is a form of poetry that tells a story, often making the voices of a narrator and characters as well; the entire story is usually written in metered verse. Narrative poems do not have to follow rhythmic patterns. The poems that make up this genre may be short or long, and the story it relates to may be complex. It is normally dramatic, with objectives, diverse and meter.[1] Narrative poems include epics, ballads, idylls, and lays. Some narrative poetry takes the form of a novel in verse. An example of this is The Ring and the Book
The Ring and the Book
by Robert Browning. In terms of narrative poetry, a romance is a narrative poem that tells a story of chivalry. Examples include the Romance of the Rose or Tennyson's Idylls of the King
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Playwright
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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Poet
A poet is a person who creates poetry. Poets may describe themselves as such or be described as such by others. A poet may simply be a writer of poetry, or may perform their art to an audience.Postmortal fictional portrait of Slovak poet Janko Kráľ
Janko Kráľ
(1822-1876) - an idealized romanticized picture of "how a real poet should look" in Western culture.The Italian Giacomo Leopardi
Giacomo Leopardi
was mentioned by the University of Birmingham as "one of the most radical and challenging of nineteenth-century thinkers".[1]The work of a poet is essentially one of communication, either expressing ideas in a literal sense, such as writing about a specific event or place, or metaphorically
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Shakespeare's Collaborations
Collaboration
Collaboration
occurs when two or more people or organizations work together to realize or achieve a goal.[1] Collaboration
Collaboration
is very similar to cooperation
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List Of National Poets
A national poet or national bard is a poet held by tradition and popular acclaim to represent the identity, beliefs and principles of a particular national culture.[1] The national poet as culture hero is a long-standing symbol, to be distinguished from successive holders of a bureaucratically-appointed poet-laureate office. The idea and honoring of national poets emerged primarily during Romanticism, as a figure that helped consolidation of the nation states, as it provided validation of their ethno-linguistic groups.[1] Most national poets are historic figures, though a few contemporary writers working in relatively new or revived national literatures are also considered "national poets." Some nations may have more than one national poet; the idea of a single one is always a simplification
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Jacobean Era
The Jacobean era
Jacobean era
refers to the period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of James VI of Scotland
Scotland
(1567–1625),
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Baptism
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Mary Shakespeare
Mary Shakespeare, née Arden, (c. 1537–1608) was the mother of William Shakespeare. She was the daughter of Robert Arden. The Arden family had been prominent in Warwickshire since before the Norman Conquest. She was the youngest of 8 daughters, and she inherited her father's farm, now called Mary Arden's House, in Wilmcote, Warwickshire when Robert Arden died in December 1556. Richard Shakespeare, the father of John Shakespeare, was a tenant farmer on land owned by her father in Snitterfield
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Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms. Most often seen in dramatic literature, the term can variously describe either a tragic play which contains enough comic elements to lighten the overall mood or a serious play with a happy ending.[1]Contents1 Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
in theatre1.1 Classical precedent 1.2 Renaissance
Renaissance
revivals1.2.1 Italy 1.2.2 England 1.2.3 Later developments2 See also 3 References 4 External links Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
in theatre[edit] Classical precedent[edit]Tragic Comic masks of Ancient Greek theatre
Ancient Greek theatre
represented in the Hadrian's Villa
Hadrian's Villa
mosaic.There is no complete formal definition of tragicomedy from the classical age
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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