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Seychour Rugs
A subtype of the Kuba rug, antique Seychour (also known as Seichur and Zeychour) rugs are made in the small town of Yukhari-Zeykhur in Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
in the Northeast Caucasus. Prized for the detailed precision of their drawing and design as well as for their saturated colors, antique Seychour rugs popularly display designs such as cabbage rose and the Seychour cross. Differing from other Caucasian rugs, antique Seychour rugs do not share the same symmetry in their borders; they do however, share a similar flat-woven structure. In these particular rugs, one half of the knot is hidden. References[edit]Neff, Ivan C. and Carol V. Maggs. Dictionary of Oriental Rugs. London: AD. Donker LTD, 1977. ISBN 978-0-949937-35-3 Gans-Ruedin, E. Caucasian Carpets
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Jozan Rug
Jozan may refer to:Jozan, iconic character in Dungeons & Dragons Jozan, Iran (other) Jozan rug, made in the surroundings of the village Jozan Jozani Chwaka Bay National Park, a national park of Tanzania located on the island of ZanzibarThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Jozan. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Bidjar Rug
Rug
Rug
or RUG may refer to: Carpet
Carpet
or rug, a textile floor covering Rug
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Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
(/ˌæzərbaɪˈdʒɑːn/ AZ-ər-by-JAHN; Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan [ɑzæɾbɑjˈd͡ʒɑn]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
(Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan Respublikası [ɑzæɾbɑjˈd͡ʒɑn ɾespublikɑˈsɯ]), is a country in the South Caucasus
Caucasus
region of Eurasia
Eurasia
at the crossroads of Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and Western Asia.[7] It is bound by the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
to the east, Russia
Russia
to the north, Georgia to the northwest, Armenia
Armenia
to the west and Iran
Iran
to the south
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Caucasus
 Abkhazia Artsakh South OssetiaAutonomous republics and federal regions Russia Adygea  Chechnya  Dagestan  Ingushetia  Kabardino-Balkaria Karachay-Cherkessia  Krasnodar Krai North Ossetia-Alania  Stavropol Krai Georgia Adjara Abkhazia (since 2008, in exile) Azerbaijan NakhchivanDemonym CaucasianTime Zones UTC+02:00, UTC+03:00, UTC+03:30, UTC+4:00, UTC+04:30The Caucasus
Caucasus
/ˈkɔːkəsəs/ or Caucasia /kɔːˈkeɪʒə/ is a region located at the border of
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Alcaraz Rugs
Alcaraz
Alcaraz
is a municipality in the Spanish province of Albacete. Families worldwide have the surname "Alcaraz" may trace their ancestry to this part of Spain
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Shahsevan Rug
Shahsevan
Shahsevan
rug or Shahsevan
Shahsevan
Kilim
Kilim
is the Iranian Style, handmade by the Shahsevans in the Azerbaiajn region of Iran. See also[edit]Heriz rug Tabriz rug Ardabil carpetReferences[edit]Heshmati, Fazl-ollah. Iranian carpet. Tehran
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Kuba Rugs And Carpets
Quba rugs and carpets
Quba rugs and carpets
are named for a town that is located in Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
Republic not far from the Caspian Sea; therefore, making Kubas a sub-division of Caucasian carpets.1 Kuba is at
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Kurdish Rugs
Kurdish rugs
Kurdish rugs
(Kurdish: قالی کوردی‎) are rugs woven by the Kurdish people
Kurdish people
in the Middle East, predominantly the larger Kurdistan region including the Eastern part of
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Lilihan Carpets And Rugs
Armenians
Armenians
wove Lilihans in Lilihan village in what used to be called Kamareh (now Khomeyn) district in Iran. 1 The term Lilihan is better known in the US, in Europe
Europe
it is not as widely used.2Contents1 Structure 2 Design 3 Colour 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] Although a wide range of carpet and mat sizes are produced, the most common sizes found are 4 x 6 to 8 x 10 feet.3 The use of a longer pile traditionally appealed to Americans.4 The Lilihan rugs are executed using the Hamadan
Hamadan
(single-wefted) weave, typically this means that they have one heavy cotton weft and are made with thick, first quality wool. The Lilihan rugs are the only fabrics in the Sultanabad region to be single-wefted
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Mashhad Rug
A Persian carpet
Persian carpet
or Persian rug (Persian: قالی ايرانى qālī-ye īranī),[1] also known as Iranian carpet (Persian: فرش ايرانى‎ farsh, meaning "to spread"), is a heavy textile, made for a wide variety of utilitarian and symbolic purpose, produced in Iran
Iran
(historically known as Persia), for home use, local sale, and export. Carpet
Carpet
weaving is an essential part of Persian culture and Iranian art. Within the group of Oriental rugs produced by the countries of the so-called "rug belt", the Persian carpet
Persian carpet
stands out by the variety and elaborateness of its manifold designs. Persian carpets and rugs of various types were woven in parallel by nomadic tribes, in village and town workshops, and by royal court manufactories alike
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Nain Rug
Nain rugs are constructed using the Persian knot
Persian knot
and typically have between 300 and 700 knots per square inch.[citation needed] The pile is usually very high quality wool, clipped short, and silk is often used as highlighting for detail in the design.[citation needed] See also[edit]Knots per sq cmReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Nain rugs.v t eRugs and carpetsRugsAbadeh Afghan Ahar Alcaraz Arak Ardabil Azerbaijani Bakhtiari Bakshaish Baluch Bessarabian Bidjar Borujerd Braided Caucasian Dhurrie Flokati Heriz Isfahan Jozan Karadag
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Navajo Weaving
Navajo rugs and blankets (Navajo: diyogí) are textiles produced by Navajo people
Navajo people
of the Four Corners
Four Corners
area of the United States. Navajo textiles are highly regarded and have been sought after as trade items for over 150 years. Commercial production of handwoven blankets and rugs has been an important element of the Navajo economy. As one expert expresses it, "Classic Navajo serapes at their finest equal the delicacy and sophistication of any pre-mechanical loom-woven textile in the world."[1] Navajo textiles were originally utilitarian blankets for use as cloaks, dresses, saddle blankets, and similar purposes. Toward the end of the 19th century, weavers began to make rugs for tourism and export. Typical Navajo textiles have strong geometric patterns
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