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Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is an American educational children's television series that combines live action, sketch comedy, animation and puppetry. It is produced by Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
(formerly known as the Children's Television Workshop until June 2000) and was created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett. The program is known for its images communicated through the use of Jim Henson's Muppets, and includes short films, with humor and cultural references. The series premiered on November 10, 1969, to positive reviews, some controversy,[1] and high viewership; it has aired on the U.S.'s national public television provider PBS
PBS
since its debut, with its first run moving to premium channel HBO
HBO
on January 16, 2016.[2] The show has undergone significant changes in its history
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Stereo
Stereophonic sound
Stereophonic sound
or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). In the 2000s, stereo sound is common in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, and cinema.How stereophonic & duophonic sound systems work
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Dolby
Dolby Laboratories, Inc. (often shortened to Dolby Labs) is an American company specializing in audio noise reduction and audio encoding/compression. Dolby licenses its technologies to consumer electronics manufacturers.Contents1 History 2 Technologies2.1 Analog audio noise reduction 2.2 Audio encoding/compression 2.3 Audio processing 2.4 Video processing 2.5 Digital cinema 2.6 Live sound3 Dolby Surround
Dolby Surround
systems at a glance 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Dolby Labs was founded by American Ray Dolby
Ray Dolby
(1933–2013) in London, United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in 1965. In that same year he officially invented the Dolby Sound System, a form of audio signal processing. His first U.S. patent was not filed until 1969, four years later
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720p
720p
720p
(1280×720 px; also called HD Ready
HD Ready
or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1). All major HDTV broadcasting standards (such as SMPTE 292M) include a 720p format which has a resolution of 1280×720; however, there are other formats, including HDV
HDV
Playback and AVCHD
AVCHD
for camcorders, which use 720p
720p
images with the standard HDTV resolution
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1080i
1080i
1080i
(also known as Full HD or BT.709) is an abbreviation referring to a combination of frame resolution and scan type, used in high-definition television (HDTV) and high-definition video. The number "1080" refers to the number of horizontal lines on the screen. The "i" is an abbreviation for "interlaced"; this indicates that only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. A related display resolution is 1080p, which also has 1080 lines of resolution; the "p" refers to progressive scan, which indicates that the lines of resolution for each frame are "drawn" in on the screen sequence. The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9 (a rectangular TV that is wider than it is tall), so the 1080 lines of vertical resolution implies 1920 columns of horizontal resolution, or 1920 pixels × 1080 lines
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High-definition Television
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
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Emmy Awards
An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award (for film), the Tony Award
Tony Award
(for theatre), and the Grammy Award (for music).[1] Because Emmys are given in various sectors of the American television industry, they are presented in different annual ceremonies held throughout the year. The two events that receive the most media coverage are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards, which recognize outstanding work in American primetime and daytime entertainment programming, respectively. Other notable Emmy Award ceremonies are those honoring national sports programming, national news and documentary shows, national business and financial reporting, and technological and engineering achievements in television, including the Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards
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Grammy Awards
"Hello"Record of the Year "24K Magic"A Grammy Award
Grammy Award
(stylized as GRAMMY, originally called Gramophone Award), or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy
The Recording Academy
to recognize achievement in the mainly English-language music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest
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Monaural
Monaural
Monaural
or monophonic sound reproduction (often shortened to mono) is sound intended to be heard as if it were emanating from one position. This contrasts with stereophonic sound or stereo, which uses two separate audio channels to reproduce sound from two microphones on the right and left side, which is reproduced with two separate loudspeakers to give a sense of the direction of sound sources. In mono, only one loudspeaker is necessary, but, when played through multiple loudspeakers or headphones, identical signals are fed to each speaker, resulting in the perception of one-channel sound "imaging" in one sonic space between the speakers (provided that the speakers are set up in a proper symmetrical critical-listening placement). Monaural recordings, like stereo ones, typically use multiple microphones fed into multiple channels on a recording console, but each channel is "panned" to the center
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Preschoolers
A preschool, also known as nursery school, pre-primary school, playschool or kindergarten, is an educational establishment or learning space offering early childhood education to children before they begin compulsory education at primary school. It may be publicly or privately operated, and may be subsidized from public funds.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Origins 2.2 Spread3 Developmental areas 4 Funding 5 Advocacy 6 Curricula 7 National variations7.1 China 7.2 Turkey 7.3 Japan 7.4 North Korea 7.5 United States7.5.1 Head Start7.6 United Kingdom7.6.1 England 7.6.2 Wales 7.6.3 Northern Ireland 7.6.4 Scotland7.7 Ireland8 See also 9 References 10 Sources 11 Further reading 12 External linksTerminology[edit] Terminology varies by country
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
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Standard-definition Television
Standard-definition television
Standard-definition television
(SDTV or SD) is a television system which uses a resolution that's not considered to be either high-definition television (720p, 1080i, 1080p, 1440p, 4K UHDTV, and 8K UHD) or enhanced-definition television (EDTV 480p). The two common SDTV signal types are 576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution, derived from the European-developed PAL
PAL
and SECAM
SECAM
systems; and 480i based on the American National Television System Committee NTSC system
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Preschool Education
A preschool, also known as nursery school, pre-primary school, playschool or kindergarten, is an educational establishment or learning space offering early childhood education to children before they begin compulsory education at primary school. It may be publicly or privately operated, and may be subsidized from public funds.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Origins 2.2 Spread3 Developmental areas 4 Funding 5 Advocacy 6 Curricula 7 National variations7.1 China 7.2 Turkey 7.3 Japan 7.4 North Korea 7.5 United States7.5.1 Head Start7.6 United Kingdom7.6.1 England 7.6.2 Wales 7.6.3 Northern Ireland 7.6.4 Scotland7.7 Ireland8 See also 9 References 10 Sources 11 Further reading 12 External linksTerminology[edit] Terminology varies by country
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Royalties
A royalty is a payment made by one party, the licensee or franchisee to another that owns a particular asset, the licensor or franchisor for the right to ongoing use of that asset. Royalties are typically agreed upon as a percentage of gross or net revenues derived from the use of an asset or a fixed price per unit sold of an item of such, but there are also other modes and metrics of compensation.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] A royalty interest is the right to collect a stream of future royalty payments.[8] A license agreement defines the terms under which a resource or property are licensed by one party to another, either without restriction or subject to a limitation on term, business or geographic territory, type of product, etc. License agreements can be regulated, particularly where a government is the resource owner, or they can be private contracts that follow a general structure
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Affective
Affect is a concept used in psychology to describe the experience of feeling or emotion. The term affect takes on a different meaning in other fields.[1] In psychology, affect mediates an organism's interaction with stimuli. The word also refers sometimes to affect display, which is "a facial, vocal, or gestural behavior that serves as an indicator of affect" (APA 2006). The affective domain represents one of the three divisions described in modern psychology: the cognitive, the conative, and the affective. Classically, these divisions have also been referred to as the "ABC of psychology",[citation needed] in that case using the terms "affect", "behavior", and "cognition". In certain views, the cognitive may be considered as a part of the affective, or the affective as a part of the cognitive; [2] it is important to note that "cognitive and affective states … [are] merely analytic categories". [3] Affective states are psycho-physiological constructs
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Animation
Animation
Animation
is a dynamic medium in which images or objects are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation the images were drawn (or painted) by hand on cels to be photographed and exhibited on film. Nowadays most animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation
Computer animation
can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets or clay figures. The stop motion technique where live actors are used as a frame-by-frame subject is known as pixilation. Commonly the effect of animation is achieved by a rapid succession of sequential images that minimally differ from each other
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