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Sesame Oil
Sesame
Sesame
oil is an edible vegetable oil derived from sesame seeds. Besides being used as a cooking oil in South India, it is used as a flavour enhancer in Middle Eastern, African, and Southeast Asian cuisines
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Food Energy
Food
Food
energy is chemical energy that animals (including humans) derive from food through the process of cellular respiration. Cellular respiration may either involve the chemical reaction of food molecules with molecular oxygen[1] (aerobic respiration) or the process of reorganizing the food molecules without additional oxygen (anaerobic respiration).Contents1 Overview 2 Nutrition
Nutrition
labels 3 Recommended daily intake 4 Energy usage in the human body 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Humans and other animals need a minimum intake of food energy to sustain their metabolism and to drive their muscles. Foods are composed chiefly of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water represent virtually all the weight of food, with vitamins and minerals making up only a small percentage of the weight
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Tamil Nadu
^# Jana Gana Mana
Jana Gana Mana
is the national anthem, while "Invocation to Tamil Mother" is the state song/anthem. ^† Established in 1773; Madras State was formed in 1950 and renamed as Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
on 14 January 1969[9] ^^ Tamil is the official language of the state. English is declared as an additional official language for communication purposes.[8]SymbolsEmblem Srivilliputhur
Srivilliputhur
Andal templeLanguageTamilSong"Invocation to Goddess Tamil"DanceBharathanattiyamAnimalNilgiri tahrBirdEmerald doveFlowerGloriosa lilyTreePalm treeSportKabaddi Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
(Tamil pronunciation: [t̪amiɻ n̪aːᶑu] ( listen) literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India. Its capital and largest city is Chennai
Chennai
(formerly known as Madras)
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Alternative Medicine
Alternative medicine
Alternative medicine
or fringe medicine are practices claimed to have the healing effects of medicine but which are disproven, unproven, impossible to prove, or are excessively harmful in relation to their effect. Scientific consensus states that such therapies do not, or cannot, work because the known laws of nature are violated by their basic claims; or that the treatment is so much worse that its use is unethical. Alternative therapies or diagnoses are not part of medicine or science-based healthcare systems. Alternative practices, products, and therapies – range from plausible but not well tested, to having known harmful and toxic effects. Large amounts of funding go to testing alternative medicine, with more than US$2.5 billion spent by the United States government alone.[1] Almost none show any effect beyond that of false treatment, and most positive studies have been shown to be statistical flukes
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Shirodhara
Shirodhara is a form of Ayurveda therapy that involves gently pouring liquids over the forehead and can be one of the steps involved in Panchakarma. The name comes from the Sanskrit words shiro (head) and dhara (flow). The liquids used in shirodhara depend on what is being treated, but can include oil, milk, buttermilk, coconut water, or even plain water. Shirodhara has been used to treat a variety of conditions including eye diseases, sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, greying of hair, neurological disorders, memory loss, insomnia, hearing impairment, tinnitus, vertigo, Ménière's disease and certain types of skin diseases like psoriasis. It is also used non-medicinally at spas for its relaxing properties. Studies report that Ayurvedic Shirodhara is a safe option to improve sleep quality among people who have sleep problems.[2] Shirodhara is also effective in treating mental conditions such as anxiety, and mental stress
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Oil Pulling
Oil pulling is an alternative medical practice in which oil is "swished" around the mouth. The claims made for the benefits of oil pulling are implausible, and there is no good evidence that it is of any health benefit.[1][2][3] Practitioners of oil pulling claim it is capable of improving oral and systemic health, including a benefit in conditions such as headaches, migraines, diabetes mellitus, asthma, and acne, as well as whitening teeth.[4] Some of its promoters claim it works by "pulling out" toxins, which are known as ama in Ayurvedic medicine, and thereby reducing inflammation
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Fatty Acid
In chemistry, particularly in biochemistry, a fatty acid is a carboxylic acid with a long aliphatic chain, which is either saturated or unsaturated. Most naturally occurring fatty acids have an unbranched chain of an even number of carbon atoms, from 4 to 28.[1] Fatty acids are usually derived from triglycerides or phospholipids. Fatty acids are important dietary sources of fuel for animals because, when metabolized, they yield large quantities of ATP. Many cell types can use either glucose or fatty acids for this purpose
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Palmitic Acid
Palmitic acid, or hexadecanoic acid in IUPAC nomenclature, is the most common saturated fatty acid found in animals, plants and microorganisms.[9] Its chemical formula is CH3(CH2)14COOH, and its C:D is 16:0. As its name indicates, it is a major component of the oil from the fruit of oil palms (palm oil). Palmitic acid
Palmitic acid
can also be found in meats, cheeses, butter, and dairy products. Palmitate is the salts and esters of palmitic acid. The palmitate anion is the observed form of palmitic acid at physiologic pH (7.4). Aluminium
Aluminium
salts of palmitic acid and naphthenic acid were combined during World War II
World War II
to produce napalm
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Stearic Acid
Stearic acid
Stearic acid
(/ˈstɪərɪk/ STEER-ik, /ˈstɪ.æ.rɪk/ stee-ARR-ik) is a saturated fatty acid with an 18-carbon chain and has the IUPAC name octadecanoic acid. It is a waxy solid and its chemical formula is C17H35CO2H. Its name comes from the Greek word στέαρ "stéar", which means tallow. The salts and esters of stearic acid are called stearates. As its ester, stearic acid is one of the most common saturated fatty acids found in nature following palmitic acid.[9] The triglyceride derived from three molecules of stearic acid is called stearin.Contents1 Production 2 Uses2.1 Soaps, cosmetics, detergents 2.2 Lubricants, softening and release agents 2.3 Niche uses3 Metabolism 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksProduction[edit] Stearic acid
Stearic acid
is obtained from fats and oils by the saponification of the triglycerides using hot water (about 100 °C)
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Indus Valley
The Indus River
Indus River
(also called the Sindhū or Abāsīn) is one of the longest rivers in Asia. Originating in the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
in the vicinity of Lake Manasarovar
Lake Manasarovar
(China), the river runs a course through the Ladakh
Ladakh
region of Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir
(India), towards Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan
and the Hindukush ranges, and then flows in a southerly direction along the entire length of Pakistan
Pakistan
to merge into the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
near the port city of Karachi
Karachi
in Sindh.[1][2] It is the longest river and national river of Pakistan.[3] The river has a total drainage area exceeding 1,165,000 km2 (450,000 sq mi)
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Seongnam
Seongnam
Seongnam
(Korean pronunciation: [sʌŋ.nam]) is the second largest city in South Korea's Gyeonggi Province
Gyeonggi Province
after Suwon
Suwon
and the 10th largest city in the country. Its population is approximately one million. Seongnam
Seongnam
is a satellite city of Seoul. It is largely a residential city located immediately southeast of Seoul
Seoul
and belongs to the Seoul
Seoul
National Capital Area. Seongnam, the first planned city in Korea's history, was conceived during the era of President Park Chung-Hee
Park Chung-Hee
for the purpose of industrializing the nation by concentrating electronic, textile, and petrochemical facilities there during the 1970s and 1980s. The city featured a network of roads, to Seoul
Seoul
and other major cities, from the early 1970s on
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Gyeonggi Province
Gyeonggi-do (Hangul: 경기도, Korean pronunciation: [kjʌŋ.ɡi.do]) is the most populous province in South Korea. Its name, Gyeonggi means "the area surrounding capital". Thus Gyeonggi-do can be translated as "province surrounding Seoul". The provincial capital is Suwon. Seoul—South Korea's largest city and national capital—is in the heart of the province but has been separately administered as a provincial-level special city since 1946. Incheon—South Korea's third-largest city—is on the coast of the province and has been similarly administered as a provincial-level metropolitan city since 1981
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Dehiscence (botany)
Dehiscence is the splitting, at maturity, along a built-in line of weakness in a plant structure in order to release its contents, and is common among fruits, anthers and sporangia. Sometimes this involves the complete detachment of a part. Structures that open in this way are said to be dehiscent. Structures that do not open in this way are called indehiscent, and rely on other mechanisms such as decay or predation to release the contents. A similar process to dehiscence occurs in some flower buds (e.g., Platycodon, Fuchsia), but this is rarely referred to as dehiscence unless circumscissile dehiscence is involved; anthesis is the usual term for the opening of flowers. Dehiscence may or may not involve the loss of a structure through the process of abscission
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Carbohydrate
A carbohydrate is a biomolecule consisting of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms, usually with a hydrogen–oxygen atom ratio of 2:1 (as in water); in other words, with the empirical formula Cm(H2O)n (where m may be different from n).[1] This formula holds true for monosaccharides. Some exceptions exist; for example, deoxyribose, a sugar component of DNA,[2] has the empirical formula C5H10O4.[3] The carbohydrates are technically hydrates of carbon;[4] structurally it is more accurate to view them as aldoses and ketoses .[5] The term is most common in biochemistry, where it is a synonym of 'saccharide', a group that includes sugars, starch, and cellulose. The saccharides are divided into four chemical groups: monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides
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Indehiscent
Dehiscence is the splitting, at maturity, along a built-in line of weakness in a plant structure in order to release its contents, and is common among fruits, anthers and sporangia. Sometimes this involves the complete detachment of a part. Structures that open in this way are said to be dehiscent. Structures that do not open in this way are called indehiscent, and rely on other mechanisms such as decay or predation to release the contents. A similar process to dehiscence occurs in some flower buds (e.g., Platycodon, Fuchsia), but this is rarely referred to as dehiscence unless circumscissile dehiscence is involved; anthesis is the usual term for the opening of flowers. Dehiscence may or may not involve the loss of a structure through the process of abscission
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