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Serra Malagueta
Serra da Malagueta
Serra da Malagueta
is a mountain located in the northern part of the island of Santiago, Cape Verde. At 1064 m elevation,[1] it is the second highest peak of Santiago island, after Pico da Antónia
Pico da Antónia
(1394 m), also that mountain is separated by 15.7 km. The mountain and its ranges forms a part of Serra da Malagueta
Serra da Malagueta
Natural Park (Eco Serra Malagueta or Parco Natural de Serra da Malagueta), established on February 24, 2005 and covers 774 hectares. It is situated on the border of the municipalities Tarrafal, São Miguel and Santa Catarina. The mountain range dominates the north of the island stretching from Poilão in Santa Cruz up to the vicinity of Tarrafal. Its name etymology is from a plant (Capsicum), a variety of pepper, the "Malagueta pepper"
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Umbilicus Schmidtii
Umbilicus schmidtii, Cape Verdean navelwort, is a flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to the Cape Verde Islands, it is an endemic plant and is listed as endangered by the IUCN.Contents1 Description 2 Related taxa 3 Distribution and ecology 4 The genus 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Umbilicus schmidtii is an unbranched erect perennial herb up to 25 cm high, glabrous in all parts. Basal leaves orbicular, peltate, up to 6 cm in diameter, somewhat succulent, margin slightly crenate to almost entire, petioles long. Cauline leaves smaller, shortly petiolated to almost sessile. Inflorescence long many flowered terminal raceme. Calyx much shorter than the corolla. Corolla brownish yellow, tubular; lobes short, lanceolate, acuminate. Related taxa[edit] The species is fairy similar to the Mediterranean Umbilicus horizontalis and also resembles the African U. botryoides. The taxonomic significance of U
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Pliocene
The Pliocene
Pliocene
( /ˈplaɪəˌsiːn/;[2][3] also Pleiocene[4]) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58[5] million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Pliocene
Pliocene
follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Epoch. Prior to the 2009 revision of the geologic time scale, which placed the four most recent major glaciations entirely within the Pleistocene, the Pliocene
Pliocene
also included the Gelasian stage, which lasted from 2.588 to 1.806 million years ago, and is now included in the Pleistocene.[6] As with other older geologic periods, the geological strata that define the start and end are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain
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Lantana Camara
Lantana
Lantana
aculeata L.[2] Camara vulgaris[3] Lantana
Lantana
camara, also known as big-sage (Malaysia), wild-sage, red-sage, white-sage (Caribbean) and tickberry (South Africa),[4] is a species of flowering pl
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Furcraea Foetida
Furcraea foetida (Giant Cabuya, Green-aloe or Mauritius-hemp) is a species of flowering plant native to the Caribbean and northern South America. It is widely cultivated and reportedly naturalized in many places (India, parts of Africa, Portugal, Australia, Thailand, Florida, and many oceanic islands)[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23] Description[edit]Plant with bulbilsFurcraea foetida is an evergreen perennial subshrub, stemless or with a short stem up to 1 m tall. The leaves are sword-shaped, 1-1.8 m long and 10–15 cm broad at their widest point, narrowing to 6–7 cm broad at the leaf base, and to a sharp spine tip at the apex; the margins are entire or with a few hooked spines
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Artemisia Gorgonum
Artemisia gorgonum (name etymology: Artemisia and mermaid) is a species of aster flowers that belong to the Asteraceae family. The species are endemic in Cape Verde. Its last form of the scientific name is gorgonum which rare resembles and shaped like mermaids. Its local name is called lorna or losna (sagebrush), officially in English as the Cape Verdean sagebrush. The plant plays a role in traditional medicine.Contents1 Variation 2 Distribution and ecology 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksVariation[edit] No significant variation has been observed. Old plants higher than 0.5–1 m are extremely rare today
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Campanula Jacobaea
Campanula jacobaea[2] is a species of bellflowers that belong to the Campanulaceae family. The species is endemic to Cape Verde and is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.[1] Its local name is called contra bruxa-azul', opposed to contra-bruxa-branca which is for Campanula bravensis (Brava bellflower).[3] The plant plays a role in traditional medicine .[3]Contents1 Distribution and ecology 2 Other 3 Notes 4 Further reading 5 External linksDistribution and ecology[edit] Campanula jacobaea are founded in the islands of Santo Antão, São Vicente, São Nicolau[4] and Santiago. The main altitudinal distribution is between 500 m and 1000 m. The plant is a mesophyte species and founded in humid and sub-humid areas.[1] Other[edit] Campanula jacobaea is featured on a Cape Verdean $5 escudo coin in 1994.[5] Campanula jacobaea can be founded at Jardim Botânico Nacional Grandvaux Barbosa in São Jorge dos Órgãos in eastern Santiago Island. Notes[edit]^ a b c "Campanula jacobaea"
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Echium Hypertropicum
Echium hypertropicum is a species of flowers that belong to the Boraginaceae family. The species are endemic in Cape Verde and is listed as endangered by the IUCN.[1][2] Its last form of the scientific name is related to being inside the tropics.[2] Together with Echium vulcanorum and Echium stenosiphon, its local name is lingua de vaca (cowtongue or cow-tongue) because of the texture of the leaves.[3] By its γ-linolenic acid, the plant are used for medicinal and dietary purposes.[4]Echium hypertropicum near Ribeira Principal in SantiagoContents1 Variation 2 Distribution and ecology 3 Other 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksVariation[edit] Old plants higher than 0.5–1 m are extremely rare today.[2] Distribution and ecology[edit] Artemisia gorgonum are founded in the Sotavento islands of Santiago (in the area of Ribeira Principal) and Brava
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Lavandula Rotundifolia
Lavandula
Lavandula
rotundifolia is a species of lavender flowers that belong to the Lamiaceae
Lamiaceae
family. The species is endemic to Cape Verde. Its last form of the scientific name means a rounded leaf
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Sideroxylon Marginata
Sideroxylon mermulana Banks ex Lowe [orth. var.]Sideroxylon mirmulano is a species of ironwood plant in the Sapotaceae family. It is found in Cape Verde, Madeira Islands (Portugal), and Canary Islands (Spain). It is threatened by habitat loss.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Other 4 SourcesDescription[edit] It is a tree or a shrub that grows up to 10 metres, its leaves are 4–15 cm long. Its flowers are rosy with petals measuring up to 7 mm, arranged in auxiliary glomeruli, its fruit is a drupe, 1.8 cm long and red to purple in colour at maturity. The flowers bloom between December and January. Distribution[edit] The genus is found on Madeira island and also on the island of Porto Santo and Ilhas Desertas. It also occurs in the Canary Islands and parts of Cape Verde. The subspecies var. marginata (Sideroxylon marginata) is endemic to the Cape Verde Islands, it is known as the Cape Verde ironwood
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Verbascum Capitis-viridis
Verbascum capitis-viridis is a species of flowers that belong to the Scrophulariaceae family. The species are endemic in Cape Verde.[1] The species was named by Arthur Huber-Morath in 1973. Its local name is salão de feticeira.[1] hence its color and the soil that grows. Distribution and ecology[edit] Verbascum capitis-viridis is mainly founded in the islands of Santo Antão, São Nicolau and Santiago. They are no longer appeared in the islands of Boa Vista and Maio,[1] but they may have reappeared in the two eastern islands probably as ornamental flowers. References[edit]^ a b c Gomes et al 2003, p
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Topographic Prominence
In topography, prominence[a] characterizes the height of a mountain or hill's summit by the vertical distance between it and the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it. It is a measure of the independence of a summit. A peak's key col is a unique point on this contour line and the parent peak is some higher mountain, selected according to various objective criteria.Contents1 Definitions 2 Illustration 3 In mountaineering 4 Parent peak4.1 Encirclement or island parentage 4.2 Prominence parentage 4.3 Line parentage 4.4 Other criteria5 Issues in choice of summit and key col 6 Interesting prominence situations 7 Calculations and mathematics 8 Wet prominence and dry prominence 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDefinitions[edit]Figure 1. Vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island. The dashed horizontal lines show the lowest contours that do not encircle higher peaks
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Sonchus Daltonii
Sonchus daltonii is a species of flowers that belong to the Asteraceae family. The species are endemic in Cape Verde and is listed as endangered by the IUCN.[1] The genus was named by Philip Barker Webb in 1849 while he was describing other plant species in the archipelago. Its local name is heart-of-the-king or king's heart (coroa-de-rei or coroa de rei) (Sabão de Cativi).[2]Contents1 Distribution and ecology 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDistribution and ecology[edit] Sonchus daltonii are founded in the Capeverdean islands of Santo Antão, São Vicente in the area of Monte Verde, São Nicolau,[3] Santiago in the area of Serra da Malagueta and Pico da Antónia and Fogo in the altitude over 700 meters. They are used for fodder for the cattle and has been overgrazed
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Euphorbia Tuckeyana
Euphorbia
Euphorbia
tuckeyana[1] is a species of flowering plant that belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. The species is endemic in Cape Verde. The species is named after James Hingston Tuckey. Its local name is tortolho (tortoise flower). The plants are used for tanning hides.Contents1 Variation 2 Distribution and ecology 3 Other 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksVariation[edit] Euphorbia
Euphorbia
tuckeyana on the crater rim of Chã de Caldeiras on Fogo IslandOld plants higher than 0.5–1 m are extremely rare today. Large plants up to 2 m are only known from outer escarpments of the central caldeira on Fogo as scattered relicts of a scrub vegetation type. Distribution and ecology[edit] Euphorbia
Euphorbia
tuckeyana[clarification needed] are found in much of the Cape Verde
Cape Verde
islands with the exception of the eastern islands of Boa Vista and Maio
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Conyza Feae
Conyza feae is a species of aster flowers that belong to the Asteraceae family. The species are endemic in Cape Verde[2] and is an endangered plant by the IUCN.[1] The plant was first in the Nidorella genus, it was later placed in the Conyza genus by Hiram Wild in 1969 and named after Leonardo Fea who visited Cape Verde in 1898 where he described flora and fauna including this one. Its local name is called losna brabo. The plant plays a role in traditional medicine.Contents1 Distribution and ecology 2 See also 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksDistribution and ecology[edit] Conyza feae are founded in the island of Santo Antão, São Vicente, Santiago, São Nicolau, Fogo and Brava.[2] See also[edit]Conyza pannosa Conyza schlechtendalii Conyza variaFurther reading[edit]Gomes, Isildo; et al. (2003). Endemic plants and indigenous trees of the Cape Verde Islands
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