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Sergei Rachmaninoff
Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff[a][b] (1 April [O.S. 20 March] 1873 – 28 March 1943) was a Russian pianist, composer, and conductor of the late Romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular in the Romantic repertoire. Born into a musical family, Rachmaninoff took up the piano at age four. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory
Moscow Conservatory
in 1892 having already composed several piano and orchestral pieces. In 1897, following the negative critical reaction to his Symphony
Symphony
No. 1, Rachmaninoff entered a four-year depression and composed little until successful therapy allowed him to complete his enthusiastically received Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1901
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John Field (composer)
John Field (26 July 1782 [?], baptised 5 September 1782 – 23 January 1837) was an Irish pianist, composer, and teacher. He was born in Dublin
Dublin
into a musical family, and received his early education there, in particular with the immigrant Tommaso Giordani. The Fields soon moved to London, where Field studied under Muzio Clementi. Under his tutelage, Field quickly became a famous and sought-after concert pianist. Together, master and pupil visited Paris, Vienna, and St. Petersburg. Ambiguity surrounds Field's decision to remain in the former Russian capital, but it is likely that Field acted as a sales representative for the Clementi Pianos
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Novgorod Oblast
Novgorod Oblast (Russian: Новгоро́дская о́бласть, Novgorodskaya oblast) is a federal subject of Russia
Russia
(an oblast). Its administrative center is the city of Veliky Novgorod. Some of the oldest Russian cities, including Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
and Staraya Russa, are located in the oblast
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Russian Aristocracy
The Russian nobility
Russian nobility
(Russian: дворянство dvoryanstvo) arose in the 14th century. Its members (1,900,000 at 1914, 1.1%) staffed most of the Russian government apparatus until the February Revolution of 1917. The Russian word for nobility, dvoryanstvo (дворянство), derives from the Polish word dwor (двор), meaning the court of a prince or duke (kniaz) and later, the court of the tsar or emperor. A nobleman is called a dvoryanin (plural: dvoryane)
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Velvet Book
The Velvet
Velvet
Book (Бархатная книга) was an official register of genealogies of Russia's most illustrious families. The book is bound in red velvet, hence the name.[1] It was compiled during the regency of Sophia (1682–1687) after Tsar Fyodor III of Russia abolished the old system of ranks (mestnichestvo) and all the ancient pedigree books had been burnt to prevent contention between the feuding aristocratic clans. The Velvet
Velvet
Book includes the ancient genealogical register from 1555 (Gosudarev Rodoslovets) featuring the family trees of Rurikid
Rurikid
and Gediminid
Gediminid
princely houses.[1] An important addendum contains a set of genealogies prepared by the non-princely noble families on the basis of their family records
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Tatar
The Tatars
Tatars
(Tatar: татарлар; Russian: татары) are a Turkic people[4] living mainly in Russia
Russia
and other Post-Soviet countries. The name "Tatar" first appears in written form on the Kul Tigin monument as 𐱃𐱃𐰺 (Ta-tar). Historically, the term "Tatars" was applied to a variety of Turco-Mongol
Turco-Mongol
semi-nomadic empires who controlled the vast region known as Tartary. More recently, however, the term refers more narrowly to people who speak one of the Turkic[4] languages. The Mongol
Mongol
Empire, established under Genghis Khan
Genghis Khan
in 1206, allied with the Tatars. Under the leadership of Genghis Khan's grandson Batu Khan (c. 1207–1255), the Mongols
Mongols
moved westwards, driving with them many of the Mongol
Mongol
tribes toward the plains of Kievan Rus'
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Stephen III Of Moldavia
Stephen III of Moldavia, known as Stephen the Great (Romanian: Ștefan cel Mare; pronunciation: [ˈʃtefan t͡ʃel ˈmare]; died on 2 July 1504) was voivode (or prince) of Moldavia from 1457 to 1504. He was the son and co-ruler of Bogdan II of Moldavia who was murdered in 1451. Stephen fled to Hungary, and later to Wallachia, but with the support of Vlad III Dracula, Voivode
Voivode
of Wallachia, he returned to Moldavia, forcing Peter III Aaron to seek refuge in Poland in the summer of 1457. Teoctist I, Metropolitan of Moldavia, anointed him prince. He attacked Poland and prevented Casimir IV Jagiellon, King of Poland, from supporting Peter Aaron, but eventually acknowledged Casimir's suzerainty in 1459. Stephen decided to recapture Chilia (now Kiliya
Kiliya
in Ukraine), an important port on the Danube, which brought him into conflict with Hungary and Wallachia
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Old Style And New Style Dates
Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first change was to change the start of the year from Lady Day
Lady Day
(25 March) to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in favour of the Gregorian calendar.[2][3][4] Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates. Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries
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Dowry
A dowry is a transfer of parental property, gifts or money at the marriage of a daughter.[1] Dowry
Dowry
contrasts with the related concepts of bride price and dower. While bride price or bride service is a payment by the groom or his family to the bride's parents, dowry is the wealth transferred from the bride's family to the groom or his family, ostensibly for the bride. Similarly, dower is the property settled on the bride herself, by the groom at the time of marriage, and which remains under her ownership and control.[2] Dowry
Dowry
is an ancient custom, and its existence may well predate records of it. Dowries continue to be expected, and demanded as a condition to accept a marriage proposal, in some parts of the world, mainly in parts of Asia, Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and the Balkans
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Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
(Russian: Вели́кий Но́вгород, IPA: [vʲɪˈlʲikʲɪj ˈnovɡərət]), also known as Novgorod the Great, or Novgorod Veliky, or just Novgorod, is one of the most important historic cities in Russia,[15] which serves as the administrative center of Novgorod Oblast. It is situated on the M10 federal highway connecting Moscow
Moscow
and St. Petersburg. The city lies along the Volkhov River
Volkhov River
just downstream from its outflow from Lake Ilmen. UNESCO
UNESCO
recognized Novgorod as a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1992
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Kazan
Kazan
Kazan
(Russian: Каза́нь, IPA: [kɐˈzanʲ]; Tatar: Казан) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia. With a population of 1,143,535, it is the sixth most populous city in Russia.[8] Kazan
Kazan
lies at the confluence of the Volga and Kazanka Rivers in European Russia
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Staraya Russa
Staraya Russa
Staraya Russa
(Russian: Старая Русса, IPA: [ˈstarəjə ˈrusə]) is a town in Novgorod Oblast, Russia, located on the Polist River, 99 kilometers (62 mi) south of Veliky Novgorod, the administrative center of the oblast. Its population has steadily decreased over the past years, going from 41,538 recorded in the 1989 Census[10] to 35,511 in the 2002 Census[11] to 31,809 in the 2010 Census.[5]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Administrative and municipal status 4 Economy4.1 Industry 4.2 Transportation5 Attractions 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksEtymology[edit] The origin of the name of Staraya Russa
Staraya Russa
is unclear. The most involved and widespread hypothesis was presented by philologists and linguists R. A. Akheyeva, V. L. Vasilyev, and M.V. Gorbanevsky
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Saint Petersburg Conservatory
The N. A. Rimsky-Korsakov Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
State Conservatory (Russian: Санкт-Петербургская государственная консерватория имени Н. А. Римского-Корсакова) is a music school in Saint Petersburg, Russia. In 2004, the conservatory had around 275 faculty members and 1,400 students.Contents1 History 2 Directors and rectors 3 Notable faculty 4 Notable graduates 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The conservatory was founded in 1862 by Anton Rubinstein, a Russian pianist and composer. On his resignation in 1867, he was succeeded by Nikolai Zaremba. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
was appointed as a professor in 1871, and the conservatory has borne his name since 1944. In 1887, Rubinstein returned to the Conservatory with the goal of improving overall standards
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Russian Orthodox Church
Coordinates: 55°42′40″N 37°37′45″E / 55.71111°N 37.62917°E / 55.71111; 37.62917Russian Orthodox Church ( Moscow
Moscow
Patriarchate)The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
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Liturgy
Liturgy
Liturgy
is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions. As a religious phenomenon, liturgy is a communal response to and participation in, the sacred through activity reflecting praise, thanksgiving, supplication or repentance. Ritualization may be associated with life events such as birth, coming of age, marriage, sex and death. It thus forms the basis for establishing a relationship with a divine agency, as well as with other participants in the liturgy. Methods of dress, preparation of food, application of cosmetics or other hygienic practices are all considered liturgical activities. Technically speaking, liturgy is a subset of ritual. When ritual is undertaken to participate in a divine act or assist a divine action, it is liturgy. If the ritual does not have this purpose it is not liturgy but only ritual
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Pernicious Anemia
Vitamin B12
Vitamin B12
deficiency anemia, of which pernicious anemia is a type,[8] is a disease in which not enough red blood cells are present due to a lack of vitamin B12.[5] The most common initial symptom is feeling tired.[4] Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, pale skin, chest pain, numbness in the hands and feet, poor balance, a smooth red tongue, poor reflexes, depression and confusion.[4] Without treatment some of these problems may become permanent.[5] Although pernicious anemia technically refers to cases resulting from not enough intrinsic factor, it is often used to describe all cases of anemia due to
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