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Sergeant Major Of The Army
The Sergeant Major of the Army
Sergeant Major of the Army
(SMA) is a unique non-commissioned rank and position of office in the United States Army. The holder of this rank and position is the most senior enlisted member of the Army unless an Army Sergeant Major
Army Sergeant Major
is serving as the senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in which case he would be the most senior enlisted man and the SMA will be the second-most senior enlisted member of the Army. The SMA is appointed to serve as a spokesman to address the issues of enlisted soldiers to all officers, from warrant officers and lieutenants to the Army's highest positions. As such, he is the senior enlisted advisor to the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army
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Lieutenant General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Air Force, lieutenant general (abbreviated LTG in the Army, Lt Gen in the Air Force, and LtGen in the Marine Corps) is a three-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-9. Lieutenant general ranks above major general and below general. Lieutenant general
Lieutenant general
is equivalent to the rank of vice admiral in the other uniformed services.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Appointment and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History 5 Modern use 6 Famous lieutenant generals6.1 Historic 6.2 World War II 6.3 1950s through 1980s; Korean War, Vietnam War, Cold War 6.4 Post-Cold War7 See also 8 References 9 External linksStatutory limits[edit]U.S. lieutenant general flagsRank flag of a lieutenant general in the United States Army
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Brigadier General
Brigadier
Brigadier
general (Brig. Gen.) is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6). In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is often considered not to be a general-officer rank, but is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank. The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a brigadier general, or simply a brigadier, would command a brigade in the field
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Enlisted Rank
An enlisted rank (also known as an enlisted grade or enlisted rate) is, in some armed services, any rank below that of a commissioned officer
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Chairman Of The Joint Chiefs Of Staff
The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff
(CJCS) is, by U.S
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1st Infantry Division (United States)
"The Big Red One"[1] (abbreviated "BRO"[2]) "The Bloody First"Motto(s) No Mission Too Difficult. No Sacrifice Too Great. Duty First!March " The Big Red One
The Big Red One
Song"Mascot(s) Rags (WW I)EngagementsWorld War IMontdidier-Noyon Aisne-Marne St. Mihiel Meuse-ArgonneWorld War IIAlgeria-French Morocco Tunisia Sicily Normandy Northern France Rhineland Ardennes-Alsace Central Europe Vietnam
Vietnam
WarTet OffensivePersian Gulf WarOperation Desert StormBattle of 73 Easting Battle of NorfolkGlobal War on Terrorism Iraq
Iraq
War War in Afghanistan Operation Inherent ResolveOperation Atlantic ResolveCommandersCurrent commander Major General
Major General
Joseph M
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed by North VietnamTerritorial changes Re
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United States Army Center Of Military History
The United States
United States
Army Center of Military History (CMH) is a directorate within the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army. The center is responsible for the appropriate use of history and military records throughout the United States
United States
Army. Traditionally, this mission has meant recording the official history of the army in both peace and war, while advising the army staff on historical matters
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Peaked Cap
A peaked cap, forage cap, barracks cover or combination cap is a form of headgear worn by the armed forces of many nations, as well as many uniformed civilian organisations such as law enforcement agencies and fire departments. It derives its name from its short visor (American English, known as a peak in British English), which was historically made of polished leather but increasingly is made of a synthetic substitute. Other principal components are the crown, band and insignia, typically a cap badge and embroidery in proportion to rank. Piping is also often found, typically in contrast to the crown colour, which is usually white for navy, blue for air force and green for army. The band is typically a dark, contrasting colour, often black, but may be patterned or striped. In the British Army, each regiment and corps has a different badge
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Private First Class
Private first class (PFC) is a military rank held by junior enlisted personnel.Contents1 United States1.1 United States Army 1.2 United States Marine Corps2 France 3 Singapore 4 Vietnam 5 Philippines 6 See also 7 ReferencesUnited States[edit] United States Army[edit]U.S. Army private first class insigniaU.S. Army private first class insignia (1956-1968)In the United States Army, recruits usually enter service as a private in pay grade E-1. Private (E-2), designated by a single chevron, is typically an automatic promotion after six months of service. Private first class (E-3), equivalent to NATO
NATO
grade OR-3, is designated by a single chevron and a rocker stripe and is more common among soldiers who have served in the U.S. Army for one year or more
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Specialist (rank)
Specialist (abbreviated "SPC") is a military rank in some countries' armed forces. In the United States military, it is one of the four junior enlisted ranks in the U.S. Army, above private first class and equivalent in pay grade to corporal. Unlike corporals, specialists are not considered junior non-commissioned officers (NCOs). Specialist E-4 is the most common rank that is held by US Army soldiers.[1]Contents1 U.S. Army1.1 Trades and specialties (1902–1920) 1.2 Private/specialist (1920–1942) 1.3 Technician (1942–1948) 1.4 Specialist (1955–present) 1.5 Recruits with college degrees and Officer Candidates2 United States Navy
United States Navy
(1941–1974)2.1 Specialists (1941–1948)2.1.1 Specialties (1942–1948)[11]2.2 Emergency Service ratings (1948–1974)3 References 4 External linksU.S. Army[edit] Trades and specialties (1902–1920)[edit]In 1920, the Army rank and pay system received a major overhaul
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Sergeant First Class
Sergeant
Sergeant
First Class is a military rank in some militaries and other uniformed organizations around the world, typically that of a senior non-commissioned officer.Contents1 United States Army 2 Israel Defense Forces 3 See also 4 ReferencesUnited States Army[edit] Sergeant
Sergeant
First Class (SFC) is the seventh enlisted rank (E-7) in the U.S. Army, ranking above staff sergeant (E-6) and below master sergeant and first sergeant (E-8), and is the first non-commissioned officer rank designated as a senior non-commissioned officer (SNCO). A sergeant first class is typically assigned as a platoon sergeant at the company level or battalion operations non-commissioned officer in charge at the battalion level, but may also hold other positions depending on the type of unit. In a combat arms role, a sergeant first class is typically in charge of from 18 soldiers and four tanks in an armor platoon to 40 soldiers in a rifle platoon
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Petty Officer, Second Class
Petty officer second class is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy,[1] U.S. Coast Guard, and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, just above petty officer third class and below petty officer first class, and is a non-commissioned officer. It is equivalent to the rank of sergeant in the Army and Marine Corps, and staff sergeant in the Air Force.Contents1 Overview 2 Job description 3 Short form naming 4 Promotion system 5 Uniform 6 See also 7 ReferencesOverview[edit] Similar to petty officer third class, advancement to petty officer second class is dependent on time in service, performance evaluations by superiors, and rate (technical specialty) examinations. The advancement cycle is currently every 6 months. Only a certain number of billets (job openings for this rate) open up biannually and all petty officers third class compete
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