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Sentence Clause Structure
In grammar, sentence clause structure is the classification of sentences based on the number and kind of clauses in their syntactic structure. Such division is an element of traditional grammar.Contents1 Types 2 Simple sentences 3 Compound sentences 4 Complex and compound-complex sentences 5 Incomplete sentence 6 Run-on (fused) sentences 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTypes[edit] A simple sentence consists of only one clause. A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses. A complex sentence has at least one independent clause plus at least one dependent clause.[1] A set of words with no independent clause may be an incomplete sentence, also called a sentence fragment. A sentence consisting of at least one dependent clauses and at least two independent clauses may be called a complex-compound sentence or compound-complex sentence. Sentence 1 is an example of a simple sentence
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Grammar
In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology, morphology, and syntax, often complemented by phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules[1] for using that language and these rules constitute that language's grammar. The vast majority of the information in the grammar is — at least in the case of one's native language—acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers
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Grammatical Conjunction
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses that are called the conjuncts of the conjoining construction. The term discourse marker is mostly used for conjunctions joining sentences. This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction. The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that". A simple literary example of a conjunction: "the truth of nature, and the power of giving interest"
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Object (grammar)
Traditional grammar defines the object in a sentence as the entity that is acted upon by the subject.[2] There is thus a primary distinction between subjects and objects that is understood in terms of the action expressed by the verb, e.g. Tom studies grammar—Tom is the subject and grammar is the object. Traditional theories of sentence structure divide the simple sentence into a subject and a predicate,[3] whereby the object is taken to be part of the predicate.[4] Many modern theories of grammar (e.g. dependency grammars), in contrast, take the object to be a verb argument like the subject, the difference between them being mainly just their prominence; the subject is ranked higher than the object and is thus more prominent.[5] The main verb in a clause determines whether and what objects are present
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Stieg Larsson
Karl Stig-Erland "Stieg" Larsson (/stiːɡ ˈlɑːrsən/; Swedish pronunciation: [ˈkɑːɭ ˈstiːɡ ˈæːɭand ˈlɑːʂɔn]; 15 August 1954 – 9 November 2004) was a Swedish journalist and writer. He is best known for writing the Millennium trilogy of crime novels, which were published posthumously and adapted as motion pictures. Larsson lived much of his life in Stockholm
Stockholm
and worked there with socialist politics and journalism, including as an independent researcher of right-wing extremism. He was the second best-selling author in the world for 2008, behind Khaled Hosseini.[1] The third novel in the Millen
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The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
(original title in Swedish: Män som hatar kvinnor; in English: Men Who Hate Women) is a psychological thriller novel by the late Swedish author and journalist Stieg Larsson (1954–2004), which was published posthumously in 2005 to become an international bestseller.[1] It is the first book of the Millennium series.Contents1 Background 2 Plot 3 Characters 4 Major themes4.1 Locked room mystery5 Reception and awards 6 Book of essays 7 Film adaptations 8 Parodies 9 References 10 Publication details 11 See alsoBackground[edit] Larsson spoke of an incident which he said occurred when he was 15: he stood by as three men gang raped an acquaintance of his named Lisbeth. Days later, racked with guilt for having done nothing to help her, he begged her forgiveness—which she refused to grant
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Subject Complement
In grammar, a subject complement (also called a predicative complement) or predicative of the subject is a predicative expression that follows a linking verb (copula) and that complements the subject of the sentence by either (1) renaming it or (2) describing it. In the former case, a renaming noun phrase such as a noun or pronoun is called a predicative nominal. An adjective following the copula and describing the subject is called a predicative adjective. In either case the predicative complement in effect mirrors the subject. Subject complements are used with a small class of verbs called linking verbs or copulas, of which be is the most common
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Prescriptive Grammar
Linguistic prescription, or prescriptive grammar, is the attempt to lay down rules defining correct use of language.[1][2] These rules may address such linguistic aspects as spelling, pronunciation, vocabulary, syntax, and semantics. Sometimes informed by linguistic purism,[3] such normative practices may suggest that some usages are incorrect, improper, illogical, lack communicative effect, or are of low aesthetic value.[4] They may also include judgments on socially proper and politically correct language use. Linguistic prescriptivism may aim to establish a standard language, teach what a particular society perceives as a correct form, or advise on effective communication
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Conjunction (grammar)
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses that are called the conjuncts of the conjoining construction. The term discourse marker is mostly used for conjunctions joining sentences. This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction. The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that". A simple literary example of a conjunction: "the truth of nature, and the power of giving interest"
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
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Ulysses (novel)
Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review
The Little Review
from March 1918 to December 1920 and then published in its entirety in Paris by Sylvia Beach
Sylvia Beach
on 2 February 1922, Joyce's 40th birthday
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Stream Of Consciousness (narrative Mode)
In literary criticism, stream of consciousness is a narrative mode or method that attempts to depict the multitudinous thoughts and feelings which pass through the mind.[1] The term was coined by William James in 1890 in his The Principles of Psychology, and in 1918 the novelist May Sinclair
May Sinclair
(1863–1946) first applied the term stream of consciousness, in a literary context, when discussing Dorothy Richardson's (1873–1957) novels. Pointed Roofs
Pointed Roofs
(1915), the first work in Richardson's series of 13 semi-autobiographical novels titled Pilgrimage,[2] is the first complete stream of consciousness novel published in English. However, in 1934, Richardson comments that "Proust, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
& D.R. ..
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Grammatical Subject
The subject in a simple English sentence such as John runs, John is a teacher, or John was hit by a car is the person or thing about whom the statement is made, in this case 'John'. Traditionally the subject is the word or phrase which controls the verb in the clause, that is to say with which the verb agrees (John is but John and Mary are). If there is no verb, as in John - what an idiot!, or if the verb has a different subject, as in John - I can't stand him!, then 'John' is not considered to be the grammatical subject, but can be described as the 'topic' of the sentence. These definitions seem clear enough for simple sentences such as the above, but as will be shown in the article below, problems in defining the subject arise when an attempt is made to extend the definitions to more complex sentences and to languages other than English
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Restrictive Relative Clause
A relative clause is a kind of subordinate clause that contains an element whose interpretation is provided by an antecedent on which the subordinate clause is grammatically dependent; that is, there is an anaphora relation between the relativized element in the relative clause and the antecedent on which it depends.[1] Typically, a relative clause modifies a noun or noun phrase,[1] and uses some grammatical device to indicate that one of the arguments within the relative clause has the same referent as that noun or noun phrase. For example, in the sentence I met a man who wasn't there, the subordinate clause who wasn't there is a relative clause, since it modifies the noun man, and uses the pronoun who to indicate that the same "man" is referred to within the subordinate clause (in this case, as its subject). In many European languages, relative clauses are introduced by a special class of pronouns called relative pronouns,[2] such as who in the example just given
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Intransitive Verb
In grammar, an intransitive verb does not allow a direct object. This is distinct from a transitive verb, which takes one or more objects. The verb property is called transitivity
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Cambridge University Press
Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world (after Oxford University Press).[2][3] It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.[4] The press's mission is "To further the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."[5] Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press is a department of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
and is both an academic and educational publisher. With a global sales presence, publishing hubs, and offices in more than 40 countries, it publishes over 50,000 titles by authors from over 100 countries
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