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Sense Of Occasion
Sense of Occasion is the 24th studio album by British folk-rock veterans Fairport Convention, released in February 2007.Contents1 Overview 2 Track listing 3 Personnel 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] The title comes from the fact that 2007 marks the 40th anniversary of the band (although only one member, Simon Nicol, remains from the original line-up). Track listing[edit]"Keep on Turning the Wheel" (Chris Leslie) – 4:18 "Love on a Farmboy's Wages" (Andy Partridge) – 4:14 "The Bowman's Return" (Ric Sanders) – 4:14 "South Dakota to Manchester" (Leslie) – 4:12 "Spring Song" (Leslie) – 4:37 "Polly on the Shore" (Music: Dave Pegg; Lyrics: Dave Swarbrick, Trevor Lucas) – 5:03 "Just Dandy" (Sanders) – 2:56 "Tam Lin" (Traditional; arranged by Swarbrick) –
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Violin
The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments are known, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow (col legno). Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments and in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz
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Allmusic
AllMusic (previously known as All Music Guide or AMG) is an online music guide. The largest music database on the web, it catalogs more than 3 million album entries and 30 million tracks. It was launched in 1991, predating the World Wide Web.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 The All Music Guide series 3 Reception 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] AllMusic was launched as All Music Guide by Michael Erlewine, a "compulsive archivist, noted astrologer, Buddhist scholar and musician." He became interested in using computers for his astrological work in the mid-'70s, and founded a software company, Matrix, in 1977. In the early '90s, as CDs replaced vinyl as the prevalent format for recorded music, Erlewine purchased what he thought was a CD of early recordings by Little Richard
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Bouzouki
Plucked string instrumentNecked bowl lutes String instruments Hornbostel–Sachs classification 321.321 (string instrument with a pear-shaped body and a long neck, played with plectrum)Playing rangeC3 - E6 (tetrachordo)Related instrumentsPanduraByzantine Lyra Tambouras Buzuq Baglamas
Baglamas
(Saz)The bouzouki (also buzuki; Greek: μπουζούκι pronounced [buˈzuci]; plural bouzoukia Greek: μπουζούκια) is a Greek musical instrument that was brought to Greece
Greece
in the 1900s by Greek immigrants from Asia Minor, and quickly became the central instrument to the rebetiko genre and its music branches.[1] A mainstay of modern Greek music, the bouzouki has a flat front usually heavily inlaid with mother-of-pearl. The instrument is played with a plectrum and has a sharp metallic sound, reminiscent of a mandolin but pitched lower
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Mandolin
String instrument Plucked string instrument Hornbostel–Sachs classification 321.321-6 (Neapolitan) or 321.322-6 (flat-backed) ( Chordophone
Chordophone
with permanently attached resonator and neck, sounded by a plectrum)Developed Mid 18th century from the mandolinoTimbrevaries with the type:spruce carved-top, bright flatback, warm or mellowDecay fastPlaying range(a regularly tuned mandolin with 14 frets to body)Related instrumentsListFamilyMandolin Mandola Octave mandolin Mandocello MandobassBandurria Angélique (instrument) Archlute Balalaika Bouzouki Chitarra Italiana Domra Irish bouzouki Lute Mandriola Mandole Oud Pandura TamburaA mandolin (Italian: mandolino pronounced [mandoˈliːno]; literally "small mandola") is a stringed musical instrument in the lute family and is usually plucked with a plectrum or "pick"
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Bass Guitar
The bass guitar[1] (also known as electric bass,[2][3][4] or bass) is a stringed instrument similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four to six strings or courses. The four-string bass is usually tuned the same as the double bass,[5] which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lowest pitched strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds. It is played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, strumming, tapping, thumping, or picking with a plectrum, often known as a pick
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Pump Organ
The pump organ, reed organ, harmonium, or melodeon is a type of free-reed organ that generates sound as air flows past a vibrating piece of thin metal in a frame. The piece of metal is called a reed. More portable than pipe organs, free-reed organs were widely used in smaller churches and in private homes in the 19th century, but their volume and tonal range are limited, and they generally had one or sometimes two manuals, with pedal-boards being rare. The finer instruments have a unique[peacock term] tone, and the cabinets of those intended for churches and affluent homes were often excellent pieces of furniture
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Percussion
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1] The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. Percussive techniques can also be applied to the human body, as in body percussion
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Drums
A drum kit — also called a drum set, trap set, or simply drums — is a collection of drums and other percussion instruments, typically cymbals, which are set up on stands to be played by a single player,[1] with drumsticks held in both hands, and the feet operating pedals that control the hi-hat cymbal and the beater for the bass drum. A drum kit consists of a mix of drums (categorized classically as membranophones, Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 2) and idiophones - most significantly cymbals, but can also include the woodblock and cowbell (classified as Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 1).[2] In the 2000s, some kits also include electronic instruments ( Hornbostel-Sachs classification 53)
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Dan Ar Braz
Dan Ar Braz
Dan Ar Braz
(born Daniel Le Bras on 15 January 1949 in Quimper) is a Breton guitarist-singer-composer and the founder of Héritage des Celtes, a 50-piece Pan-Celt band. Leading guitarist in Celtic music, Dan Ar Braz
Dan Ar Braz
has recorded as a soloist and with innovative Celtic harp player Alan Stivell
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Twelve-string Guitar
The twelve-string guitar is a steel-string guitar with twelve strings in six courses, which produces a richer, more ringing tone than a standard six-string guitar. Typically, the strings of the lower four courses are tuned in octaves, with those of the upper two courses tuned in unisons. The strings are generally arranged such that the first string of each pair to be struck on a downward strum is the higher octave string; however, Rickenbacker
Rickenbacker
usually reverses this arrangement on its electric 12 string guitars. The gap between the strings within each dual-string course is narrow, and the strings of each course are fretted and plucked as a single unit. The neck is wider, to accommodate the extra strings, and is similar to the width of a classical guitar neck
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Electric Guitar
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is sent to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker, which converts it into audible sound. Since the output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, it can be electronically altered by to change the timbre of the sound
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Acoustic Guitar
An acoustic guitar is a guitar that produces sound acoustically by transmitting the vibration of the strings to the air—as opposed to relying on electronic amplification (see electric guitar). The sound waves from the strings of an acoustic guitar resonate through the guitar's body, creating sound. This typically involves the use of a sound board and a sound box to strengthen the vibrations of the strings. The main source of sound in an acoustic guitar is the string, which is plucked or strummed with the finger or with a pick. The string vibrates at a necessary frequency and also creates many harmonics at various different frequencies. The frequencies produced can depend on string length, mass, and tension
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Vocals
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
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Tam Lin
Tam (or Tamas) Lin (also called Tamlane, Tamlin, Tambling, Tomlin, Tam Lien, Tam-a-Line, Tam Lyn, or Tam Lane) is a character in a legendary ballad originating from Norfolk (Child 39, Roud 35). It is also associated with a reel of the same name, also known as the Glasgow Reel. The story revolves around the rescue of Tam Lin
Tam Lin
by his true love from the Queen of the Fairies
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