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Sensō-ji
Sensō-ji
Sensō-ji
(金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji) is an ancient Buddhist
Buddhist
temple located in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant
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Karahafu
The karahafu (kara-hafu) (唐破風) is a type of gable with a style peculiar to Japan. The characteristic shape is the undulating curve at the top. This gable is common in traditional architecture, including Japanese castles, Buddhist temples, and Shinto shrines. Roofing materials such as tile and bark may be used as coverings. The face beneath the gable may be flush with the wall below, or it may terminate on a lower roof.Contents1 History 2 Images 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Although kara (唐) can be translated as meaning "China" or "Tang", this type of roof with undulating bargeboards is an invention of Japanese carpenters in the late Heian period.[1] It was named thus because the word kara could also mean "noble" or "elegant", and was often added to names of objects considered grand or intricate regardless of origin.[2] The karahafu developed during the Heian period and is shown in picture scrolls to decorate gates, corridors, and palanquins
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Kimono
The kimono (着物, きもの)[1] is a traditional Japanese garment. The word "kimono", which actually means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"),[2] has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos,[3] but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also used. The kimono is always worn for important festivals or formal occasions. It is a formal style of clothing associated with politeness and good manners. Kimono
Kimono
have T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wide sleeves. Kimono
Kimono
are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial)[4] and are secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back
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Japanese Festivals
Japanese festivals
Japanese festivals
are traditional festive occasions. Some festivals have their roots in Chinese festivals centuries ago, but have undergone great changes as they mixed with local customs. Some are so different that they do not even remotely resemble the original festival despite sharing the same name and date. There are also various local festivals (e.g. Tobata Gion) that are mostly unknown outside a given prefecture. It is commonly said that you will always find a festival somewhere in Japan. Unlike most people in East Asia, Japanese people
Japanese people
generally do not celebrate Lunar New Year (it having been supplanted by the Western New Year's Day, on January 1, in the late 19th century); although many Chinese residents in Japan, as well as some shrines and temples for religious purposes, still celebrate Lunar New Year in parallel with the Western New Year
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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East Asian Hip-and-gable Roof
Asian may refer to:Items from or related to the continent of Asia: Asian people, people who descend from Asia Asian culture, the culture of the people from Asia Asian cuisine, food based on the style of food of the people from Asia Asian (cat), a cat breed similar to the Burmese but in a range of different coat colors an
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Hisashi (architecture)
In Japanese architecture
Japanese architecture
the term hisashi (廂・庇) has two meanings:As more commonly used, the term indicates the eaves of a roof,[1] that is, the part along the edge of a roof projecting beyond the side of the building to provide protection against the weather. The term is however also used in a more specialized sense to indicate the area surrounding the moya (the core of a building) either completely or on one, two, or three sides.[1]It is common in Zen
Zen
Buddhist temples where it is a 1 ken wide aisle-like area and at the same level as the moya
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Pagoda
A pagoda is a tiered tower with multiple eaves, built in traditions originating as stupa in historic South Asia[1][2] and further developed in East Asia
East Asia
or with respect to those traditions, common to Nepal, China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Myanmar, India, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and other parts of Asia. Some pagodas are used as Taoist
Taoist
houses of worship. Most pagodas were built to have a religious function, most commonly Buddhist, and were often located in or near viharas. In some countries, the term may refer to other religious structures
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Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e[a] is a genre of Japanese art
Japanese art
which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. The term ukiyo-e (浮世絵) translates as "picture[s] of the floating world". Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) became the seat of government for the military dictatorship in the early 17th century. The merchant class at the bottom of the social order benefited most from the city's rapid economic growth. Many indulged in the entertainments of kabuki theatre, courtesans, and geisha of the pleasure districts
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Woodblock Printing
Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
is a technique for printing text, images or patterns used widely throughout East Asia
East Asia
and originating in China
China
in antiquity as a method of printing on textiles and later paper. As a method of printing on cloth, the earliest surviving examples from China
China
date to before 220 AD. Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
existed in Tang China during the 7th century AD and remained the most common East Asian method of printing books and other texts, as well as images, until the 19th century. Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
is the best known type of Japanese woodblock art print
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Godzilla
Godzilla
Godzilla
(Japanese: ゴジラ, Hepburn: Gojira) (/ɡɒdˈzɪlə/; [ɡoꜜdʑiɾa] ( listen)) is a monster originating from a series of tokusatsu films of the same name from Japan. The character first appeared in Ishirō Honda's 1954 film Godzilla
Godzilla
and become a worldwide pop culture icon, appearing in media including 29 films produced by Toho, three Hollywood films, and numerous video games, novels, comic books, television shows. It is often dubbed the "King of the Monsters", a phrase first used in Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, the Americanized version of the original film. Godzilla
Godzilla
is depicted as an enormous, destructive, prehistoric sea monster awakened and empowered by nuclear radiation
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Japanese Buddhist Architecture
Japanese Buddhist architecture
Japanese Buddhist architecture
is the architecture of Buddhist temples in Japan, consisting of locally developed variants of architectural styles born in China.[1] After Buddhism
Buddhism
arrived the continent via Three Kingdoms of Korea
Three Kingdoms of Korea
in the 6th century, an effort was initially made to reproduce original buildings as faithfully as possible, but gradually local versions of continental styles were developed both to meet Japanese tastes and to solve problems posed by local weather, which is more rainy and humid than in China.[2] The first Buddhist sects were Nara's six Nanto Rokushū (南都六宗, Nara six sects),[nb 1] followed during the Heian period
Heian period
by Kyoto's Shingon
Shingon
and Tendai
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O-mikuji
O-mikuji
O-mikuji
(御御籤, 御神籤, or おみくじ, o-mikuji[1]) are random fortunes written on strips of paper at Shinto
Shinto
shrines and Buddhist
Buddhist
temples in Japan. Literally "sacred lot", these are usually received by making a small offering (generally a five-yen coin as it is considered good luck) and randomly choosing one from a box, hoping for the resulting fortune to be good. As of 2011[update] coin-slot machines sometimes dispense o-mikuji.[citation needed] The o-mikuji is scrolled up or folded, and unrolling the piece of paper reveals the fortune written on it
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Querent
A querent (derived, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, from the Latin quærēns "seeking", the present participle of quærere "to seek, gain, ask") is "one who seeks". Querent became used to denote "a person who questions an oracle" because it is usually when one has a problem that requires otherworldly advice that one would seek out the oracle in the first place. This oracle may simply be a divinatory technique, such as the I Ching, that is manipulated by the querents themselves without recourse to any other human agency. Alternatively it may involve another person, someone perhaps seen as a "fortune teller" – particularly a practitioner of tarot reading or other form of mediumship – from whom advice is sought. The kinds of questions asked by querents may vary widely according to their needs, and the methodology of the divination system. Some querents seek general advice trusting that they will be told what is most pertinent to their present situation
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Japanese Garden
Japanese gardens (日本庭園, nihon teien) are traditional gardens[1] whose designs are accompanied by Japanese aesthetic and philosophical ideas, avoid artificial ornamentation, and highlight the natural landscape
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Glossary Of Japanese Buddhism
This is the glossary of Japanese Buddhism, including major terms the casual (or brand-new) reader might find useful in understanding articles on the subject. Words followed by an asterisk (*) are illustrated by an image in one of the photo galleries
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