HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Semicarbazide
Semicarbazide
Semicarbazide
is the chemical compound with the formula OC(NH2)(N2H3). It is a water-soluble white solid. It is a derivative of urea.Contents1 Synthesis 2 Derivatives 3 Properties 4 Uses, occurrence, detection 5 Structures 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksSynthesis[edit] The compound prepared by treating urea with hydrazine:[1]OC(NH2)2 + N2H4 → OC(NH2)(N2H3) + NH3A further reaction can occur to give carbohydrazide:OC(NH2)(N2H3) + N2H4 → OC(N2H3)2 + NH3Derivatives[edit] Semicarbazide
Semicarbazide
is frequently reacted with aldehydes and ketones to produce semicarbazones via a condensation reaction. This is an example of imine formation resulting from the reaction of a primary amine with a carbonyl group
[...More...]

"Semicarbazide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
[...More...]

"CAS Registry Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pharmaceuticals
A medication (also referred to as medicine, pharmaceutical drug, or simply as drug) is a drug used to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent disease.[1][2][3] Drug
Drug
therapy (pharmacotherapy) is an important part of the medical field and relies on the science of pharmacology for continual advancement and on pharmacy for appropriate management. Drugs are classified in various ways. One of the key divisions is by level of control, which distinguishes prescription drugs (those that a pharmacist dispenses only on the order of a physician, physician assistant, or qualified nurse) from over-the-counter drugs (those that consumers can order for themselves)
[...More...]

"Pharmaceuticals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oxime
An oxime is a chemical compound belonging to the imines, with the general formula R1R2C=NOH, where R1 is an organic side-chain and R2 may be hydrogen, forming an aldoxime, or another organic group, forming a ketoxime. O-substituted oximes form a closely related family of compounds. Amidoximes are oximes of amides with general structure RC(=NOH)(NRR'). Oximes are usually generated by the reaction of hydroxylamine and aldehydes or ketones. The term oxime dates back to the 19th century, a combination of the words oxygen and imine.[1]Contents1 Structure and properties 2 Preparation 3 Reactions 4 Uses4.1 Metal extractant 4.2 Other applications5 See also 6 ReferencesStructure and properties[edit] If the two side-chains on the central carbon are different from each other, the oxime can have two geometric stereoisomeric form: a syn isomer and an anti isomer, depending on which of the two side-chains is closer to the hydroxyl
[...More...]

"Oxime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

JSmol
Jmol
Jmol
is computer software for molecular modelling chemical structures in 3-dimensions.[2] Jmol
Jmol
returns a 3D representation of a molecule that may be used as a teaching tool,[3] or for research e.g., in chemistry and biochemistry. It is written in the programming language Java, so it can run on the operating systems Windows, macOS, Linux, and Unix, if Java is installed. It is free and open-source software released under a GNU Lesser General Public License
GNU Lesser General Public License
(LGPL) version 2.0. A standalone application and a software development kit (SDK) exist that can be integrated into other Java applications, such as Bioclipse and Taverna. A popular feature is an applet that can be integrated into web pages to display molecules in a variety of ways
[...More...]

"JSmol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Antiviral Drug
Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections rather than bacterial ones.[1] Most antivirals are used for specific viral infections, while a broad-spectrum antiviral is effective against a wide range of viruses.[2] Unlike most antibiotics, antiviral drugs do not destroy their target pathogen; instead they inhibit their development. Antiviral drugs are one class of antimicrobials, a larger group which also includes antibiotic (also termed antibacterial), antifungal and antiparasitic drugs,[3] or antiviral drugs based on monoclonal antibodies.[4] Most antivirals are considered relatively harmless to the host, and therefore can be used to treat infections. They should be distinguished from viricides, which are not medication but deactivate or destroy virus particles, either inside or outside the body
[...More...]

"Antiviral Drug" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antiinfective
Infection
Infection
is the invasion of an organism's body tissues by disease-causing agents, their multiplication, and the reaction of host tissues to the infectious agents and the toxins they produce.[1][2] Infectious disease, also known as transmissible disease or communicable disease, is illness resulting from an infection. Infections are caused by infectious agents including viruses, viroids, prions, bacteria, nematodes such as parasitic roundworms and pinworms, arthropods such as ticks, mites, fleas, and lice, fungi such as ringworm, and other macroparasites such as tapeworms and other helminths. Hosts can fight infections using their immune system
[...More...]

"Antiinfective" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antineoplastic
Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
(often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a category of cancer treatment that uses one or more anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapeutic agents) as part of a standardized chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
may be given with a curative intent (which almost always involves combinations of drugs), or it may aim to prolong life or to reduce symptoms (palliative chemotherapy). Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
is one of the major categories of the medical discipline specifically devoted to pharmacotherapy for cancer, which is called medical oncology. The term chemotherapy has come to connote non-specific usage of intracellular poisons to inhibit mitosis, or cell division. The connotation excludes more selective agents that block extracellular signals (signal transduction)
[...More...]

"Antineoplastic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
[...More...]

"Copper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iron
Iron
Iron
is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth
Earth
is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust
[...More...]

"Iron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nitrofuran
Nitrofurans are a class of drugs typically used as antibiotics or antimicrobials. The defining structural component is a furan ring with a nitro group. Members of this class of drugs include:Antibacterials (antibiotics)Difurazone (also known as Nitrovin) — an antibacterial growth promoter used in the animal feeds Furazolidone Nifurfoline Nifuroxazide Nifurquinazol Nifurtoinol Nifurzide Nitrofural
Nitrofural
(also known as nitrofurazone) Nitrofurantoin Ranbezolid
Ranbezolid
— technically an oxazolidinone antibiotic bearing a nitrofuran groupAntimicrobialsFuraltadone — an antiprotozoal Furazidine — an antibacterial and antiprotozoal Furylfuramide
Furylfuramide
— a formerly used food preservative Nifuratel
Nifuratel
— an antiprotozoal and antifungal Nifurtimox
Nifurtimox
— an antiprotozoalFANFT, a potent nitrofuran derivative tumor initiator
[...More...]

"Nitrofuran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imine
An imine (/ɪˈmiːn/ or /ˈɪmɪn/) is a functional group or chemical compound containing a carbon–nitrogen double bond. The nitrogen atom can be attached to a hydrogen (H) or an organic group (R). If this group is not a hydrogen atom, then the compound can sometimes be referred to as a Schiff base.[1] The carbon atom has two additional single bonds.[2][3][4] The term "imine" was coined in 1883 by the German chemist Albert Ladenburg.[5]Contents1 Nomenclature and classification 2 Synthesis of imines2.1 More specialized methods3 Imine
Imine
reactions3.1 Acid-base reactions 3.2 As ligands 3.3 Imine
Imine
reductions4 Biological role 5 See also 6 ReferencesNomenclature and classification[edit] Usually imines refer to compounds with the connectivity R2C=NR, as discussed below. In the older literature, imine refers to the aza analogue of an epoxide
[...More...]

"Imine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antibacterial
Antibiotics
Antibiotics
(from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called antibacterials, are a type of antimicrobial[1] drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.[2][3] They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria
[...More...]

"Antibacterial" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Furazolidone
Furazolidone is a nitrofuran antibacterial agent and monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI).[1] It is marketed by Roberts Laboratories under the brand name Furoxone and by GlaxoSmithKline as Dependal-M.Contents1 Medical uses1.1 Use in humans 1.2 Use in animals 1.3 Use in laboratory2 Mechanism of action 3 Side effects 4 See also 5 ReferencesMedical uses[edit] Furazolidone has been used in human and veterinary medicine. It has a broad spectrum of activity being active againstGram positiveClostridium perfringens Corynebacterium pyogenes Streptococci StaphylococciGram negativeEscherichia coli Salmonella dublin Salmonella typhimurium ShigellaProtozoaGiardia lamblia Eimeria species Histomonas meleagridisUse in humans[edit] In humans it has been used to treat diarrhoea and enteritis caused by bacteria or protozoan infections, including traveler's diarrhoea, cholera and bacteremic salmonellosis
[...More...]

"Furazolidone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nitrofurazone
Nitrofurazone
Nitrofurazone
(INN, trade name Furacin) is an antimicrobial organic compound belonging to the furan class.[1] It is most commonly used as a topical antibiotic ointment.[2] It is effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and can be used in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.[3][1][4] Its use in medicine has become less frequent, as safer and more effective products have become available.[5] Nitrofurazone
Nitrofurazone
is listed under California Prop 65, and has demonstrated clear evidence to be mutagenic and carcinogenic during animal studies, and has been discontinued for human use in the USA.[6][2][5][7] The substance is pale yellow and crystalline
[...More...]

"Nitrofurazone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nitrofurantoin
Nitrofurantoin, sold under the trade name Macrobid among others, is an antibiotic used to treat bladder infections.[1] It is not effective for kidney infections.[1] It is taken by mouth.[1] Common side effects include nausea, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and headaches.[1] Rarely numbness, lung problems, or liver problems may occur.[1] It should not be used in people with kidney problems.[1] While it appears to be generally safe during pregnancy it should not be used near delivery.[1][2] It works by slowing growth rather than killing bacteria.[1] Nitrofurantoin
Nitrofurantoin
was first sold in 195
[...More...]

"Nitrofurantoin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.