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Semi Democracy
Democracy
Democracy
(Greek: δημοκρατία dēmokratía, literally "rule of the people"), in modern usage, is a system of government in which the citizens exercise power directly or elect representatives from among themselves to form a governing body, such as a parliament.[1] Democracy
Democracy
is someti
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Liberal Democracy
Liberal democracy
Liberal democracy
is a liberal political ideology and a form of government in which representative democracy operates under the principles of classical liberalism. Also called western democracy, it is characterised by fair, free and competitive elections between multiple distinct political parties, a separation of powers into different branches of government, the rule of law in everyday life as part of an open society and the equal protection of human rights, civil rights, civil liberties and political freedoms for all people. To define the system in practice, liberal democracies often draw upon a constitution, either formally written or uncodified, to delineate the powers of government and enshrine the social contract
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Islamic Democracy
PoliticalHizb ut-Tahrir Iranian Revolution Jamaat-e-Islami Millî Görüş Muslim Brotherhood List of Islamic political partiesMilitantMilitant Islamism
Islamism
based inMENA region South Asia Southeast Asia Sub-Saharan AfricaKey textsReconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam (Iqbal 1930s)Principles of State and Government (Asad 1961) Ma'alim fi al-Tariq
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New Democracy
New Democracy
Democracy
or the New Democratic Revolution is a concept based on Mao Zedong's "Bloc of Four Social Classes" theory in post-revolutionary China which argued originally that democracy in China would take a decisively distinct path, much different from that of the liberal capitalist and parliamentary democratic systems in the western world as well as Soviet-style socialism in Eastern Europe. As time passed, the New Democracy
Democracy
concept was adapted to other countries and regions with similar justifications.Contents1 Concept 2 Comparisons with core Marxism 3 Effects of establishment 4 Examples 5 Criticism 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksConcept[edit] The concept of New Democracy
Democracy
aims to overthrow feudalism and achieve independence from colonialism
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Non-partisan Democracy
Nonpartisan democracy (also no-party democracy) is a system of representative government or organization such that universal and periodic elections take place without reference to political parties.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Structures3.1 Elections 3.2 Appointments 3.3 Legislatures4 Examples4.1 National governments 4.2 Territorial governments 4.3 State or provincial governments 4.4 Municipal
Municipal
governments5 Religious perspectives 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] Sometimes electioneering and even speaking about candidates may be discouraged, so as not to prejudice others' decisions or create a contentious atmosphere. Nonpartisan democracies may possess indirect elections whereby an electorate are chosen who in turn vote for the representative(s)
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Participatory Democracy
Participatory democracy
Participatory democracy
emphasizes the broad participation of constituents in the direction and operation of political systems. Etymological roots of democracy (Greek demos and kratos) imply that the people are in power and thus that all democracies are participatory. However, participatory democracy tends to advocate more involved forms of citizen participation and greater political representation than traditional representative democracy. Participatory democracy
Participatory democracy
strives to create opportunities for all members of a population to make meaningful contributions to decision-making, and seeks to broaden the range of people who have access to such opportunities
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People's Democracy (Marxism–Leninism)
People's democracy was a theoretical concept within Marxism–Leninism (and a form of government in communist states) which developed after World War II, which allowed in theory for a multi-class, multi-party democracy on the pathway to socialism. Prior to the rise of Fascism, communist parties had called for Soviet Republics to be implemented throughout the world, such as the Chinese Soviet Republic
Chinese Soviet Republic
or William Z. Foster's book Towards Soviet America
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Popular Democracy
Popular democracy is a notion of direct democracy based on referendums and other devices of empowerment and concretization of popular will. The concept evolved out of the political philosophy of Populism, as a fully democratic version of this popular empowerment ideology, but since it has become independent of it, and some even discuss if they are antagonistic or unrelated now (see Values)
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Procedural Democracy
Procedural democracy is a democracy in which the people or citizens of the state have less influence than in traditional liberal democracies. This type of democracy is characterized by voters choosing to elect representatives in free elections. Procedural democracy assumes that the electoral process is at the core of the authority placed in elected officials and ensures that all procedures of elections are duly complied with (or at least appear so). It could be described as a republic (i.e., people voting for representatives) wherein only the basic structures and institutions are in place
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Radical Democracy
Radical democracy was articulated by Ernesto Laclau
Ernesto Laclau
and Chantal Mouffe in their book Hegemony and Socialist Strategy: Towards a Radical Democratic Politics, written in 1985. They argue that social movements which attempt to create social and political change need a strategy which challenges neoliberal and neoconservative concepts of democracy.[1] This strategy is to expand the liberal definition of democracy, based on freedom and equality, to include difference.[1] "Radical democracy" means "the root of democracy". Laclau and Mouffe claim that liberal democracy and deliberative democracy, in their attempts to build consensus, oppress differing opinions, races, classes, genders, and worldviews.[1] In the world, in a country, and in a social movement there are many (a plurality of) differences which resist consensus
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Representative Democracy
Representative democracy
Representative democracy
(also indirect democracy, representative republic or psephocracy) is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials representing a group of people, as opposed to direct democracy.[2] Nearly all modern Western-style democracies are types of representative democracies; for example, the United Kingdom is a constitutional monarchy, Ireland is a unitary parliamentary republic, and the United States is a federal republic.[3] It is an element of both the parliamentary and the presidential systems of government and is typically used in a lower chamber such as the House of Commons
House of Commons
(United Kingdom), Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
(India) or Dáil Éireann (Republic of Ireland), and may be curtailed by constitutional constraints such as an upper chamber. It has been described by some political theorists including Robert A
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Religious Democracy
Religious
Religious
democracy[1] is a form of government where the values of a particular religion affect laws and rules. The term applies to all countries in which religion is incorporated into the form of government. Democracies are characterized as secular or religious.[2] The definition of democracy is disputed and interpreted differently amongst politicians and scholars. It could be argued if only liberal democracy is true democracy, if religion can be incorporated into democracy, or if religion is a necessity for democracy. The religiosity of political leaders can also have an effect on the practice of democracy.Contents1 Criticism 2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesCriticism[edit] Major criticism of religious democracy include criticism from the secular and the legalist points of view.[3][4]From the secular point of view, religion is a hindrance to democracy as it enforces a set of legal and societal principles
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Christian Democracy
Christian democracy is a political ideology that emerged in nineteenth-century Europe
Europe
under the influence of Catholic social teaching,[1][2] as well as Neo-Calvinism.[nb 1] Christian democratic political ideology advocates for a commitment to social market principles and qualified interventionism
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Jewish And Democratic State
"Jewish and democratic state" is the Israeli legal definition of the nature and character of the State of Israel. The "Jewish" nature was first defined within the Declaration of Independence of 1948 (see Jewish state and Jewish homeland)
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Media Democracy
Media and democracy is a liberal-democratic approach to media studies that advocates for reforming the mass media, strengthening public service broadcasting, developing and participating in alternative media and citizen journalism, in order to create a mass media system that informs and empowers all members of society, and enhances democratic values. Media is also defined as "medium" a way of communicating with others[1].Contents1 Definition 2 Media ownership concentration 3 Internet media democracy 4 Feminism 5 Criticism 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingDefinition[edit] Media democracy focuses on using information technologies to both empower individual citizens and promote democratic ideals through the spread of information.[2] Additionally, the media system itself should be democratic in its own construction [3] shying away from private ownership or intense regulation
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Theodemocracy
Theodemocracy
Theodemocracy
was a theocratic political system that included elements of democracy. It was theorized by Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. According to Smith, theodemocracy was meant to be a fusion of traditional republican democratic rights under the United States Constitution with theocratic principles. Smith described it as a system under which God and the people held the power to rule in righteousness.[1] Smith believed that this would be the form of government that would rule the world upon the Second Coming of Christ
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