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Section 4 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 4 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
formally established the vice-regal position of the Governor-General of Australia.External links[edit]Commonwealth Of Australia Constitution Act - Sect 4 at Austliiv t eConstitution of AustraliaChaptersI: The Parliament II: The Executive III: Courts IV: Finance and Trade V: The States VI: New States VII: Miscellaneous VIII: AmendmentsSections1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
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Vice-regal
A viceroy /ˈvaɪs.rɔɪ/ is a regal official who runs a country, colony, city, province, or sub-national state, in the name of and as the representative of the monarch of the territory. The term derives from the Latin prefix vice-, meaning "in the place of" and the French word roi, meaning "king". A viceroy's territory may be called a viceroyalty, though this term is not always applied
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AustLII
The Australasian Legal Information Institute
Legal Information Institute
(AustLII) is an institution operated jointly by the Faculties of Law of the University of Technology Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Its public policy purpose is to improve access to justice through access to legal information.[1]Contents1 Inception 2 Content 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksInception[edit] AustLII was established in 1995.[2][3] Founded as joint program of the University of Technology Sydney
University of Technology Sydney
and the University of New South Wales Law schools, its initial funding was provided by the Australian Research Council.[4] Content[edit] AustLII content is publicly available legal information. Its primary source information includes legislation, treaties and decisions of courts and tribunals
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Section 15 Of The Constitution Of Australia
In the Parliament of Australia, a casual vacancy arises when a member of either the Senate or the House of Representatives:dies resigns mid-term[1] is expelled from Parliament and their seat is declared vacant,[2] is absent from (fails to attend) the house, without the permission of the house, for two consecutive months of a session,[3] or is disqualified.[4]Contents1 Disqualification 2 Resignation 3 How a casual vacancy is filled3.1 Senate3.1.1 States 3.1.2 Territories3.2 House of Representatives4 See also 5 ReferencesDisqualification[edit] See also: Section 44 of the Constitution of Australia The Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 requires candidates for Parliament to be Australian citizens.[5] A member will be disqualified if they are found to have been ineligible for election, or become ineligible to sit, because they:are a subject or citizen of a foreign power or under an acknowledgment of allegiance, obedience or adheren
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Section 6 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 6 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
makes mandatory at least one sitting of the Parliament of Australia
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Section 41 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 41 of the Australian Constitution is a provision of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
which states that "no adult person who has or acquires a right to vote at elections for the more numerous House of the Parliament of a State shall, while the right continues, be prevented by any law of the Commonwealth from voting at elections for either House of the Parliament of the Commonwealth." Related High Court decisions[edit]King v Jones: The words "adult person" are fixed with the same meaning they had when the Constitution came into effect, that is, they refer to persons over the age of 21, no matter the contemporary interpretation. R v Pearson; Ex parte Sipka: The section is only provisional; rights acquired after the passage of the Commonwealth Franchise Act 1902
Commonwealth Franchise Act 1902
are not protected
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Section 40 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 40 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
provides that questions in the House of Representatives shall be determined by majority vote, excluding that of the Speaker. If there is a tie, then the Speaker has a casting vote. The Speaker does not have to use this vote, and if they choose not to do so, then the question is answered in the negative.[1] Unlike in the Senate, tied votes in the House of Representatives are rare
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Section 39 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 39 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
provides that the quorum of the Australian House of Representatives
Australian House of Representatives
shall be one third of the total number of members, until the Parliament otherwise provides. During the Convention debates in Adelaide, Joseph Carruthers
Joseph Carruthers
suggested that one third was too high and suggested that a quorum of twenty would be sufficient, but his suggestion was rejected.[1] With the passage of the House of Representatives (Quorum) Act 1989, the Parliament has changed the quorum to one fifth of the total number of members, which with the current House of Representatives size of 150 means that at least 30 members are required for a quorum.[2] See also[edit]Section 22 of the Constitution of AustraliaReferences[edit]^ Quick, John; Garran, Robert (1901). The Annotated Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth
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Section 25 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 25 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
is a provision of the Constitution of Australia
Constitut

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Section 22 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 22 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
provides that the quorum of the Australian Senate
Australian Senate

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Governor-General Of Australia
At Her Majesty's pleasure (under convention, usually 5 years) [1]Formation 1 January 1901First holder The Earl
Earl
of HopetounSalary $425,000Website gg.gov.auAustraliaThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of AustraliaConstitutionConstitution of AustraliaStatute of Westminster Adoption Act Australia
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Section 13 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 13 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
provides for three aspects of the terms of members of the Australian Senate, the timing of elections, the commencement date of their terms and for the Senate to allocate 6 and 3-year terms following a double dissolution of the Parliament of Australia.[1] While member of the House of Representatives have a maximum three-year term, members of the Senate have a fixed 6-year term, subject only to the parliament being dissolved by a double dissolution.Contents1 Timing of elections and commencement of terms 2 Allocation of terms2.1 Prior to 1949 2.2 Proportional representation 2.3 Proposal for reform 2.4 Pragmatism wins3 ReferencesTiming of elections and commencement of terms[edit] Senate elections must be held within one year of the expiry of the fixed term of the senate
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Section 43 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 43 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
prevents a person from being a member of both houses of the Parliament of Australia
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Section 5 Of The Constitution Of Australia
Section 5 of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
empowers the Governor-General of Australia
Governor-General of Australia
to prorogue the Australian Parliament, thereby bringing the current legislative session to an end.[1] Prorogation clears all business pending before Parliament and allows the Houses to be called back on a particular date without triggering an election.[2][1] The date for the new session of Parliament may be specified either in the proroguing proclamation or when the Governor-General summons the Houses to meet again.[1]Contents1 20th century prorogations in Australia 2 2016 prorogation and recall of Parliament 3 See also 4 References20th century prorogations in Australia[edit] Prior to 1977, it was common for the federal Parliament to have up to three sessions, with Parliament being prorogued at the end of each session and recalled at the beginning of the next
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Chapter VIII Of The Constitution Of Australia
Chapter VIII of the Constitution of Australia
Constitution of Australia
provides the method for altering the Constitution. It contains only one section, section 128, which sets out the requirements for constitutional referendums by which the words of the Constitution may be altered.Contents1 Section 128 2 Amendment to section 3 History 4 ReferencesSection 128[edit] Section 128 provides that the Constitution may only be amended by referendum, and specifies the procedures for referendums
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Chapter III Court
In Australian constitutional law, Chapter III Courts are courts of law which are a part of the Australian federal judiciary and thus are able to discharge Commonwealth judicial power
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