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Second Italo–Ethiopian War
 ItalyItalian Libya Italian Eritrea Italian SomalilandCommanders and leaders Haile Selassie
Haile Selassie
I Imru Haile Selassie Kassa Haile Darge Seyum Mangasha Mulugeta Yeggazu † Desta Damtew  Nasibu Emmanual  (WIA) Benito Mussolini Victor Emmanuel III Emilio De Bono Pietro Badoglio Rodolfo Graziani Giovanni Messe Hamid Idris Awate Olol DinleStrengthc. 800,000 combatants (c. 330,000 mobilized) 13 aircraft 4 tanks and 7 armored cars Approx. 500,000 combatants (Approx. 100,000 mobilized) Approx. 595 aircraft[2] c. 795 tanks[2]Casualties and lossesc. 377,500 combatants killed c. 382,800 civilian deaths 1935–1941.[3][b] 10,000 killed1 (est. May 1936) 44,000 wounded (est. May 1936) 9,555 killed2 (est. 1936–1940) 144,000 sick and wounded (est
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Interwar Period
In the context of the history of the 20th century, the interwar period was the period between the end of the First World War in November 1918 and the beginning of the Second World War in September 1939. Despite the relatively short period of time, this period represented an era of significant changes worldwide. Petroleum and associated mechanisation expanded dramatically leading to the Roaring Twenties (and the Golden Twenties), a period of economic prosperity and growth for the middle class in North America, Europe and many other parts of the world. Automobiles, electric lighting, radio broadcasts and more became commonplace among populations in the developed world
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March Of The Iron Will
 Italy Italian Eritrea EthiopiaCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Abebe Aregai  Haile Mariam MammoStrength12,500 Italians 4,000 Eritreans unknownCasualties and losses~170 Eritreans killed 4 Italians captured unknownv t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe March of the Iron Will
March of the Iron Will
(Marcia della ferrea volontà),[1][2] or the Iron-Will Column (Colonna della ferrea volontà),[3] was a Fascist propaganda event staged during the final days of the Second Italo-Ethiopian War
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De Bono's Invasion Of Abyssinia
 Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Emilio De Bono Ras Seyum Dejazmach
Dejazmach
Haile Selassie Gugsa (POW)StrengthApprox. 125,000 Approx. 15,000v t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis Ababa De Bono's invasion of Abyssinia
De Bono's invasion of Abyssinia
took place during the opening stages of the Second Italo-Abyssinian War
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Christmas Offensive
Ethiopian victoryItalians on the northern front forced to fall back 12 milesBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leadersPietro Badoglio Ras Kassa Ras Seyoum Ras Imru Ras MulugetaStrengthApprox. 125,000 Approx. 190,000Casualties and losses3,000 killed (Ethiopian claim) Unknownv t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Christmas Offensive took place during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War
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Battle Of Ganale Doria
Decisive Italian victoryDestruction of Ras Desta's southern armyBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Italian Somaliland Italian Libya Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Rodolfo Graziani Pietro Maletti Olol Diinle Desta Damtu Afawarq Walda Samayat † Beine MeridStrengthApproximately 20,000 Approximately 24,000Casualties and lossesLight 9,000 killed or missing Almost entire army ultimately neutralized as a fighting forcev t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Battle of Ganale Doria (also known as the Battle of Genale Dorya or as the Battle of Genale Wenz[1]) was a battle on the "southern front" fought during the Second Italo-Abyssinian War
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First Battle Of Tembien
Strategic Italian victoryEthiopian threat to the Italian I Corps and III Corps neutralizedBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Ras Kassa Ras SeyoumStrengthApproximately 70,000 Approximately 70,000Casualties and lossesApprox. 1,083 casualties Approx. 8,000 casualtiesv t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe First Battle of Tembien was a battle fought on the northern front of what was known as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. This battle consisted of attacks and counterattacks by Italian forces under Marshal Pietro Badoglio
Pietro Badoglio
and Ethiopian forces under Ras[nb 1] Kassa Haile Darge
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Battle Of Amba Aradam
Decisive Italian victoryDestruction of the Ethiopian army of the right in the northBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Ras Mulugeta  †StrengthApproximately 70,000 Approximately 80,000Casualties and lossesApprox. 800 casualties Approx. 6,000 killed, Approx. 12,000 wounded Almost entire army ultimately neutralized as a fighting forcev t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Battle of Amba Aradam
Amba Aradam
(also known as the Battle of Enderta[1]) was a battle fought on the northern front of what was known as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. This battle consisted of attacks and counterattacks by Italian forces under Marshal of Italy
Marshal of Italy
Pietro Badoglio and Ethiopian forces under Ras[nb 1] Mulugeta Yeggazu
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Second Battle Of Tembien
Decisive Italian victoryDestruction of the Ethiopian Army of the Center in the northBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Ras Kassa Ras SeyoumStrengthApproximately 70,000, With Approx. 50,000 in reserve Approximately 40,000Casualties and lossesApprox. 600 Approx. 8,000 Almost entire army ultimately neutralized as a fighting forcev t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Second Battle of Tembien was a battle fought on the northern front of what was known as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. This battle consisted of attacks by Italian forces under Marshal
Marshal
Pietro Badoglio on Ethiopian forces under Ras[nb 1] Kassa Haile Darge
Kassa Haile Darge
and Ras Seyoum Mangasha
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Battle Of Shire
Decisive Italian victoryDestruction of Ethiopian army of the left in the northBelligerents Kingdom of Italy  Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Ras ImruStrengthApproximately 47,000 Approximately 23,500Casualties and lossesApprox. 1,000 killed and wounded Approx. 4,000 killed and wounded Almost entire army ultimately neutralized as a fighting forcev t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Battle of Shire (Italian: Battaglia dello Mayatutors) was a battle fought on the northern front of what was known as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War
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Battle Of Maychew
Decisive Italian victoryDestruction of Haile Selassie's last army in the northBelligerents Kingdom of Italy Italian Eritrea Ethiopian EmpireCommanders and leaders Pietro Badoglio Haile SelassieStrength40,000 (with another 40,000 in reserve)[1] 31,000 (including six battalions of the Imperial Guard)[1]Casualties and losses400 Italians killed and wounded, 873 Eritreans killed and wounded[1] Between 1,000 and 8,000 killed,[1] roughly 11,000 total casualties[2]v t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Battle of Maychew
Maychew
(also known as the Battle of Mai Ceu) was the last major battle fought on the northern front during the Second Italo-Abyssinian War
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Battle Of The Ogaden
 ItalyItalian Somaliland EthiopiaCommanders and leaders Rodolfo Graziani Ras Nasibu Wehib PashaStrengthApprox. 38,000[nb 1] Approx. 30,000[nb 2]Casualties and lossesApprox. 2,000 casualties Approx. 5,000 casualtiesv t eSecond Italo-Abyssinian WarDe Bono Christmas Ganale Doria 1st Tembien Enderta 2nd Tembien Shire Maychew Ogaden Addis AbabaThe Battle of the Ogaden
Ogaden
was fought in 1936 in the southern front of the Second Italo-Abyssinian War. The battle consisted of attacks by the Italian forces of General Rodolfo Graziani, the Commander-in-Chief of the forces on the "southern front," against Ethiopian defensive positions commanded by Ras Nasibu Emmanual. The strong defensive positions were designed by Wehib Pasha and known as the "Hindenburg Wall"
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Treaty Of Versailles
The Treaty of Versailles
Versailles
(French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I
World War I
to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand which directly lead to World War I. The other Central Powers
Central Powers
on the German side of World War I
World War I
signed separate treaties.[8] Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty
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Olol Dinle
Sultan Olol Dinle (Somali: Suldaan Olol Diinle) (?-1960s)[1] was a Somali sultan who ruled Kelafo
Kelafo
as the head of the Ajuran clan. He successively offered allegiance to the Kingdom of Italy
Italy
in the 1920s and was named "Sultan of Sciavelli (Shabelle)" in the early 1930s.Contents1 Background 2 Conflict with Ethiopia 3 Death 4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] The Ajuran clan, under the Gareen Dynasty, had once ruled a powerful Imamate
Imamate
in the Somali region of Ethiopia
Ethiopia
centered at Kelafo
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Treaty Of Trianon
The Treaty of Trianon
Treaty of Trianon
was the peace agreement of 1920 to formally end World War I
World War I
between most of the Allies of World War I[1] and the Kingdom of Hungary, the latter being one of the successor states to Austria-Hungary.[2][3][4][5] The treaty regulated the status of an independent Hungarian state and defined its borders. It left Hungary as a landlocked state covering 93,073 square kilometres (35,936 sq mi), only 28% of the 325,411 square kilometres (125,642 sq mi) that had constituted the pre-war Kingdom of Hungary
Hungary
(the Hungarian half of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy)
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Treaty Of Rapallo (1920)
The Treaty of Rapallo
Rapallo
was a treaty between the Kingdom of Italy
Italy
and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes
Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes
(renamed Yugoslavia in 1929), signed to solve the dispute over some territories in the former Austrian Littoral
Austrian Littoral
in the upper Adriatic, and in Dalmatia. The treaty was signed on 12 November 1920[1] in Rapallo, near Genoa, Italy
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