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Sebastokrator
Sebastokrator
Sebastokrator
(Greek: σεβαστοκράτωρ, sebastokrátor; Bulgarian and Serbian Cyrillic: севастократор; both pronounced sevastokrator), was a senior court title in the late Byzantine Empire. It was also used by other rulers whose states bordered the Empire or were within its sphere of influence (Bulgarian Empire, Serbian Empire). The word is a compound of "sebastos" ("venerable", the Greek equivalent of the Latin Augustus) and "krátor" ("ruler", the same element as is found in "autokrator", "emperor")
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Pendilia
Pendilia
Pendilia
(singular pendilium; from Latin
Latin
pendulus, hanging) or pendoulia (the Greek equivalent), are pendants or dangling ornaments hanging from a piece of metalwork such as a crown, votive crown, crux gemmata, or kamelaukion, and are a feature of Early Medieval goldsmith work. On crosses the pendilia may include the letters alpha and omega, and on votive offerings, which were often designed to be hung over altars and where pendilia are at their largest and most spectacular, they may spell out whole words (see illustration). The term is commonly used in coin collecting. Pendilia
Pendilia
are depicted on coins as jewels or pearls hanging from the sides of the crown, and occur frequently on coins of Byzantine emperors. The pendilia which hung from the Emperors' crowns began with Marcian. Although the years saw the styles of crown change, the pendilia remained, at least through Manuel II Palaiologos
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Bulgarian Language
 Moldova  Ukraine  Serbia  Albania  RomaniaRegulated by Institute for the Bulgarian language
Bulgarian language
at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Институт за български език при Българската академия на науките (БАН))Language codesISO 639-1 bgISO 639-2 bulISO 639-3 bulGlottolog bulg1262[7]Linguasphere 53-AAA-hb < 53-AAA-hThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Stockings
Stockings (also known as hose, especially in a historical context) are close-fitting, variously elastic garments covering the leg from the foot up to the knee or possibly part or all of the thigh. Stockings vary in color, design, and transparency
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Boots
A boot is a type of footwear and a specific type of shoe. Most boots mainly cover the foot and the ankle, while some also cover some part of the lower calf. Some boots extend up the leg, sometimes as far as the knee or even the hip. Most boots have a heel that is clearly distinguishable from the rest of the sole, even if the two are made of one piece. Traditionally made of leather or rubber, modern boots are made from a variety of materials
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George Akropolites
George Akropolites (Latinized as Acropolites or Acropolita; Greek: Γεῶργιος Ἀκροπολίτης, Georgios Akropolitês, 1217 or 1220 – 1282) was a Byzantine Greek historian and statesman born at Constantinople.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Editions 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] In his sixteenth year he was sent by his father, the logothete Constantine Akropolites the elder, to the court of John III Doukas Vatatzes, emperor of Nicaea, where Akropolites continued his studies under Theodore Hexapterygos and Nicephorus Blemmydes. The emperor afterwards entrusted George with important state missions, as did his successors ( Theodore II Laskaris
Theodore II Laskaris
and Michael VIII Palaiologos). The office of Grand Logothete, or chancellor, was bestowed upon him in 1244. As commander in the field in 1257 against Michael II, despot of Epirus, he showed little military ability
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Eagles
Eagle
Eagle
is the common name for many large birds of prey of the family Accipitridae. Eagles belong to several groups of genera, not all of which are closely related. Most of the 60 species of eagle are from Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa.[1] Outside this area, just 14 species can be found—2 in North America, 9 in Central and South America, and 3 in Australia.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Groups3.1 Fish eagles 3.2 Booted eagles 3.3 Snake
Snake
eagles 3.4 Harpy eagles4 Species 5 Eagles in culture5.1 Etymology 5.2 Religion
Religion
and folklore 5.3 Heraldry6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksDescription Eagles are large, powerfully built birds of prey, with heavy heads and beaks. Even the smallest eagles, such as the booted eagle (Aquila pennata), which is comparable in size to a common buzzard (Buteo buteo) or red-tailed hawk (B
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Pseudo-Kodinos
George Kodinos or Codinus (Greek: Γεώργιος Κωδινός), also Pseudo-Kodinos, kouropalates in the Byzantine
Byzantine
court, is the reputed 14th-century author of three extant works in late Byzantine literature. Their attribution to him is merely a matter of convenience, two of them being anonymous in the manuscripts. Οf Kodinos himself nothing is known; it is supposed that he lived towards the end of the 15th century. The works referred to are the following:Patria (Πάτρια Κωνσταντινουπόλεως), treating of the history, topography, and monuments of Constantinople. It is divided into five sections: (a) the foundation of the city; (b) its situation, limits and topography; (c) its statues, works of art, and other notable sights; (d) its buildings; (e) and the construction of the Hagia Sophia
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John VI Kantakouzenos
John VI Kantakouzenos, Cantacuzenus, or Cantacuzene[1] (Greek: Ἰωάννης ΣΤʹ Καντακουζηνός, Iōannēs ST′ Kantakouzēnos; Latin: Johannes Cantacuzenus;[2] c. 1292 – 15 June 1383) was a Greek nobleman, statesman, and general. He served as Grand Domestic
Grand Domestic
under Andronikos III Palaiologos
Andronikos III Palaiologos
and regent for John V Palaiologos
Palaiologos
before reigning as Byzantine emperor
Byzantine emperor
in his own right from 1347 to 1354
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Fourth Crusade
Crusaders:Republic of Venice Holy Roman EmpireMarch of Montferrat County of Hainaut Prince-Bishopric of Halberstadt Pairis AbbeyKingdom of FranceCounty of Champagne County of Blois Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Saint-Pol Île-de-France AmiensByzantine Empire Second Bulgarian EmpireCommanders and leadersEnrico Dandolo Boniface I of Montferrat Theobald III of Champagne Balduin of Flanders Louis I of Blois Hugh IV of Saint-Pol Conrad of Halberstadt Martin of Pairis Alexios IV
Alexios IV
AngelosAlexios III Angelos
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Horse Tack
Tack is a piece of equipment or accessory equipped on horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. Saddles, stirrups, bridles, halters, reins, bits, harnesses, martingales, and breastplates are all forms of horse tack. Equipping a horse is often referred to as tacking up. A room to store such equipment, usually near or in a stable, is a tack room.Contents1 Saddles1.1 Saddle
Saddle
accessories 1.2 Stirrups2 Headgear2.1 Halters 2.2 Bridles 2.3 Hackamores and other bitless designs 2.4 Other headgear3 Reins 4 Bits 5 Harness 6 Breastplates and martingales 7 Associated accoutrements 8 See also 9 ReferencesSaddles[edit] Main article: SaddleA horse equipped with a saddle for mounted police.Saddles are seats for the rider, fastened to the horse's back by means of a girth (English-style riding), known as a cinch in the Western US, a wide strap that goes around the horse at a point about four inches behind the forelegs
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Saddle Blanket
The terms saddle blanket, saddle pad (or numnah), and saddle cloth refer to blankets, pads or fabrics inserted under a saddle. These are usually used to absorb sweat, cushion the saddle, and protect the horse's back. There are lighter types of saddle cloth, such as the shabrack, used primarily for decorative purposes, often placed over the top of a more utilitarian pad. Saddle
Saddle
blankets have been used for many centuries with all types of saddles. Some are a single thickness, others are made to be folded and used with a double thickness. Although a pad or blanket cannot take the place of a properly fitted saddle, pads with shims or blankets with a special design can partially compensate for minor fitting problems. The most blanket-like style is associated with the American-style western saddle. It is usually made of wool, cotton, or synthetic fabrics with similar characteristics
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INK
Ink
Ink
is a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design. Ink
Ink
is used for drawing or writing with a pen, brush, or quill. Thicker inks, in paste form, are used extensively in letterpress and lithographic printing. Ink
Ink
can be a complex medium, composed of solvents, pigments, dyes, resins, lubricants, solubilizers, surfactants, particulate matter, fluorescents, and other materials
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Medieval Serbian Noble Titles
In the Medieval Serbian state, a range of court and honorific titles were used.Contents1 Overview 2 Titles 3 References 4 SourcesOverview[edit] During the reign of King Stefan Milutin (r. 1282–1321) the Serbian court hierarchy was: stavilac, čelnik, kaznac, tepčija and vojvoda, the supreme title.[1] In the Dečani chrysobulls, King Stefan Dečanski (r
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Serbia
Coordinates: 44°N 21°E / 44°N 21°E / 44; 21Republic of Serbia Република Србија (Serbian) Republika Srbija  (Serbian)FlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Боже правде / Bože pravde" "God of Justice"Location of Serbia
Serbia
(green) and the disputed territory of Kosovo
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