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Seattle Opera
Seattle
Seattle
Opera
Opera
is an opera company located in Seattle, Washington. Founded in 1963 by Glynn Ross, who served as the company's first general director through 1983, Seattle
Seattle
Opera's season runs from August to late May, with five or six operas offered and with eight to ten performances each, often with double casts in major roles to allow for successive evening presentations. The second general director of Seattle
Seattle
Opera
Opera
was Speight Jenkins, who retired in 2014. He was replaced by Aidan Lang. Since August 2003, the company has presented operas in the Marion Oliver McCaw Hall, built on the site of the old Seattle
Seattle
Opera
Opera
House at Seattle
Seattle
Center
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Vincenzo Bellini
Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (Italian: [vinˈtʃɛntso salvaˈtoːre karˈmɛːlo franˈtʃesko belˈliːni] ( listen); 3 November 1801 – 23 September 1835) was an Italian opera composer,[1][2] who was known for his long-flowing melodic lines for which he was named "the Swan of Catania".[3] Many years later, in 1898, Giuseppe Verdi
Giuseppe Verdi
"praised the broad curves of Bellini's melody: 'there are extremely long melodies as no-one else had ever made before'."[4] A large amount of what is known about Bellini's life and his activities comes from surviving letters—except for a short period—which were written over his lifetime to his friend Francesco Florimo, whom he had met as a fellow student in Naples
Naples
and with whom he maintained a lifelong friendship
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Bumper Sticker
A bumper sticker is an adhesive label or sticker with a message, intended to be attached to the bumper of an automobile and to be read by the occupants of other vehicles—although they are often stuck onto other objects. Most bumper stickers are about 30 cm by 8 cm (12 in by 3 in) and are often made of PVC.Contents1 Purpose 2 Application and removal 3 History 4 Around the world 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesPurpose[edit]"How's my driving" bumper stickers are often used on commercial vehicles so that employers can receive feedback about the driving habits of their employees.Bumper stickers can be commercial, religious, secular, humorous, or in support of a sports team or other organization. They may promote or oppose a particular philosophical or political position. In some countries, such as the United States, bumper stickers are a popular way of showing support for a candidate for a government seat and become more common during election years
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Peter Kaczorowski
Peter Kaczorowski (born 1956, Buffalo, New York) is a theatrical lighting designer. He is credited with lighting designs for Broadway and off-Broadway shows, as well extensive work in opera. He has been nominated five times for Tony Awards
Tony Awards
and won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for The Producers and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Contact. He is also the recipient of Outer Critics, Drama-Logue, Ovation and Hewes design awards
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Martin Pakledinaz
Martin Pakledinaz (September 1, 1953 – July 8, 2012) was an American costume designer for stage and film. He won his Tony Awards for designing the costumes for Thoroughly Modern Millie and the 2000 revival of Kiss Me, Kate, which also earned him the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design. His most recent costume designs were for the Broadway shows Nice Work If You Can Get It (2012); Man and Boy (revival, 2011); Master Class (revival 2011) and The Normal Heart. He worked on the 1995 production of Holiday at the Circle in the Square Theatre. He designed costumes for plays for the leading regional theatres of the United States, and the Royal Dramatic Theatre of Sweden.[1] Opera credits include works at the New York Metropolitan Opera (Lucia di Lammermoor, Rodelinda, Iphigénie en Tauride) and the New York City Opera, as well as opera houses in Seattle, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Sante Fe, Houston, and Toronto
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Hermann Michael
 Hermann Michel (help·info), sometimes referred to as "Preacher" (born 23 April 1912, allegedly died 8 August 1984), was a Nazi and SS-Oberscharführer (Staff Sergeant). During World War II, he participated in the extermination of Jews at the Sobibór extermination camp during the Nazi operation known as Aktion Reinhard. Biography[edit]Hermann MichelHermann Michel was born on 23 April 1912 in the Holzheim district of Bavaria, German Empire. In the mid-1930s, he began working as a nurse at the Berlin-Buch medical center. By the late 1930s, along with Franz Stangl and Christian Wirth, he was working as a head nurse at Hartheim killing center, where the physically and mentally disabled were exterminated by gassing and lethal injection as part of the T-4 Euthanasia Program.[1] In April 1942, SS-Obersturmführer (First Lieutenant) Franz Stangl was appointed commander of Sobibór
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Tannhäuser (opera)
Tannhäuser
Tannhäuser
(German: [ˈtanˌhɔʏ̯zɐ]; full title Tannhäuser
Tannhäuser
und der Sängerkrieg
Sängerkrieg
auf der Wartburg, " Tannhäuser
Tannhäuser
and the Minnesingers' Contest at the Wartburg") is an 1845 opera in three acts, music and text by Richard Wagner, based on two German legends; Tannhäuser, the legendary medieval German Minnesänger
Minnesänger
and poet, and the tale of the Wartburg
Wartburg
Song Contest. The story centers on the struggle between sacred and profane love, and redemption through love, a theme running through much of Wagner's mature work. Wagner made a number of revisions of the opera throughout his life and was still unsatisfied with its format when he died
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Armin Jordan
Armin Jordan (9 April 1932 – 20 September 2006) was a Swiss conductor known for his interpretations of French music, Mozart and Wagner. Armin Jordan was born in Lucerne, Switzerland. "Mr. Jordan was a large man, with a slab of a face and a full mouth, often twisted in a sardonic smile, and his powerful physical presence belied the careful near-understatement of his conducting", noted The New York Times in his obituary. Jordan was most unusual at a time when conductors flew about the world from one engagement to another. For the most part he stayed close to home in Switzerland
Switzerland
and France. After leading a number of Swiss orchestras he became principal conductor of the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Geneva
Geneva
in 1985, a position he held until 1997. Armin Jordan did not conduct in the United States until 1985. He appeared in Seattle
Seattle
and New York City
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Opera Company
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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English National Opera
English National Opera
English National Opera
(ENO) is an opera company based in London, resident at the London Coliseum
London Coliseum
in St. Martin's Lane. It is one of the two principal opera companies in London, along with The Royal Opera, Covent Garden. ENO's productions are sung in English. The company's origins were in the late 19th century, when the philanthropist Emma Cons, later assisted by her niece Lilian Baylis, presented theatrical and operatic performances at the Old Vic, for the benefit of local people. Baylis subsequently built up both the opera and the theatre companies, and later added a ballet company; these evolved into ENO, the Royal National Theatre
Royal National Theatre
and The Royal Ballet, respectively. Baylis acquired and rebuilt the Sadler's Wells
Sadler's Wells
theatre in north London, a larger house, better suited to opera than the Old Vic
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Bayreuth Festival
The Bayreuth
Bayreuth
Festival (German: Bayreuther Festspiele) is a music festival held annually in Bayreuth, Germany, at which performances of operas by the 19th-century German composer Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner
are presented. Wagner himself conceived and promoted the idea of a special festival to showcase his own works, in particular his monumental cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen
Der Ring des Nibelungen
and Parsifal. Performances take place in a specially designed theatre, the Bayreuth Festspielhaus. Wagner personally supervised the design and construction of the theatre, which contained many architectural innovations to accommodate the huge orchestras for which Wagner wrote as well as the composer's particular vision about the staging of his works
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Das Rheingold
Das Rheingold
Das Rheingold
( pronunciation (help·info); The Rhinegold), WWV 86A, is the first of the four music dramas that constitute Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, or in English, 'The Ring of the Nibelung'. Das Rheingold
Das Rheingold
premiered at the National Theatre Munich
National Theatre Munich
on 22 September 1869, with August Kindermann
August Kindermann
in the role of Wotan, Heinrich Vogl
Heinrich Vogl
as Loge, and Karl Fischer as Alberich. Wagner wanted this work to premiere as part of the entire cycle, but was forced to allow the performance at the insistence of his patron King Ludwig II of Bavaria. The work was first performed as part of the complete cycle on 13 August 1876, in the Bayreuth
Bayreuth
Festspielhaus
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Götterdämmerung
Götterdämmerung
Götterdämmerung
(German: [ˈɡœtɐˌdɛməʁʊŋ] ( listen); Twilight of the Gods),[1] WWV 86D, is the last in Richard Wagner's cycle of four music dramas titled Der Ring des Nibelungen
Der Ring des Nibelungen
(The Ring of the Nibelung, or The Ring for short). It received its premiere at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus on 17 August 1876, as part of the first complete performance of the Ring. The title is a translation into German of the Old Norse
Old Norse
phrase Ragnarök, which in Norse mythology
Norse mythology
refers to a prophesied war among various beings and gods that ultimately results in the burning, immersion in water, and renewal of the world
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Siegfried (opera)
Siegfried, WWV 86C, is the third of the four music dramas that constitute Der Ring des Nibelungen
Der Ring des Nibelungen
(The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. It premiered at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus
Bayreuth Festspielhaus
on 16 August 1876, as part of the first complete performance of The Ring cycle.Contents1 Background 2 Sources 3 Roles 4 Synopsis4.1 Act 14.1.1 Scene 1 4.1.2 Scene 2 4.1.3 Scene 34.2 Act 24.2.1 Scene 1 4.2.2 Scene 2 4.2.3 Scene 34.3 Act 34.3.1 Scene 1 4.3.2 Scene 2 4.3.3 Scene 35 Recordings 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] See also: Der Ring des Nibelungen: Composition of the text and Der Ring des Nibelungen: Composition of the music The libretto of Siegfried was drafted by Wagner in November–December 1852, based on an earlier version he had prepared in May–June 1851 and originally entitled Jung- Siegfried (Young Siegfried), later changed to Der junge Siegfried
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Die Walküre
Die Walküre
Die Walküre
(The Valkyrie), WWV 86B, is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner
with a German libretto by the composer. It is the second of the four works that form Wagner's cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung). The story of Die Walküre
Die Walküre
is based on the Norse mythology
Norse mythology
told in the Volsunga Saga and the Poetic Edda.[1][2] In Norse mythology, a valkyrie is one in a group of female figures who decide which soldiers die in battle and which live. Die Walküre's best-known excerpt is the "Ride of the Valkyries". It received its premiere at the Königliches Hof- und National-Theater in Munich on 26 June 1870
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Der Ring Des Nibelungen
Der Ring des Nibelungen
Der Ring des Nibelungen
(The Ring of the Nibelung), WWV 86, is a cycle of four German-language epic music dramas composed by Richard Wagner. The works are based loosely on characters from the Norse sagas and the Nibelungenlied. The composer termed the cycle a "Bühnenfestspiel" (stage festival play), structured in three days preceded by a Vorabend ("preliminary evening"). It is often referred to as the Ring Cycle, Wagner's Ring, or simply The Ring. Wagner wrote the libretto and music over the course of about twenty-six years, from 1848 to 1874
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