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Scroll (parchment)
A scroll (from the Old French escroe or escroue), also known as a roll, is a roll of papyrus, parchment, or paper containing writing.[1]Contents1 Structure 2 History of scroll use 3 Rolls 4 Scotland 5 Replacement by the codex 6 Recent discovery 7 Modern technology 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksStructure[edit] A scroll is usually divided up into pages, which are sometimes separate sheets of papyrus or parchment glued together at the edges, or may be marked divisions of a continuous roll of writing material. The scroll is usually unrolled so that one page is exposed at a time, for writing or reading, with the remaining pages rolled up to the left and right of the visible page
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Scroll (other)
A scroll is a roll of parchment, papyrus, or paper, which has been drawn or written upon. Scroll
Scroll
may also refer to: Art[edit] Scroll
Scroll
(art), an element o
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Paleography
Palaeography
Palaeography
(UK) or paleography (US; ultimately from Greek: παλαιός, palaiós, "old", and γράφειν, graphein, "to write") is the study of ancient and historical handwriting (that is to say, of the forms and processes of writing, not the textual content of documents). Included in the discipline is the practice of deciphering, reading, and dating historical manuscripts,[2] and the cultural context of writing, including the methods with which writing and books were produced, and the history of scriptoria.[3] The discipline is important for understanding, authenticating, and dating ancient texts
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Acts Of Parliament In The United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom, Acts of Parliament are primary legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom.[1][2] Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, as a result of the Glorious Revolution and the assertion of parliamentary sovereignty, are supreme law that cannot be overturned by any body other than Parliament. As a result of devolution, the National Assembly for Wales, the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Assembly, and the Scottish Parliament
Scottish Parliament
are able to create primary legislation for their respective devolved institutions. These devolved legislatures are able to create legislation regarding all but reserved and excepted matters. However, Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
remain supreme and can overrule the devolved legislatures
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Parliamentary Archives
The Parliamentary Archives
Parliamentary Archives
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
preserves and makes available to public the records of the House of Lords
House of Lords
and House of Commons back to 1497, as well as some 200 other collections of Parliamentary interest. The present title was officially adopted in November 2006, as a change from the previous title, House of Lords Record Office. Over three million records are held by the Archives in the Victoria Tower of the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
on 5.5 miles of shelving
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Palace Of Westminster
The Palace of Westminster
Westminster
is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames
River Thames
in the City of Westminster, in central London. Its name, which is derived from the neighbouring Westminster
Westminster
Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence
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Kingdom Of Scotland
The Kingdom of Scotland
Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Rìoghachd na h-Alba; Scots: Kinrick o Scotland) was a sovereign state in northwest Europe traditionally said to have been founded in 843. Its territories expanded and shrank, but it came to occupy the northern third of the island of Great Britain, sharing a land border to the south with the Kingdom of England. It suffered many invasions by the English, but under Robert I it fought a successful war of independence and remained an independent state throughout the late Middle Ages. In 1603, James VI of Scotland
Scotland
became King of England, joining Scotland
Scotland
with England in a personal union
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Herculaneum Papyri
The Herculaneum
Herculaneum
papyri are more than 1,800 papyri found in the Herculaneum
Herculaneum
Villa of the Papyri, in the 18th century, carbonized by the eruption of
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Hanging Scroll
A hanging scroll (Chinese: 立軸; pinyin: lìzhóu; also called 軸 or 掛軸)[1] is one of the many traditional ways to display and exhibit East Asian painting and calligraphy
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Handscroll
The handscroll is a long narrow scroll for displaying a series of scenes in East Asian painting and calligraphy
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Sefer Torah
A Sefer Torah
Torah
(Hebrew: ספר תורה‬; " Book
Book
of Torah" or "Torah scroll"; plural: ספרי תורה‬ Sifrei Torah) is a handwritten copy of the Torah, the holiest book in Judaism. It must meet extremely strict standards of production. The Torah
Torah
scroll is mainly used in the ritual of Torah
Torah
reading during Jewish prayers. At other times, it is stored in the holiest spot within a synagogue, the Torah
Torah
ark, which is usually an ornate curtained-off cabinet or section of the synagogue built along the wall that most closely faces Jerusalem, the direction Jews
Jews
face when praying. The text of the Torah
Torah
is also commonly printed and bound in book form for non-ritual functions
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The Joshua Roll
The Joshua Roll
Joshua Roll
is a Byzantine illuminated manuscript of highly unusual format, probably of the 10th century Macedonian Renaissance,[1] believed to have been created by artists of the Imperial workshops in Constantinople,[2] and now in the Vatican Library.[3]Contents1 Form and content 2 Style 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksForm and content[edit] The Roll is in the form of a continuous horizontal scroll or rotulus, common in Chinese art, but all but unique in surviving examples of medieval Christian art.[4]
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Vellum
Vellum
Vellum
is prepared animal skin or "membrane" used as a material for writing on
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Woodblock Printing
Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
is a technique for printing text, images or patterns used widely throughout East Asia
East Asia
and originating in China
China
in antiquity as a method of printing on textiles and later paper. As a method of printing on cloth, the earliest surviving examples from China
China
date to before 220 AD. Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
existed in Tang China during the 7th century AD and remained the most common East Asian method of printing books and other texts, as well as images, until the 19th century. Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
is the best known type of Japanese woodblock art print
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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WebCite
WebCite is an on-demand archiving service, designed to digitally preserve scientific and educationally important material on the web by making snapshots of Internet contents as they existed at the time when a blogger, or a scholar or a editor cited or quoted from it. The preservation service enables verifiability of claims supported by the cited sources even when the original web pages are being revised, removed, or disappear for other reasons, an effect known as link rot.[3]Contents1 Comparison to other services 2 History 3 Fundraising 4 Process 5 Business model5.1 DMCA
DMCA
requests6 Copyright issues 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksComparison to other services[edit] The service differs from the short time Google Cache copies by having indefinite archiving and by offering on-the-fly archiving
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