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Scout Method
The Scout method
Scout method
is the informal educational system used by Scouts. The aim of Scouting
Scouting
is character training with the goal of helping participants become independent and helpful,[1] and thereby become "healthy, happy, helpful citizens".[2] The Scout method
Scout method
uses appealing games in the primitive outdoors to generate challenges which a Scout learns to solve by himself.[1] Through the training and the example of the leader, Scouts
Scouts
are taught independence, leadership, the ambition to learn by himself, and a moral code with positive goals
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Education
Education
Education
is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education
Education
frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves.[1] Education
Education
can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational
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Educational Progressivism
Progressive education is a pedagogical movement that began in the late nineteenth century; it has persisted in various forms to the present. The term progressive was engaged to distinguish this education from the traditional Euro-American curricula of the 19th century, which was rooted in classical preparation for the university and strongly differentiated by social class. By contrast, progressive education finds its roots in present experience
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László Nagy (Scouting)
László Nagy (September 2, 1921 – December 18, 2009; Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈlaːsloː ˈnɒɟ]) was the Secretary General of the World Organization of the Scout Movement
World Organization of the Scout Movement
from May 1, 1968, to October 31, 1988. A Swiss citizen of Hungarian origin, he was a sociologist, a historian, a Doctor of Political Science, a former journalist and the author of a number of books on politics.Contents1 Biography 2 Books published 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Nagy was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1921, discovered Scouting
Scouting
and went on to become an assistant Scoutmaster. He attended the 4th World Scout Jamboree held in Gödöllő, Hungary
Gödöllő, Hungary
in 1933. Nagy received a Masters in sociology and law, and a PhD
PhD
in political science
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Jamboree (Scouting)
In Scouting, a jamboree is a large gathering of Scouts who rally at a national or international level. The 1st World Scout Jamboree
1st World Scout Jamboree
was held in 1920, and was hosted by the United Kingdom. Since then, there have been twenty three World Scout Jamborees, hosted in various countries, generally every four years. The 24th World Jamboree is to be held in North America in 2019. There are also national and continental jamborees held around the world with varying frequency
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Philosophy Of Religion
Philosophy
Philosophy
of religion is "the philosophical examination of the central themes and concepts involved in religious traditions."[1] These sorts of philosophical discussion are ancient, and can be found in the earliest known manuscripts concerning philosophy. The field is related to many other branches of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics.[2] The philosophy of religion differs from religious philosophy in that it seeks to discuss questions regarding the nature of religion as a whole, rather than examining the problems brought forth by a particular belief system
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Scout Troop
A Scout troop
Scout troop
is a term adopted into use with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and the Scout Movement to describe their basic units. The term troop echoes a group of mounted scouts in the military or an expedition and follows the terms cavalry, mounted infantry and mounted police use for organizational units.[1] Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Scout Movement[edit] In the Scout Movement, a Scout troop
Scout troop
is an organizational unit consisting of a number of patrols of Scouts, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or Girl Guides. Girl Guides often use the terms unit instead of patrol and company instead of troop. The initial organization unit in the Scout Movement was a patrol of about 6 to 8 Scouts. Where there were a number of patrols, they could form a Scout troop.[2] Scout troops are composed of boys and/or girls usually aged 10 to 18 years
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Beavers (Scouting)
Beavers is one name for programs associated with Scouting
Scouting
for young children usually aged 6 to 8 1/2. A participant in the program is called a Beaver. A group of Beavers is often called a "Colony". The programme is based on co-operating and sharing. Some Scouting organizations have programs for similar ages but use different names such as Keas or Joeys. The Beavers program was originated in Northern Ireland in the 1960s to provide a program for boys who were too young to be Cubs.[1] Beavers or similar programs were adopted by many other Scouting
Scouting
organizations, in particular Canada. The Canadian program was developed by three people: Harry McCartney who was the Manitoba Executive Scout Director and the author of the Beaver Book, "Friends of the Forest"; Alan Jones who was a Winnipeg Scout Executive and Gordon Hanna who was part of the United Way Youth Council and was asked by Harry to be the Project Coordinator
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Cub Scout
Cub Scouts, Cubs or Wolf Cubs are programs associated with Scouting for young children usually between 5 and 12, depending on the national organization to which they belong. A participant in the program is called a Cub. A group of Cubs is called a 'Pack'. The Wolf Cub program was originated by The Boy Scouts Association in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in 1916 to provide a program for boys who were too young to be Boy Scouts. It was adopted by many other Scouting organizations. Many Scouting
Scouting
organizations, including The Scout Association, no longer use the Wolf Cub program and have replaced it with other programs but have retained the name Cubs. Others, including Traditional Scouting
Scouting
organizations, maintain the original Wolf Cubs program. Originally Cubs programs were open only to boys, while young girls could join the Brownies
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Venture Scout
Venturer or Venture Scouts are programs in some Scouting
Scouting
organisations for young people of various age ranges in the 14–20 age range. A participant in the program is called a Venturer.Contents1 Australia 2 Brazil 3 Scouts Canada 4 Scouting
Scouting
Ireland 5 Japan 6 Malta 7 Singapore 8 United Kingdom: The Scout Association 9 United States 10 See also 11 ReferencesAustralia[edit] Main article: Venturer Scouts (Australia) The Venturer Scout
Venturer Scout
program in Scouts Australia, often just known as Venturers, is a program for young people 14.5–17.5 years old.[1] The program is flexible, but usually with a strong outdoor flavour. The highest award that can be earned by a Venturer Scout
Venturer Scout
is the Queen's Scout award
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Rover Scout
Rover Scouts, Rovers, Rover Scouting
Scouting
or Rovering is a service[citation needed] program associated with Scouting
Scouting
for young men, and in many countries, women into their early 20s. A group of Rovers is called a 'Rover Crew'. The Rover program was originated by The Boy Scouts Association in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in 1918 to provide a program for young men who had grown up beyond the age range of the Boy Scouts. It was quickly adopted by many other national Scouting
Scouting
organizations. Many Scouting
Scouting
organisations, including The Scout Association, no longer include a Rover program
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Rainbow (Girl Guides)
Rainbows is the youngest section of GirlGuiding in the UK. They are between the ages of 5 and 7 in England, Scotland and Wales but in Northern Ireland the age range is 4-7 years old.[1] It is the Guiding equivalent of the Beaver Scouts. At the age of about seven, a Rainbow will usually become a Brownie. In the UK, Rainbows started in 1987[2] with Lynsey Hickling being the first in the UK. In the United States
United States
the equivalent is a Daisy Girl Scout; in Canada the equivalent is a Spark, and in New Zealand they are called 'Pippins'.Contents1 Uniform 2 The Promise 3 The Jigsaw 4 The Song 5 External links 6 ReferencesUniform[edit] The current uniform, since 2004, consists of a blue and red polo shirt with the Rainbow logo on it, a red hooded jacket and a choice of either tracksuit bottoms or cycling shorts, which the girls are encouraged to pick themselves. All items come in the Rainbow colours of light blue and red
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Brownie (Girl Guides)
Brownies
Brownies
are the section in the Girl Guides
Girl Guides
organization for girls aged seven years old to ten years old.[1] Exact age limits are slightly different in each organization.Contents1 History1.1 Italian History 1.2 United Kingdom2 Motto, Promise and Law2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 Hong Kong 2.4 Ireland 2.5 Singapore 2.6 United Kingdom 2.7 United States3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Brownies, originally called Rosebuds,[2] were first organized by Lord Baden-Powell in 1914, to complete the range of age groups for girls in Scouting
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Air Scouts
Air Scouts
Air Scouts
are members of the international Scouting
Scouting
movement with a particular emphasis on an aviation themed programme and/or flying-based activities. Air Scouts
Air Scouts
follow the same basic Scouting programme as normal Scouts, but they devote certain amounts of time focused on their air activities. Air Scouts
Air Scouts
often wear a slightly different uniform from the rest of the Scouting
Scouting
movement and/or may have additional badges/insignia. Most air activities are ground based like visits to airports and air museums, radio controlled model flight, aero modelling and camping on airfields
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Extension Scouting
Extension Scouting
Scouting
is a programme within Scouting
Scouting
which caters for young people with special needs. Extension Scouting
Scouting
for young people with special needs was originally called Scouts Malgré Tout, which is French for "Scouts Despite Everything". It aims to meet the mandate from the founder of Scouting Robert Baden-Powell that the programme be made "open to all". Many young people with special needs join in with Scout Groups on a regular basis, but some organisations provide a parallel programme specifically tailored to these members. For example, The Scout Association of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
has various Scoutlink groups around the country. The Extension Scouting
Scouting
section in the Netherlands is named "Blauwe Vogels" (Blue Birds) after the play L'Oiseau Bleu by Maurice Maeterlinck
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Lone Guides
Lone Guides or Lones are those Girl Guides
Girl Guides
and Girl Scouts who do not attend group meetings for a variety of reasons. They are organised into groups that keep in touch, for example, by letter or email. Members carry out their organisation's normal programme on their own as much as they are able. The first official Lone Guides started in 1912 in the UK
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