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Scottsdale, Arizona
Scottsdale (O'odham: Vaṣai S-vaṣonĭ; Yaqui: Eskatel) is a city in the eastern part of Maricopa County, Arizona, part of the Greater Phoenix Area. Named Scottsdale in 1894 after founder Winfield Scott and incorporated in 1951 with a population of 2,000, the 2015 population of the city is estimated to be 236,839 according to the U.S. Census
Census
Bureau.[5] The New York Times
The New York Times
described downtown Scottsdale as "a desert version of Miami's South Beach" and as having "plenty of late night partying and a buzzing hotel scene."[6] Its slogan is "The West's Most Western Town."[7] Scottsdale, 31 miles long and 11.4 miles wide at its widest point, shares boundaries with many other municipalities and entities. On the west, Scottsdale is bordered by Phoenix, Paradise Valley and unincorporated Maricopa County
Maricopa County
land
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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Hohokam
The Hohokam
Hohokam
(/hoʊhoʊˈkɑːm/) were an ancient Native American culture centered in the present US state of Arizona. The Hohokam
Hohokam
are one of the four major cultures of the American Southwest and northern Mexico in Southwestern archaeology. Considered part of the Oasisamerica
Oasisamerica
tradition, the Hohokam
Hohokam
established significant trading centers such as at Snaketown, and are considered to be the builders of the original canal system around the Phoenix metropolitan area, which the Mormon pioneers rebuilt when they settled the Lehi area of Mesa near Red Mountain. Variant spellings in current, official usage include Hobokam, Huhugam, and Huhukam. The Hohokam
Hohokam
culture was differentiated from others in the region in the 1930s by archaeologist Harold S
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Federal Information Processing Standard
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cas
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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O'odham Language
O'odham (pronounced [ˈʔɔʔɔðɦam]) or Papago-Pima is a Uto-Aztecan language of southern Arizona
Arizona
and northern Sonora, Mexico, where the Tohono O'odham
Tohono O'odham
(formerly called the Papago) and Akimel O'odham (traditionally called Pima) reside.[4] In 2000 there were estimated to be approximately 9,750 speakers in the United States
United States
and Mexico
Mexico
combined, although there may be more due to underreporting. It is the 10th most-spoken indigenous language in the United States, the 3rd most-spoken indigenous language in Arizona
Arizona
after Western Apache and Navajo
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Yaqui Language
Yaqui (or Hiaki), locally known as Yoeme or Yoem Noki, is a Native American language of the Uto-Aztecan family. It is spoken by about 20,000 Yaqui people, in the Mexican state of Sonora and across the border in Arizona in the United States.Contents1 Phonology1.1 Vowels 1.2 Consonants1.2.1 Glottal stops1.3 Sound symbolism 1.4 Devoicing 1.5 Gestures2 Grammar2.1 Syntax 2.2 Word order structures2.2.1 Subject object[3] 2.2.2 Subject verb object[3] 2.2.3 Object subject verb[3]2.3 Case 2.4 Nouns 2.5 Verbs 2.6 Adjectives 2.7 Reduplication3 Sample words and phrases3.1 Kinship terminology4 Language revitalization and teaching 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksPhonology[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Miami
Miami
Miami
(/maɪˈæmi/; Spanish pronunciation: [miˈami]) is a major port city on the Atlantic coast of south Florida
Florida
in the southeastern United States. As the seat of Miami-Dade County, the municipality is the principal, central, and the most populous city of the Miami metropolitan area and part of the second-most populous metropolis in the southeastern United States.[8] According to the U.S
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South Beach
South Beach, also nicknamed SoBe, is a neighborhood in the city of Miami
Miami
Beach, Florida, United States, located due east of Miami
Miami
city proper between Biscayne Bay
Biscayne Bay
and the Atlantic Ocean. The area encompasses all of the barrier islands of Miami
Miami
Beach south of Indian Creek. This area was the first section of Miami
Miami
Beach to be developed, starting in the 1910s, due to the development efforts of Carl G. Fisher, the Lummus Brothers, and John S. Collins, the latter of whose construction of the Collins Bridge
Collins Bridge
provided the first vital land link between mainland Miami
Miami
and the beaches. The area has gone through numerous artificial and natural changes over the years, including a booming regional economy, increased tourism, and the 1926 hurricane, which destroyed much of the area
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Pima People
The Pima /ˈpiːmə/[3] (or Akimel O'odham, also spelled Akimel O'otham, "River People", formerly known as Pima) are a group of Native Americans living in an area consisting of what is now central and southern Arizona. The majority population of the surviving two bands of the Akimel O'odham are based in two reservations: the Keli Akimel O'otham on the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) and the On'k Akimel O'odham on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC). They are closely related to other river people, the Ak-Chin O'odham, now forming the Ak-Chin Indian Community. They are also related to the Sobaipuri, whose descendants reside on the San Xavier Indian Reservation or Wa:k (together with the Tohono O'odham), and in the Salt River Indian Community
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UTC-7
UTC−07:00 is a time offset that subtracts 7 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Mountain Time Zone during standard time, and in the Pacific Time Zone
Pacific Time Zone
during the other 8 months (see Daylight saving time). A few places use it year-round.Contents1 As standard time (Northern Hemisphere winter)1.1 North America2 As daylight saving time (Northern Hemisphere summer)2.1 North America3 As standard time (all year round)3.1 North AmericaAs standard time (Northern Hemisphere winter)[edit] Principal cities: Calgary, Denver North America[edit] Canada
Canada
- Mountain Time
Mountain Time
ZoneAlberta British Columbia
British Columbia
(Creston, Cranbrook and Fort St
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O'odham
The O'odham peoples, including the Tohono O'odham, the Pima or Akimel O'odham, and the Hia C-ed O'odham, are an indigenous Uto-Aztecan peoples of the Sonoran desert in southern and central Arizona and northern Sonora, united by a common heritage language, the O'odham language. Today, many O'odham live in the Tohono O'odham Nation, the San Xavier Indian Reservation, the Gila River Indian Community, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, the Ak-Chin Indian Community or off-reservation in one of the cities or towns of Arizona.This article about ethnicity or ethnology is a stub
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Tohono O'odham
The Tohono O’odham (/toʊˈhɑːnə ˈɑːtʊm/ or /tɑːˈhoʊnə ˈɑːtəm/)[2] are a Native American people of the Sonoran Desert, residing primarily in the U.S. state of Arizona
Arizona
and the Mexican state of Sonora. Tohono O’odham means "Desert People." The federally recognized tribe is known as the Tohono O'odham
Tohono O'odham
Nation. The Tohono O’odham tribal government and most of the people have rejected the customary English name Papago, used by Europeans after being adopted by Spanish conquistadores from hearing other Piman bands call them this
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Phoenix Street Railway
The Phoenix Street Railway provided streetcar service in Phoenix, Arizona, from 1887 to 1948. The motto was, "Ride a Mile and Smile the While."[1]Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 Operating Pattern, 1938 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The line was founded in 1887 by Moses Hazeltine Sherman and used horse-drawn carts. Beginning in 1893, however, the railway was completely electrified. The line was popular with the locals and was partly responsible for the growth patterns observed in the early history of Phoenix. In 1911, the first of several planned interurban lines opened to Glendale; additional lines were planned but never built to Tempe, Mesa, and Scottsdale.[1] The system reached its height in the 1920s with several line extensions
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