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Schwabacher
The German word Schwabacher
Schwabacher
(pronounced [ˈʃvaːˌbaxɐ]) refers to a specific blackletter typeface which evolved from Gothic Textualis (Textura) under the influence of Humanist type design in Italy during the 15th century. Schwabacher
Schwabacher
typesetting was the most common typeface in Germany, until it was replaced by Fraktur
Fraktur
from the mid 16th century onwards.Contents1 Etymology 2 Characteristics 3 History 4 Samples 5 Notes and references 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The term derives from the Franconian town of Schwabach, where in 1529 the Articles of Schwabach, a Lutheran creed, were adopted
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Reichsleiter
Reichsleiter (national leader or Reich leader) was the second highest political rank of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP), next only to the office of Führer. Reichsleiter also served as a paramilitary rank in the Nazi Party and was the highest position attainable in any Nazi organisation.[1] The Reichsleiter reported directly to Adolf Hitler
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Augsburg
Augsburg
Augsburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈʔaʊ̯ksbʊʁk] ( listen); Austro-Bavarian: Augschburg) is a city in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany. It was a Free Imperial City
Free Imperial City
for over 500 years, and is notable for the Augsburg
Augsburg
Confession. It is a university town and home of the Regierungsbezirk
Regierungsbezirk
Schwaben and the Bezirk Schwaben. Augsburg
Augsburg
is an urban district and home to the institutions of the Landkreis Augsburg
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Umlaut (diacritic)
The diaeresis (/daɪˈɛrɪsɪs/ dy-ERR-ə-sis; plural: diaereses), also spelled diæresis or dieresis and also known as the tréma (also: trema) or the umlaut, is a diacritical mark that consists of two dots ( ¨ ) placed over a letter, usually a vowel. When that letter is an i or a j, the diacritic replaces the tittle: ï.[1] The diaeresis and the umlaut are diacritics marking two distinct phonological phenomena. The diaeresis represents the phenomenon also known as diaeresis or hiatus in which a vowel letter is pronounced separately from an adjacent vowel and not as part of a digraph or diphthong. The umlaut (/ˈʊmlaʊt/ UUM-lowt), in contrast, indicates a sound shift. These two diacritics originated separately; the diaeresis is considerably older. Nevertheless, in modern computer systems using Unicode, the umlaut and diaeresis diacritics are identical, e.g
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Bastarda
Bastarda
Bastarda
(or bastard) was a blackletter script used in France, the Burgundian Netherlands and Germany during the 14th and 15th centuries. The Burgundian variant of script can be seen as the court script of the Dukes of Burgundy and was used to produce some of the most magnificent manuscripts of the 15th century. The early printers produced regional versions in type which were used especially to print texts in the vernacular languages, more rarely for Latin texts. The earliest bastarda type was produced by the German Gutenberg in 1454–55. The main variety was the one used in France,[citation needed] which was also found in Geneva, Antwerp and London[further explanation needed]. Another local variety was found in the Netherlands; Caxton's first types were a rather poor copy of this[citation needed]
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Max Amann
Max Amann
Max Amann
(24 November 1891 – 30 March 1957) was a German politician, businessman and a member of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) that ruled Germany from 1933 to 1945. He was the first business manager of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
and later became the head of Eher Verlag, the official Nazi Party
Nazi Party
publishing house. After the war ended, Amann was arrested by Allied troops and deemed a Hauptschuldiger (Prominent Guilty Party) and sentenced to ten years in a labour camp. He was released in 1953. Amann died in poverty on 30 March 1957, in Munich.Contents1 Biography 2 References2.1 Sources3 External linksBiography[edit] Amann was born in Munich
Munich
on 24 November 1891
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Nuremberg Chronicle
The Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Chronicle is an illustrated biblical paraphrase and world history that follows the story of human history related in the Bible; it includes the histories of a number of important Western cities. Written in Latin
Latin
by Hartmann Schedel, with a version in German, translation by Georg Alt, it appeared in 1493. It is one of the best-documented early printed books—an incunabulum—and one of the first to successfully integrate illustrations and text. Latin
Latin
scholars refer to it as Liber Chronicarum (Book of Chronicles) as this phrase appears in the index introduction of the Latin
Latin
edition. English-speakers have long referred to it as the Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Chronicle after the city in which it was published
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Martin Bormann
Martin Bormann
Martin Bormann
(17 June 1900 – 2 May 1945) was a prominent official in Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
as head of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
Chancellery. He gained immense power by using his position as Adolf Hitler's private secretary to control the flow of information and access to Hitler. He succeeded Hitler as Party Minister of the National Socialist German Workers' Party after Hitler's suicide
Hitler's suicide
on 30 April 1945. Bormann joined a paramilitary Freikorps
Freikorps
organisation in 1922 while working as manager of a large estate
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Nazi Party
Hitler
Hitler
YouthDeutsches Jungvolk League of German GirlsParamilitary wings Sturmabteilung SchutzstaffelSports body National Socialist League
National Socialist League
of the
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Luther Bible
The Luther Bible
Bible
(German: Lutherbibel) is a German language
German language
Bible translation from Hebrew and ancient Greek by Martin Luther
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Apocalypse (Dürer)
The Apocalypse, properly Apocalypse with Pictures (Latin: Apocalypsis cum Figuris)[1] is a famous series of fifteen woodcuts by Albrecht Dürer of scenes from the Book of Revelation, published in 1498, which rapidly brought him fame across Europe.[2] The series was probably cut on pear wood blocks and drew on theological advice, particularly from Johannes Pirckheimer, the father of Dürer's friend Willibald Pirckheimer. Work on the series started during Dürer's first trip to Italy (1494–95), and the set was published simultaneously in Latin and German at Nuremberg
Nuremberg
in 1498, at a time when much of Europe anticipated a possible Last Judgment
Last Judgment
at 1500. The most famous print in the series is The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (ca
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Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer
(/ˈdʊərər, ˈdjʊərər/;[1] German: [ˈalbʁɛçt ˈdyːʁɐ]; 21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528)[2] was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints. He was in communication with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini
Giovanni Bellini
and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 he was patronized by emperor Maximilian I. Dürer is commemorated by both the Lutheran and Episcopal Churches.The Expulsion From Paradise by Albrecht DürerDürer's vast body of work includes engravings, his preferred technique in his later prints, altarpieces, portraits and self-portraits, watercolours and books
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Anton Koberger
Anton Koberger[1] (c. 1440/1445 – 3 October 1513) was the German goldsmith, printer and publisher who printed and published the Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Chronicle, a landmark of incunabula, and was a successful bookseller of works from other printers. He established in 1470 the first printing house in Nuremberg. Anton Koberger
Anton Koberger
was born to an established Nuremberg
Nuremberg
family of bakers, and makes his first appearance in 1464 in the Nuremberg
Nuremberg
list of citizens. In 1470 he married Ursula Ingram and after her death he remarried another member of the Nuremberg
Nuremberg
patriciate, Margarete Holzschuher, in 1491. In all he fathered twenty-five children, of whom thirteen survived to adulthood. Koberger was the godfather of Albrecht Dürer, whose family lived on the same street
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Free Imperial City Of Nuremberg
The Imperial City of Nuremberg (German: Reichsstadt Nürnberg) was a free imperial city — independent city-state — within the Holy Roman Empire. After Nuremberg gained piecemeal independence from the Burgraviate of Nuremberg in the High Middle Ages and considerable territory from Bavaria in the Landshut War of Succession, it grew to become one of the largest and most important Imperial cities, the 'unofficial capital' of the Empire, particularly because Imperial Diets (Reichstage) and courts met at Nuremberg Castle. The Diets of Nuremberg were an important part of the administrative structure of the Empire. The Golden Bull of 1356, issued by Emperor Charles IV (reigned 1346–78), named Nuremberg as the city where newly elected kings of Germany must hold their first Imperial Diet, making Nuremberg one of the three highest cities of the Empire.[1] The cultural flowering of Nuremberg, in the 15th and 16th centuries, made it the center of the German Renaissance
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