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Schools Of Islamic Theology
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Islamic View Of Angels
In Islam, Angels (Arabic: ملاك malāk; plural: ملاًئِكة mala'ikah) are celestrial beings, created from a luminious origin by God
God
to perform certain tasks He has given them. The Angels from the angelic realm are subordinates in a hierarchy headed by one of the Archangels in the highest heavens.[1] Belief in Angels is one of the six Articles of Faith in Islam.Contents1 Concepts of Angels1.1 As personified creatures 1.2 As abstract concepts2 Angels impeccability 3 Individual Angels3.1 Archangels 3.2 Other Angels and Angel
Angel
groups4 Vision of Angels 5 Distinction between Angels and Jinn 6 See also 7 NotesConcepts of Angels[edit] Islam
Islam
acknowledges the concept of Angels both as anthropomorphic and abstract.[2] As personified creatures[edit] Angels are another kind of creature created by God, known to mankind, commonly dwelling in the heavenly spheres
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Enjoining Good And Forbidding Wrong
Enjoining what is right and forbidding what is wrong[1][2] (Arabic: الأمر بالمَعْرُوف والنَهي عن المُنْكَر‎, translit. al-amr bi-l-maʿrūf wa-n-nahy ʿani-l-munkar) are two important Islamic requisites from the Quran, "you enjoin what is right and forbid what is reprehensible", and are considered positive roles in helping others to take the straight path and abstain from reprehensible acts.[1] This expression is the base of the Islamic institution of hisbah. It forms a central part of the Islamic doctrine for all Muslims
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Imamate
Imamate
Imamate
(Arabic: إمامة‎ imāmah) is a word derived from imam and meaning "leadership". Its use in theology is confined to Shia. An imam is the head or leader of an imamate and is similar to a caliph or khalifah with one major difference: While a caliph is more of a political head of a state, the imam (in imamate) is a religious as well as a political head of a group of people
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Islamic Calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is the artistic practice of handwriting and calligraphy, based upon the alphabet in the lands sharing a common Islamic cultural heritage. It includes Arabic Calligraphy, Ottoman, and Persian calligraphy.[1][2] It is known in Arabic as khatt Islami (خط اسلامي), meaning Islamic line, design, or construction.[3] The development of Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is strongly tied to the Qur'an; chapters and excerpts from the Qur'an
Qur'an
are a common and almost universal text upon which Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is based
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Islamic Holy Books
Islamic holy books
Islamic holy books
are the texts which Muslims believe were authored by Allah
Allah
via various prophets throughout humanity's history
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Prophecy (Shia Islam)
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Jihad
Jihad
Jihad
(English: /dʒɪˈhɑːd/; Arabic: جهاد‎ jihād [dʒɪˈhaːd]) is an Arabic
Arabic
word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim.[1][2][3][4] It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as s
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Batin (Islam)
Bāṭin (Arabic: باطن‎) literally means "inner", "inward", "hidden", etc. The Quran, for instance, has a hidden meaning in contrast to its exterior or apparent meaning, the Zahir. Sufis believe that every individual has a batin in the world of souls. It is the inward self of the individual; when cleansed with the light of one's spiritual guide, it elevates a person spiritually.[1][2] This notion is connected to Allah's attribute of the Hidden One, who cannot be seen but exists in every realm. Muslim groups believe that batin[3] can be fully understood only by a figure with esoteric knowledge
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Prophets And Messengers In Islam
Prophets in Islam
Islam
(Arabic: الأنبياء في الإسلام‎) include "messengers" (rasul, pl. rusul), bringers of a divine revelation via an angel (Arabic: ملائكة, malāʾikah);[1][2] and "prophets" (nabī, pl. anbiyāʼ), lawbringers that Muslims believe were sent by God
God
to every person, bringing God's message in a language they can understand.[1][3] Knowledge of the Islamic prophets is one of the six articles of the Islamic faith, and specifically mentioned in the Quran.[4] Muslims believe that the first prophet was also the first human being, Adam
Adam
(ادم), created by Allah
Allah
(الله). Many of the revelations delivered by the 48 prophets in Judaism and many prophets of Christianity are mentioned as such in the Quran
Quran
but usually in slightly different forms
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Hajj
The Hajj
Hajj
(/hædʒ/;[1] Arabic: حَجّ‎ Ḥaǧǧ "pilgrimage") is an annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca,[2] the holiest city for Muslims, and a mandatory religious duty for Muslims that must be carried out at least once in their lifetime by all adult Muslims who are physically and financially capable of undertaking the journey, and can support their family during their absence.[3][4][5] It is one of the five pillars of Islam, alongside Shahadah, Salat, Zakat
Zakat
and Sawm. The Hajj
Hajj
is the second largest annual gathering of Muslims in the world.[6] The state of being physically and financially capable of performing the Hajj
Hajj
is called istita'ah, and a Muslim
Muslim
who fulfills this condition is called a mustati
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Allah
Allah
Allah
(/ˈælə, ˈɑːlə, əlˈlɑː/;[1][2] Arabic: الله‎, translit. Allāh, pronounced [ɑɫˈɫɑː(h)] ( listen)) is the Arabic word for God
God
in Abrahamic religions
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Ta'tili
If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
has a definition already, change this tag to TWCleanup2 or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing the text on this page with Wi . If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
does not have the definition yet, consider moving the whole article to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing this tag with the template Copy to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
. This template will no longer automatically categorize articles as candidates to move to Wiktionary. Ta'tili
Ta'tili
is a term used to refer to Muslim individuals and groups accused of "divesting" God of his attributes.[1] References[edit]^ Bosworth, C.E.; van Donzel, E.; Heinrichs, W.P.; Lecomte, G.; Bearman, P.J.; Bianquis, Th. (2000). Encyclopaedia of Islam (New Edition). Volume X (T-U). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill
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Tashbih
Tashbih
Tashbih
(Arabic: تشبيه‎) is an Islamic religious concept meaning closeness. In Islamic theology, two opposite terms are attributed to Allah, tashbih and tanzih, or distance and transcendence. However, the fuller meaning of tashbih is 'affirming similarity', i.e. affirming Allah's nearness to humanity. This concept is eternally juxtaposed with Allah's tanzih (transcendence, or 'declaring incompatibility'). The literal meaning of the word is "to declare something similar to something else". This definition affirms that Allah
Allah
has some similarity to his creations: "Nothing is like Him." (Sura 42:11) but His attributes require some similarity to the world, as people associate compassion, mercy and wrath with our interpretation of such adjectives. The two, opposing aspects affect every aspect of a Muslim's belief, action and relationship with Allah
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Tanzih
Tanzih is an Islamic religious concept meaning transcendence. In Islamic theology, two opposite terms are attributed to Allah: tanzih and tashbih. The latter means "nearness, closeness, accessibility". However, the fuller meaning of tanzih is 'declaring incomparability', i.e. affirming Allah's transcendent distance from humanity. This concept is eternally juxtaposed with Allah's tashbih (closeness, or 'affirming similarity'). The literal meaning of the word is "to declare something pure and free of something else". This definition affirms that Allah cannot be likened to anything: "Nothing is like Him." (Sura 42:11) and reinforces the fundamental, underlying Islamic belief in tawhid. The Divine Names of Allah associated with tanzih are those that indicate distance, transcendence, awe and fear: King, Avenger, Knowing, Praiseworthy, Slayer, Strong, Abaser and Independent. References[edit] Murata, Sachiko; William C. Chittick (2000). The Vision of Islam. I. B. Tauris. pp. 267–282
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Names Of God In Islam
According to tradition (hadith), there are at least 99 names of God
God
in Islam, known as the ʾasmāʾu llāhi l-ḥusnā (Arabic: أسماء الله الحسنى‎) "Beautiful Names of God" (also الأسماء الحسنى ʾasmāʾu l-ḥusnā "Beautiful Names").[1][2] According to 9th-century collections of hadith, the tradition of there being "99 names" is ṣahīh (صَحِيح - reliable), while the tradition of the actual list of 99 names as given by some collectors, in at least three different variants, is stated to be gharīb (غَرِيب - scarce, unreliable).[3] Most names in these lists are divine epithets taken from the text of the Quran, with a minority based in oral tradition or Sunnah
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