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Scholastic Lutheran Christology
Scholastic Lutheran
Lutheran
Christology
Christology
is the orthodox Lutheran theology
Lutheran theology
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, developed using the methodology of Lutheran scholasticism. On the general basis of the Chalcedonian christology and following the indications of the Scriptures as the only rule of faith, the Protestant
Protestant
(especially the Lutheran) scholastics at the close of the sixteenth and during the seventeenth century, built some additional features and developed new aspects of Christ's person. The propelling cause was the Lutheran
Lutheran
doctrine of the real presence or omnipresence of Christ's body in the Lord's Supper, and the controversies growing out of it with the Zwinglians and Calvinists, and among the Lutherans themselves
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Hans Egede
Egede may refer to:PlacesEgede, Nigeria, a town in Enugu State of Nigeria Egede, a hamlet in the Dutch province of Overijssel Egede, a lunar crater Hans Egede Church, in Nuuk, GreenlandPeople Hans Poulsen Egede
Hans Poulsen Egede
(1686–1758), Dano-Norwegian mer
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Sola Gratia
Sola gratia (Latin: by grace alone) is one of the Five solae propounded to summarise the Lutheran
Lutheran
and Reformed
Reformed
leaders' basic beliefs during the Protestant Reformation.[1] These Lutheran
Lutheran
and Reformed
Reformed
leaders believed that this emphasis was in contradistinction to the teaching of the Catholic Church, though it had explicitly affirmed the doctrine of sola gratia in the year 529 at the Council of Orange, which condemned the Pelagian heresy.[2] As a response to this misunderstanding, Catholic doctrine was further clarified in the Council of Trent
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Awakening (religious Movement)
Awakening or The Awakening may refer to:Wakefulness, the state of being consciousContents1 Religion 2 Politics 3 Film and TV3.1 Film 3.2 Television4 Literature 5 Music5.1 Classical 5.2 Albums 5.3 Songs6 Games 7 Other uses 8 See alsoReligion[edit] Awakening (religious movement), a Lutheran movement in Finland Great Awakening, several periods of Anglo-American Christian revival
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Protestant Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Anointing Of The Sick
Anointing
Anointing
of the sick, known also by other names, is a form of religious anointing or "unction" (an older term with the same meaning) for the benefit of a sick person. It is practiced by many Christian churches and denominations. Anointing
Anointing
of the sick was a customary practice in many civilizations, including among the ancient Greeks and early Jewish communities
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Confession (Lutheran Church)
In the Lutheran Church, Confession (also called Holy Absolution) is the method given by Christ to the Church by which individual men and women may receive the forgiveness of sins; according to the Large Catechism, the "third sacrament" of Holy Absolution
Absolution
is properly viewed as an extension of Holy Baptism.[1]Contents1 Beliefs 2 Martin Luther
Martin Luther
on Confession 3 Form of Confession 4 ReferencesBeliefs[edit] The Lutheran Church practices "Confession and Absolution" [referred to as the Office of the Keys] with the emphasis on the absolution, which is God's word of forgiveness. Indeed, Lutherans highly regard Holy Absolution. They, like Roman Catholics, see James 5:16 and John 20:22-23 as biblical evidence for confession.[2] Confession and absolution is done in private to the pastor, called the "confessor" with the person confessing known as the "penitent"
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Luther Rose
The Luther seal or Luther rose
Luther rose
is a widely recognized symbol for Lutheranism. It was the seal that was designed for Martin Luther
Martin Luther
at the behest of John Frederick of Saxony in 1530, while Luther was staying at the Coburg
Coburg
Fortress during the Diet of Augsburg. Lazarus Spengler, to whom Luther wrote his interpretation below, sent Luther a drawing of this seal
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Criticism Of Protestantism
Criticism of Protestantism
Protestantism
covers critiques and questions raised about Protestantism, the movement based on Martin Luther's Reformation principles of 1517
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Homosexuality And Lutheranism
Lutheran viewpoints concerning homosexuality are diverse because there is no one worldwide body which represents all Lutherans. The Lutheran World Federation, a worldwide 'communion of churches' and the largest global body of Lutherans, contains member churches on both sides of the issue
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Universal Priesthood
The universal priesthood or the priesthood of all believers is a foundational concept of Christianity
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Churches Militant, Penitent, And Triumphant
In Christian
Christian
theology, the Christian Church
Christian Church
is traditionally divided into:the Church Militant (Latin: Ecclesia militans), which cons
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Baptism (Lutheran Church)
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Athanasian Creed
The Athanasian Creed, also known as Pseudo-Athanasian Creed
Creed
or Quicunque Vult (also Quicumque Vult), is a Christian statement of belief focused on Trinitarian doctrine and Christology. The Latin
Latin
name of the creed, Quicunque vult, is taken from the opening words, "Whosoever wishes". The creed has been used by Christian churches since the sixth century. It is the first creed in which the equality of the three persons of the Trinity
Trinity
is explicitly stated
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Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed
Creed
(Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νικαίας or, τῆς πίστεως, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because it was originally adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day İznik, Turkey) by the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325.[1] In 381, it was amended at the First Council of Constantinople, and the amended form is referred to as the Nicene or the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. The Oriental Orthodox and Assyrian churches use this profession of faith with the verbs in the original plural ("we believe") form, but the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic churches convert those verbs to the singular ("I believe")
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Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
(from Greek γνήσιος [gnesios]: genuine, authentic)[citation needed] is a modern name for a theological party in the Lutheran churches,[1] in opposition to the Philippists[2] after the death of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and before the Formula of Concord. In their own day they were called Flacians by their opponents and simply Lutherans by themselves. Later Flacian became to mean an adherent of Matthias Flacius' view of original sin, rejected by the Formula of Concord. In a broader meaning, the term Gnesio-Lutheran is associated mostly with the defence of the doctrine of Real Presence. Controversies[edit] After the death of Luther, many theological controversies arose among the Lutherans, mostly due to teaching of Philip Melanchthon. Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
were profiled by defending Martin Luther's doctrine, in the beginning led by Matthias Flacius
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