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Schism
A schism (pronounced /ˈsɪzəm/ SIZ-əm, /ˈskɪzəm/ SKIZ-əm or, less commonly, /ˈʃɪzəm/ SHIZ-əm[1]) is a division between people, usually belonging to an organization, movement, or religious denomination. The word is most frequently applied to a split in what had previously been a single religious body, such as the East–West Schism
Schism
or the Great Western Schism. It is also used of a split within a non-religious organization or movement or, more broadly, of a separation between two or more people, be it brothers, friends, lovers, etc. A schismatic is a person who creates or incites schism in an organization or who is a member of a splinter group. Schismatic as an adjective means pertaining to a schism or schisms, or to those ideas, policies, etc
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Bhikkhu
A bhikkhu (from Pali, Sanskrit: bhikṣu) is an ordained male monastic ("monk") in Buddhism.[1] Male and female monastics ("nun", bhikkhuni ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
bhikṣuṇī)) are members of the Buddhist community.[2] The lives of all Buddhist monastics are governed by a set of rules called the prātimokṣa or pātimokkha.[1] Their lifestyles are shaped to support their spiritual practice: to live a simple and meditative life and attain nirvana.[3] A person under the age of 20 cannot be ordained as a bhikkhu or bhikkhuni but can be ordained as a śrāmaṇera or śrāmaṇērī.Contents1 Definition 2 Historical terms in Western literature 3 Ord
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Schools Of Buddhism
Schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
are the various institutional and doctrinal divisions of Buddhism
Buddhism
that have existed from ancient times up to the present. The classification and nature of various doctrinal, philosophical or cultural facets or schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
is vague and has been interpreted in many different ways, often due to the sheer number (perhaps thousands) of different sects, subsects, movements, etc. that have made up or currently make up the whole of Buddhist traditions
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Doctrine
Doctrine (from Latin: doctrina) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or belief system. The Greek analogue is the etymology of catechism.[1] Often doctrine specifically suggests a body of religious principles as it is promulgated by a church, but not necessarily; doctrine is also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common law traditions, established through a history of past decisions, such as the doctrine of self-defense, or the principle of fair use, or the more narrowly applicable first-sale doctrine
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Bhutan
Coordinates: 27°25′01″N 90°26′06″E / 27.417°N 90.435°E / 27.417; 90.435Kingdom of Bhutan འབྲུག་རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ (Dzongkha) Druk
Druk
Gyal KhapFlagEmblemAnthem:  Druk
Druk
tsendhen The Thunder Dragon KingdomCapital and larg
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Drukpa Lineage
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa Buddhism Shambhala
Shambhala
BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:
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Tibetan Buddhism
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa
Kadampa
Buddhism Shambhala
Shambhala
BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPractices


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Thammayut Nikaya
Dhammayuttika Nikaya
Dhammayuttika Nikaya
(Pali; Thai: ธรรมยุติกนิกาย; RTGS: Thammayuttika Nikai; Khmer: ធម្មយុត្តិក និកាយ Thommoyouttek Nikeay), or Thammayut (Thai: ธรรมยุต) is an order of Theravada
Theravada
Buddhist bhikkhus (monks) in Thailand, Cambodia and Burma, with significant branches in the Western world. Its name is derived from Pali
Pali
dhamma ("teachings of the Buddha") + yutti (in accordance with) + ka (group)
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Mahanikaya
The Maha Nikaya
Nikaya
(literal translation: "Great Collection") is one of the two principal fraternities of modern Thai Buddhism. The Maha Nikaya
Nikaya
is the largest fraternity of Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Thailand. The other principal fraternity is the Dhammayuttika Nikaya. Generally, the Dhammayuttika Nikaya
Dhammayuttika Nikaya
fraternity is more strict than the Maha Nikaya
Nikaya
fraternity.[1][unreliable source?] History[edit] The identification of the Maha Nikāya as a single, discrete entity is an innovation of the Thai state
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Early Buddhist Schools
The early Buddhist schools are those schools into which the Buddhist monastic saṅgha initially split, due originally to differences in vinaya and later also due to doctrinal differences and geographical separation of groups of monks. The original saṅgha split into the first early schools (generally believed to be the Sthavira nikāya and the Mahāsāṃghika) a significant number of years after the passing away of Gautama Buddha. According to scholar Collett Cox "most scholars would agree that even though the roots of the earliest recognized groups predate Aśoka, their actual separation did not occur until after his death."[1] Later, these first early schools split into further divisions such as the Sarvāstivādins and the Dharmaguptakas, and ended up numbering, traditionally, about 18 or 20 schools. In fact, there are several overlapping lists of 18 schools preserved in the Buddhist tradition, totaling about twice as many, though some may be alternative names
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Devadatta
Devadatta
Devadatta
was by tradition a Buddhist monk, cousin and brother-in-law of Gautama Siddhārtha,[1] the Sākyamuni Buddha, and brother of Ānanda, a principal student of the Buddha
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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Apostasy
Apostasy
Apostasy
(/əˈpɒstəsi/; Greek: ἀποστασία apostasia, "a defection or revolt") is the formal disaffiliation from, or abandonment or renunciation of a religion by a person. It can also be defined within the broader context of embracing an opinion contrary to one's previous beliefs.[5] One who commits apostasy is known as an apostate. Committing apostasy is called apostatizing (or apostasizing -- also spelled apostacizing)
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Pope Peter I Of Alexandria
Pope
Pope
Peter I of Alexandria
Alexandria
(Coptic: Ⲡⲁⲡⲁ Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ ⲁ̅), 17th Pope
Pope
of Alexandria
Alexandria
& Patriarch
Patriarch
of the See of St. Mark. He is revered as a saint by the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Roman Catholic Church.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Martyrdom 3 Feast day 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] The Coptic Orthodox Church believes that Peter was given by his parents to His Holiness Theonas to be brought up as a priest, similarly to the story of Samuel
Samuel
in the Old Testament. He rose through the ranks of holy orders, first becoming a reader, then a deacon, then a priest
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Diocese Of Rome
The Diocese
Diocese
of Rome
Rome
(Latin: Dioecesis Urbis seu Romana,[2] Italian: Diocesi di Roma) is a diocese of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Rome. The Bishop
Bishop
of Rome
Rome
is the Pope, the Supreme Pontiff and head of the Catholic Church. As the Holy See, the papacy is a sovereign entity with diplomatic relations,[3] and civil jurisdiction over the Vatican City State located geographically within Rome. The Diocese
Diocese
of Rome
Rome
is the metropolitan diocese of the Province of Rome, an ecclesiastical province in Italy. The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
teaches that the first Bishop of Rome
Rome
was Saint Peter
Saint Peter
in the first century
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