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Scarba
Scarba
Scarba
(Scottish Gaelic: Sgarba) is a small island, in Argyll
Argyll
and Bute, Scotland, just north of the much larger island of Jura. The island was owned by Richard Hill, 7th Baron Sandys
Richard Hill, 7th Baron Sandys
and has not been permanently inhabited since the 1960s.[3] It is now covered in heather and used for grazing animals
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Scottish Gaelic Language
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
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Donald Monro (Dean)
Donald Monro (or Munro) (fl. 1526–1574) was a Scottish clergyman, who wrote an early and historically valuable description of the Hebrides
Hebrides
and other Scottish islands and enjoyed the honorific title of "Dean of the Isles".Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Language skills 4 Description of the Western Isles of Scotland 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksOrigins[edit] Donald Monro was born early in the 16th century, the eldest of the six sons of Alexander Monro of Kiltearn, by Janet, daughter of Farquhar Maclean of Dochgarroch
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Topographic Map
In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map
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Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) is a national mapping agency in the United Kingdom which covers the island of Great Britain.[1] It is one of the world's largest producers of maps. Since 1 April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ltd, a government-owned company, 100% in public ownership. The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Board remains accountable to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It is also a member of the Public Data Group. The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance and surveying), which was to map Scotland
Scotland
in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1745
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Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
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Crinan, Argyll And Bute
Crinan (Scottish Gaelic: An Crìonan) is a small village located on the west coast of Scotland
Scotland
in the region known as Knapdale, which is part of Argyll and Bute. Before the Crinan Canal
Crinan Canal
was built, Crinan was named Port Righ which meant the king's port. The canal was named from the small settlement of Crinan Ferry on the edge of Loch Crinan
Loch Crinan
where a small ferry landed. The name Crinan probably derives from the Creones
Creones
tribe who lived in the area in 140 AD.[1] The canal starts at Ardrishaig
Ardrishaig
sea lock on Loch Gilp, and ends nine miles away at Crinan sea lock on the Sound of Jura
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Triangulation Point
A triangulation station, also known as a triangulation pillar, trigonometrical station, trigonometrical point, trig station, trig beacon, or trig point, and sometimes informally as a trig, is a fixed surveying station, used in geodetic surveying and other surveying projects in its vicinity. The nomenclature varies regionally; they are generally known as trigonometrical or triangulation stations in North America, trig points in the United Kingdom, trig pillars in Ireland, trig stations or points in Australia
Australia
and New Zealand,[1] and trig beacons in South Africa; triangulation pillar is the more formal term for the concrete columns found in the UK.Contents1 Use 2 Stations worldwide2.1 Australia 2.2 Japan 2.3 South Africa 2.4 Spain 2.5 United Kingdom3 Photo gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUse[edit] The station is usually set up by a government with known coordinate and elevation published
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Lochs
Loch
Loch
(/lɒx/) is the Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Scots word for a lake or for a sea inlet. It is cognate with the Manx lough, Cornish logh, and the Welsh word for lake, llyn. In English English
English English
and Hiberno-English, the anglicised spelling lough (/lɒx/ or /lɒk/) is commonly found in place names; in Lowland Scots and Scottish English, the spelling "loch" is always used. Some lochs could also be called firths, fjords, estuaries, straits or bays. Sea-inlet lochs are often called sea lochs or sea loughs
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Luing
[3][4] [5] Luing
Luing
(Gaelic: Luinn) is one of the Slate
Slate
Islands, Firth of Lorn, in the west of Argyll
Argyll
in Scotland, about 16 miles (26 km) south of Oban. The island has an area of 1,430 hectares (5.5 sq mi) and is bounded by several small skerries and islets
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Marilyn (hill)
A Marilyn is a mountain or hill in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland
Ireland
or Isle of Man
Isle of Man
with a prominence of at least 150 metres (492 ft), regardless of absolute height or other merit. The name was coined as a punning contrast to the designation Munro, used for a Scottish mountain with a height of more than 3,000 feet (914.4 m), which is homophonous with (Marilyn) Monroe.Contents1 Numbers 2 In Scotland 3 Use for recreation 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksNumbers[edit] There are 2,010 Marilyns identified: 1,218 in Scotland, 454 in Ireland (of which 65 are in Northern Ireland), 175 in England, 158 in Wales, 5 on the Isle of Man
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United Kingdom Census 2011
A census of the population of the United Kingdom is taken every ten years. The 2011 census was held in all countries of the UK on 27 March 2011. It was the first UK census which could be completed online via the Internet.[1] The Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
(ONS) is responsible for the census in England
England
and Wales, the General Register Office for Scotland
Scotland
(GROS) is responsible for the census in Scotland, and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) is responsible for the census in Northern Ireland. The Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
is the executive office of the UK Statistics Authority, a non-ministerial department formed in 2008 and which reports directly to Parliament
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National Records Of Scotland
National Records of Scotland
Scotland
is a non-ministerial department of the Scottish Government. It is responsible for civil registration, the census in Scotland, demography and statistics, family history and the national archives and historical records.[1] National Records of Scotland
Scotland
was formed from the merger of the General Register Office for Scotland
Scotland
and the National Archives of Scotland
National Archives of Scotland
in 2011, and combines all the functions of the two former organisations.[2] The offices of Registrar General for Scotland
Scotland
and Keeper of the Records of Scotland
Scotland
both continue are combined in the person of Tim Ellis, Chief Executive of National Records of Scotland
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Donald Monro (Dean)
Donald Monro (or Munro) (fl. 1526–1574) was a Scottish clergyman, who wrote an early and historically valuable description of the Hebrides
Hebrides
and other Scottish islands and enjoyed the honorific title of "Dean of the Isles".Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Language skills 4 Description of the Western Isles of Scotland 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksOrigins[edit] Donald Monro was born early in the 16th century, the eldest of the six sons of Alexander Monro of Kiltearn, by Janet, daughter of Farquhar Maclean of Dochgarroch
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