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Sava Ban
The Uprising in Banat[a] was a rebellion organized and led by Serbian Orthodox bishop Teodor of Vršac and Sava Temišvarac
Sava Temišvarac
against the Ottomans in the Eyalet of Temeşvar. The uprising broke out in 1594, in the initial stage of the Long Turkish War, and was fought by local Serbs, numbering some 5,000, who managed to quickly take over several towns in the region before being crushed by the Ottoman army. The relics of Saint Sava
Saint Sava
were burnt by the Ottomans as a retaliation. Although short-lived, it inspired future rebellions.Contents1 Background1.1 Status of Serbs 1.2 Ottoman crisis2 Prelude 3 Uprising 4 Aftermath 5 Burning of St. Sava's remains 6 Legacy 7 Annotations 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksBackground[edit] Status of Serbs[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it
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Banat Rebellion (1808)
In 1808 a short-lived rebellion aimed at national and social liberation broke out in the Banat region in the Military Frontier of the Habsburg Monarchy, stirred by the First Serbian Uprising in the Sanjak of Smederevo of the Ottoman Empire.[1] Led by Serbs and Romanians,[2] it followed a short-lived Serb rebellion in Syrmia in 1807.[1] The initiators were Orthodox priest Dimitrije Georgijević (or Đorđević) from Kruščica, former Free Corps members, captain Marijan Jovanović (or Josipović) and oberstlieutenant Pivu Žumanka (or Šumanka), and young lieutenant Toma Skripeće (or Stipeće).[2][3] The organizers were in contact with the Serbian rebel leaders Milenko Stojković, Luka Lazarević and Petar Dobrnjac.[4] The rebellion was planned in the Wallachian-Illyrian Regiment.[2] The Serbs and Romanians each sought the liberation of their people.[3] Dimitrije Georgijević repeated to his followers that the main goal was the restoration of the Serbian Empire.[5] The rebellion, known
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Ziamet
Ziamet was a form of Land tenure in Ottoman Empire, consisting in grant of lands or revenues by the Ottoman Sultan
Ottoman Sultan
to an individual in compensation for his services, especially military services. The ziamet system was introduced by Osman I
Osman I
who granted land tenure to his troops. Later this system was expanded by Murad I
Murad I
for his Sipahi.Contents1 Background 2 History 3 Zeamet 4 NotesBackground[edit] The Saljuq
Saljuq
state, prior to the rise of the Ottoman State in the 14th century, utilized ziamets in an effort to implement provincial governors, who were also made subordinate chiefs in the military regime. In this pre-Ottoman period, timars were used with other tactics, such as building caravansaries, in an effort to sedentarize nomadic groups
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Martolos
The martolos was an internal security force of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
in the Balkans (Rumelia), mostly active between the 15th to 17th centuries. It initially constituted out of the local mostly Christian populations (Rum Millet), but over time members converted into Islam. For their military service, they were given privileged status (as askeri), in relation to the Rayah
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Nógrád
Nógrád
Nógrád
(Russian: Новгород, Novgorod-Ugorsky;[1][2] German: Neuburg; Slovak: Novohrad) is a village in Nógrád
Nógrád
County, Hungary.Nógrád, castle from a bird's eye viewEtymology[edit] The name comes from Slavic Novgrad ("New Castle") from which evolved Slovak Novohrad (with the same meaning) and Hungarian Nógrád. 1138/1329 civitas Naugrad, around 1200 castrum Nougrad, 1217 castrum de Nevgrad.[3] The village (1405 villa Newgrad) and the county was named after the castle. References[edit]^ Vernadsky, V. Voice from the Hungarian Ruthenia. "Russkaya Mysl". 1880 ^ Pogodin, A. Ruthenia Abroad. "Soikin Publishing". Petrograd 1915 ^ Branislav, Varsik (1994). "Osídlenie Novohradu a Ipeľskej kotliny vo svetle miestnych názvov". Kontinuita medzi veľkomoravskými Slovienmi a stredovekými severouhorskými Slovanmi (Slovákmi) (in Slovak). Veda. p. 115
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Sigismund Báthory
Sigismund Báthory
Báthory
(Hungarian: Báthory
Báthory
Zsigmond; 1573 – 27 March 1613) was Prince of Transylvania
Prince of Transylvania
several times between 1586 and 1602, and Duke of Racibórz and Opole in Silesia
Silesia
in 1598. His father, Christopher Báthory, ruled Transylvania as voivode (or deputy) of the absent prince, Stephen Báthory. Sigismund was still a child when the Diet of Transylvania
Diet of Transylvania
elected him voivode at his dying father's request in 1581. Initially, regency councils administered Transylvania on his behalf, but Stephen Báthory
Stephen Báthory
made János Ghyczy the sole regent in 1585. Sigismund adopted the title of prince after Stephen Báthory died. The Diet proclaimed Sigismund to be of age in 1588, but only after he agreed to expel the Jesuits
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Ban Of Lugos
Banate
Banate
of Lugos and Karánsebes (Hungarian: Karánsebesi-Lugosi bánság, Romanian: Banatul de Lugoj-Caransebeș, Serbian: Лугошка и карансебешка бановина / Lugoška i karansebeška banovina) was an administrative territorial entity of the vassal Ottoman Principality of Transylvania in the 16th century. It was located in the south-eastern part of the region of Banat.Contents1 History 2 Cities 3 Bans of Lugoj
Lugoj
and Caransebeș 4 See also 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Banate
Banate
of Lugos and Karánsebes was formed gradually between 1526–1536, after the battle of Mohács, when the Banate
Banate
of Severin was divided. Its eastern side, from Orsova (present-day Orșova), came under the jurisdiction of the Wallachian ruler
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Ferenc Geszti
Ferenc Geszti (Hungarian: Franciscus Gezthy, Hungarian: Geszti Ferenc/Gezthy Ferencz, Romanian: Ghesti Freanț, Serbo-Croatian: Franjo Gesti; 1545–11 May 1595) was a Transylvanian nobleman, the captain of Déva. He belonged to the Geszti family (also Gezthy, Gezti, Gesty, de Gezth). He was a Calvinist. In the beginning of the Long Turkish War (1593–1606) he was one of the main Transylvanian commanders. He and Đorđe Palotić, the Ban of Lugos, helped some Ottoman Christian mutineers at the frontier in the winter of 1593–94; these later grew in numbers and initiated the Uprising in Banat (1594). References[edit]Magyarország családai: czimerekkel és nemzékrendi táblákkal. Kiadja Ráth Mór. 1868. pp. 370–.  Mihály Balázs; Gizella Keserű (2000). György Enyedi and Central European Unitarianism in the 16-17th Centuries
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Chardak
A chardak (Croatian:Čardak, Serbian and Bulgarian: Чардак) is an old typical house in the Balkans. It usually has a fortified ground floor and a wooden upper floor. It used to be used as a protective small fort. References[edit]Милан Крухек: Крајишке утврде хрватског краљевства тијеком 16. стољећа, Институт за сувремену повијест - Библиотека хрватска повјесница. Загреб, 1995.Coordinates: 44°51′20″N 21°05′41″E / 44.8556°N 21.0947°E / 44.8556; 21.0947This architecture-related article is a stub
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Vršac
Vršac
Vršac
(Serbian Cyrillic: Вршац pronounced [ʋr̩̂ʃat͡s]) is a city located in the South Banat District
South Banat District
of the autonomous province of Vojvodina, Serbia. As of 2011, the city urban area has a population of 35,701, while the city administrative area has 52,026 inhabitants. It is located in the geographical region of Banat.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Inhabited places 4 Demographics4.1 Ethnic groups5 Economy and industry 6 Transportation 7 Tourist destinations7.1 Vršac
Vršac
Castle 7.2 Monasteries 7.3 Churches 7.4 Winery8 Gallery 9 Famous residents 10 International relations10.1 Consulate 10.2 Twin towns — sister cities11 Notes 12 Further reading 13 External linksName[edit] The name Vršac
Vršac
is of Serbian origin. It derived from the Slavic word vrh, meaning "summit"
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Bocșa
Bocșa
Bocșa
(Romanian pronunciation: [ˈbokʃa] ( listen); Hungarian: Boksánbánya; German: Deutsch-Bokschan, Neuwerk) is a town in Caraș-Severin County, in southwestern Romania, with a population of 15,842 in 2011.Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1966 16,015 —    1977 20,731 +29.4%1992 19,152 −7.6%2002 19,023 −0.7%2011 15,842 −16.7%Source: Census dataWikimedia Commons has media related to Bocșa.v t eCaraș-Severin County, RomaniaCities
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Vršac Fortress
The Vršac
Vršac
Castle
Castle
(Serbian: Вршачки замак, Vršački zamak) formerly known as " Vršac
Vršac
Tower" (Serbian: Вршачка кула, Vršačka kula) is a medieval fortress near Vršac, Vojvodina, Serbia. Only Donjon
Donjon
tower remained from the entire complex, but in 2009 reconstruction started, to recreate the entire Vršac Castle. Vršac
Vršac
Castle
Castle
was declared a Monument of Culture of Great Importance in 1991, and is protected by the Republic of Serbia.[1]Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Reconstruction 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] There are two theories about the origin of this fortress. According to the Turkish traveler, Evliya Çelebi, the fortress was built by the Serbian despot Đurađ Branković
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Mustafa Selaniki
Mustafa Selaniki (Turkish: Selanıkî Mustafa; "Mustafa of Salonica; died 1600), also known as Selanıkî Mustafa Efendi, was an Ottoman scholar and chronicler, whose Tarih-i Selâniki described the Ottoman Empire of 1563–1599. See also[edit]Salonicav t eOttoman historians15th centuryOruç Bey Aşıkpaşazade Enveri Ibn Kemal Neşri Şükrullah Tursun Bey16th centuryMustafa Âlî Lûtfi Paşa Matrakçı Nasuh Hoca Sadeddin Efendi Mustafa Selaniki Taşköprüzade17th centuryİbrahim Peçevi Solakzade Mehmed Hemdemi Kâtip Çelebi Münejjim Bashi Silahdar Fındklılı Mehmed Ağa Osman Aga of Temesvar Mustafa Naima18th centuryAhmed Resmî Efendi19th centuryAli Amiri Ahmed Cevdet PashaAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 10384293 LCCN: n87832623 SUDOC: 075703637This Ottoman biographical article is a stub
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Modava
Moldova Nouă
Moldova Nouă
(Romanian pronunciation: [molˌdova ˈnowə]; Hungarian: Újmoldova; German: Neumoldowa; Czech: Nová Moldava or Bošňák; Serbian: Нова Молдава) is a town in southwestern Romania
Romania
in Caraș-Severin County
Caraș-Severin County
(the historical region of Banat), in an area known as Clisura Dunării. It is located on the shores of the river Danube.The town administers three villages: Măcești, Moldova Veche and Moldovița. At the 2011 census, 81.2% of inhabitants were Romanians, 12.8% Serbs, 3.2% Roma, 1.3% Hungarians
Hungarians
and 0.8% Czechs
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Wallachia
Wallachia
Wallachia
or Walachia (Romanian: Țara Românească pronounced [ˈt͡sara romɨˈne̯askə]; archaic: Țeara Rumânească, Romanian Cyrillic alphabet: Цѣра Рȣмѫнѣскъ) is a historical and geographical region of Romania. It is situated north of the Lower Danube
Danube
and south of the Southern Carpathians. Wallachia
Wallachia
is traditionally divided into two sections, Muntenia (Greater Wallachia) and Oltenia
Oltenia
(Lesser Wallachia)
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Pančevo
Pančevo
Pančevo
(Serbian Cyrillic: Панчево, pronounced [pâːntʃeʋo], Hungarian: Pancsova, Romanian: Panciova, Slovak: Pánčevo) is a city and the administrative center of the South Banat District
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