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Satureja
Satureja
Satureja
is a genus of aromatic plants of the family Lamiaceae, related to rosemary and thyme. It is native to North Africa, southern and southeastern Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia. A few New World species were formerly included in Satureja, but they have all been moved to other genera. Several species are cultivated as culinary herbs called savory, and they have become established in the wild in a few places.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 Ecology and cultivation 3 Uses 4 Species[1]4.1 Formerly in Satureja5 Etymology 6 NotesDescription[edit] Satureja
Satureja
species may be annual or perennial
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Lepidoptera
Aglossata Glossata Heterobathmiina Zeugloptera Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
(/ˌlɛpɪˈdɒptərə/ lep-i-DOP-tər-ə) is an order of insects that includes butterflies and moths (both are called lepidopterans). About 180,000 species of the Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
are described, in 126 families[1] and 46 superfamilies,[2] 10% of the total described species of living organisms.[2][3] It is one of the most widespread and widely recognizable insect orders in the world.[4] The Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
show many variations of the basic body structure that have evolved to gain advantages in lifestyle and distribution
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Armenian Cuisine
Armenian cuisine
Armenian cuisine
includes the foods and cooking techniques of the Armenian people and traditional Armenian foods and dishes. The cuisine reflects the history and geography where Armenians
Armenians
have lived as well as sharing outside influences from European and Levantine cuisines. The cuisine also reflects the traditional crops and animals grown and raised in Armenian populated areas. The preparation of meat, fish, and vegetable dishes in an Armenian kitchen often requires stuffing, frothing, and puréeing.[1] Lamb, eggplant, and bread (lavash) are basic features of Armenian cuisine. Armenians
Armenians
traditionally used cracked wheat (bulgur) in preference to maize and rice.[2] The flavor of the food relies on the quality and freshness of the ingredients rather than on excessive use of spices.[3] Fresh herbs are used extensively, both in the food and as accompaniments
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Flower
A flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen
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Larva
A larva (plural: larvae /ˈlɑːrviː/) is a distinct juvenile form many animals undergo before metamorphosis into adults. Animals with indirect development such as insects, amphibians, or cnidarians typically have a larval phase of their life cycle. The larva's appearance is generally very different from the adult form (e.g. caterpillars and butterflies) including different unique structures and organs that do not occur in the adult form. Their diet may also be considerably different. Larvae are frequently adapted to environments separate from adults. For example, some larvae such as tadpoles live almost exclusively in aquatic environments, but can live outside water as adult frogs. By living in a distinct environment, larvae may be given shelter from predators and reduce competition for resources with the adult population. Animals in the larval stage will consume food to fuel their transition into the adult form
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Butterfly
Butterflies are insects in the macrolepidopteran clade Rhopalocera from the order Lepidoptera, which also includes moths. Adult butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. The group comprises the large superfamily Papilionoidea, which contains at least one former group, the skippers (formerly the superfamily "Hesperioidea") and the most recent analyses suggest it also contains the moth-butterflies (formerly the superfamily "Hedyloidea"). Butterfly
Butterfly
fossils date to the Paleocene, which was about 56 million years ago. Butterflies have the typical four-stage insect life cycle. Winged adults lay eggs on the food plant on which their larvae, known as caterpillars, will feed. The caterpillars grow, sometimes very rapidly, and when fully developed, pupate in a chrysalis
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Moth
Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth,[1] many of which are yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.Contents1 Differences between butterflies and moths 2 Etymology 3 Caterpillar 4 History 5 Economics5.1 Significance to humans 5.2 Predators and parasites6 Attraction to light 7 Notable moths 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksDifferences between butterflies and moths[edit] Main article: Comparison of butterflies and moths While the butterflies form a monophyletic group, the moths, comprising the rest of the Lepidoptera, do not
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Coleophora Bifrondella
Coleophora bifrondella is a moth of the Coleophoridae family. It is found in Spain, France and Italy. The larvae feed on the leaves of Satureia montana. References[edit]^ Fauna EuropaeaWikimedia Commons has media related to Coleophora bifrondella.Wikispecies has information related to Coleophora bifrondellaTaxon identifiersWd: Q5143285 EoL: 952899 Fauna Europaea: 435707 GBIF: 5121603 LepIndex: 124362.0This article on a moth of the Coleophoridae family is a stub
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Georgian Cuisine
Georgian cuisine
Georgian cuisine
(Georgian: ქართული სამზარეულო; k’art’uli samzareulo) refers to the cooking styles and dishes created by Georgian people. The Georgian cuisine is unique to the country, but also carries some influences from other European and nearby Middle Eastern culinary traditions. Each historical province of Georgia has its own distinct culinary tradition, with variations such as Megrelian, Kakhetian, and Imeretian cuisines
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Perennial Plant
A perennial plant or simply perennial is a plant that lives more than two years.[1] The term (per- + -ennial, "through the years") is often used to differentiate a plant from shorter-lived annuals and biennials. The term is also widely used to distinguish plants with little or no woody growth from trees and shrubs, which are also technically perennials.[2] Perennials, especially small flowering plants, that grow and bloom over the spring and summer, die back every autumn and winter, and then return in the spring from their rootstock, are known as herbaceous perennials. However, depending on the rigors of local climate, a plant that is a perennial in its native habitat, or in a milder garden, may be treated by a gardener as an annual and planted out every year, from seed, from cuttings or from divisions
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Italian Cuisine
Italian cuisine
Italian cuisine
is food typical from Italy
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Acadian
 Canada: 96,145[1][2]  United States: 901,260 Quebec 32,950 New Brunswick 25,400 France 20,400 Nova Scotia 11,180 Ontario 8,745 Prince Edward Island 3,020 Maine 30,000 Louisiana 815,260 Texas 56,000Languages Acadian French
Acadian French
(a dialect of French with 370,000 speakers in Canada),[3] English, or both; some areas speak Chiac; those who have resettled to
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Fricot
Fricot is a traditional Acadian dish. The word fricot has its origins in 18th century France where it was used to mean a feast. The following century, it had evolved to mean "meat stew", and later still it became used to refer to prepared food. The main ingredients consist of potatoes, onions, and whatever meat was available, cooked in a stew and topped with dumplings. The common meats used were chicken (fricot au poulet), clams (fricot aux coques), rabbit (fricot au lapin des bois), beef, or pork. When chicken was used, it was traditionally an older chicken, since an egg-laying chicken would have been too precious to cook. This accounts for the long cooking time, as an older chicken would have had tougher meat. In lean times, a meatless fricot would be made. Fricot a la belette was one term for this, which means "weasel stew"
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Romanian People
  Romania
Romania
16,792,868 (2011 Romanian census)[4]   Moldova
Moldova
192,800 (2014 Moldovan census) (additional 2,423,328 Moldovans)[
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Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
(/ˌæzərbaɪˈdʒɑːn/ AZ-ər-by-JAHN; Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan [ɑzæɾbɑjˈd͡ʒɑn]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
(Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan Respublikası [ɑzæɾbɑjˈd͡ʒɑn ɾespublikɑˈsɯ]), is a country in the South Caucasus
Caucasus
region of Eurasia
Eurasia
at the crossroads of Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and Western Asia.[7] It is bound by the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
to the east, Russia
Russia
to the north, Georgia to the northwest, Armenia
Armenia
to the west and Iran
Iran
to the south
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