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Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
(/səˈskætʃəwən, sæ-, -ˌwɒn/ ( listen)) is a prairie and boreal province in western Canada, the only province without natural borders. It has an area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi), nearly 10 percent of which (59,366 square kilometres (22,900 sq mi)) is fresh water, composed mostly of rivers, reservoirs, and the province's 100,000 lakes. Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
is bordered on the west by Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, to the northeast by Nunavut, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana
Montana
and North Dakota. As of late 2017, Saskatchewan's population was estimated at 1,163,925.[7] Residents primarily live in the southern prairie half of the province, while the northern boreal half is mostly forested and sparsely populated
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ISO 3166-2
ISO 3166-2 is part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO), and defines codes for identifying the principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states) of all countries coded in ISO 3166-1. The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 2: Country subdivision
Country subdivision
code. It was first published in 1998. The purpose of ISO 3166-2 is to establish an international standard of short and unique alphanumeric codes to represent the relevant administrative divisions and dependent territories of all countries in a more convenient and less ambiguous form than their full names
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Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Universal Time
(abbreviated to UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude;[1] it does not observe daylight saving time
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Gross Domestic Product
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons
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Constitutional Monarchy
A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercise authority in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution.[1] Constitutional monarchy
Constitutional monarchy
differs from absolute monarchy (in which a monarch holds absolute power), in that constitutional monarchs are bound to exercise their powers and authorities within the limits prescribed within an established legal framework
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ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions.Contents1 Parts 2 Editions 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency3.1 Members4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParts[edit] It consists of three parts:[1]ISO 3166-1, Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Canadian Subnational Postal Abbreviations
Canadian provincial and territorial postal abbreviations are used by Canada Post
Canada Post
in a code system consisting of two capital letters, to represent the 13 provinces and territories on addressed mail. These abbreviations allow automated sorting. ISO 3166-2:CA identifiers' second elements are all the same as these; ISO adopted the existing Canada Post
Canada Post
abbreviations.[1] These abbreviations are not the source of letters in Canadian postal codes, which are assigned by Canada Post
Canada Post
on a different basis than these abbreviations. While postal codes are also used for sorting, they allow extensive regional sorting. In addition, several provinces have postal codes that begin with different letters. The codes replaced the inconsistent traditional system used by Canadians
Canadians
until the 1990s
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Canadian Postal Code
A Canadian postal code is a six-character string that forms part of a postal address in Canada.[1] Like British, Irish and Dutch postcodes, Canada's postal codes are alphanumeric. They are in the format A1A 1A1, where A is a letter and 1 is a digit, with a space separating the third and fourth characters. As of September 2014, there were 855,815 postal codes[2] using Forward Sortation Areas from A0A in Newfoundland to Y1A in Yukon. Canada
Canada
Post provides a free postal code look-up tool on its website,[3] via its mobile application,[4] and sells hard-copy directories and CD-ROMs
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Mountain Time Zone
The Mountain Time Zone
Mountain Time Zone
of North America
North America
keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC) when standard time is in effect, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time (UTC−6). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time at the 105th meridian west
105th meridian west
of the Greenwich Observatory. In the United States, the exact specification for the location of time zones and the dividing lines between zones is set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations at 49 CFR 71.[a] cor In the United States
United States
and Canada, this time zone is generically called Mountain Time (MT)
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Paper Birch
Betula
Betula
papyrifera (paper birch,[3] also known as white birch[3] and canoe birch[3]) is a short-lived species of birch native to northern North America. Paper
Paper
birch is named due to the thin white bark which often peels in paper like layers from the trunk. Paper
Paper
birch is often one of the first species to colonize a burned area within the northern latitudes and an important species for moose browse
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New Brunswick
New Brunswick
New Brunswick
(French: Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation: [nuvobʁɔnzwɪk] ( listen)) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada. The original inhabitants of the land were the Mi'kmaq, the Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy
Passamaquoddy
peoples. Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick
New Brunswick
was among the first places in North America
North America
to be explored and settled, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who eventually colonized most of the Maritimes and some of Maine
Maine
as the colony of Acadia. The area was caught up in the global conflict between the British and French empires, and in 1755 became part of Nova Scotia, to be partitioned off in 1784 following an influx of refugees from the American Revolutionary War. In 1785, Saint John became the first incorporated city in Canada
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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Ontario
Ontario
Ontario
(/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen); French: [ɔ̃taʁjo]) is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
and is located in east-central Canada.[7][8] It is Canada's most populous province[9] accounting for nearly 40 percent[10] of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area
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Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
(PEI or P.E.I.; French: Île-du-Prince-Édouard) is a province of Canada
Canada
consisting of the island of the same name, and several much smaller islands. Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
is one of the three Maritime Provinces
Maritime Provinces
and is the smallest province in both land area and population. It is part of the traditional lands of the Mi'kmaq, and became a British colony in the 1700s and was federated into Canada
Canada
as a province in 1873. Its capital is Charlottetown. According to the 2016 census, the province of Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island
has 142,907 residents. The backbone of the economy is farming; it produces 25% of Canada's potatoes
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