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Saraswat Brahmin
The Saraswats are a sub-group of Hindu
Hindu
Brahmins of India who trace their ancestry to the banks of the Sarasvati River. In Kalhana's Rajatarangini
Rajatarangini
(12th century CE), the Saraswats are mentioned as one of the five Pancha Gauda Brahmin
Brahmin
communities residing to the north of the Vindhyas.[1] They were spread over a wide area in northern part of the Indian subcontinent. One group lived in coastal Sindh
Sindh
and Gujarat,this group migrated to Bombay State
Bombay State
after the partition of India in 1947. One group was found in pre-partition Punjab and Kashmir most of these migrated away from Pakistan after 1947. Another branch, known as Goud Saraswat Brahmin, are now found along the western coast of India.[2] References[edit]^ D. Shyam Babu and Ravindra S. Khare, ed. (2011). Caste in Life: Experiencing Inequalities
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Hindu
Hindus
Hindus
(Hindustani: [ˈɦɪndu] (listen)) are persons who regard themselves as culturally, ethnically, or religiously adhering to aspects of Hinduism.[1][2] Historically, the term has also been used as a geographical, cultural, and later religious identifier for people living in the Indian subcontinent.[3][4] The historical meaning of the term Hindu has evolved with time. Starting with the Persian and Greek references to the land of the
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Dhangar
The Dhangar is a herding caste of people primarily located in the Indian state of Maharashtra.Contents1 Etymology 2 Current situation 3 Culture 4 Subdivisions4.1 Tribes5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "Dhangar" may be associated with a term for "cattle wealth" or be derived from the hills in which they lived (Sanskrit "dhang").[1] Ul Hassan noted that some people of his time believed the term to come from the Sanskrit "dhenugar" ("cattle herder") but dismissed that etymology as being "fictitious".[2] Current situation[edit] Traditionally being shepherds, cowherds, buffalo keepers, blanket and wool weavers, butchers and farmers, the Dhangars were late to take up modern-day education
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Maratha Clan System
The Maratha
Maratha
clan system (also referred to as Shahannava Kuli Marathas, 96 Kuli Marathas or 96K) refers to the network of families and essentially their surnames, within the Maratha
Maratha
culture of India. The Marathas primarily reside in the Indian state of Maharashtra, with smaller regional populations in other states.[1] Various lists have been compiled, purporting to list the 96 "true Maratha" clans, but these lists vary greatly and are disputed.[2][3] The list of ninety-six clans is divided into five ranked tiers, the highest of which contains the five primary Maratha
Maratha
clans.[4] See also[edit]List of Maratha
Maratha
dynasties and statesNotes[edit]^ " Maratha
Maratha
(people)". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 2009.  ^ Kathleen Kuiper, ed. (2010). The Culture of India. Rosen. p. 34
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Shett
Shett
Shett
(also spelt as Shet) (Konkani: शेट, Kannada: ಶೆಟ್ಟ) is a name given to the Daivajnas of Konkani origin residing on the west coast of India
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Brahmin
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Mahar
The Mahar
Mahar
(also known as Maha, Mehar, Taral, Dhegu Megu)[1] is an Indian community found largely in the state of Maharashtra, where they comprise 12% to 15% of the population, and neighbouring areas.[2] Most of the Mahar
Mahar
community followed B. R. Ambedkar
B. R. Ambedkar
in converting to Buddhism
Buddhism
in the middle of the 20th century.[3][4] As of 2017[update], the Mahar
Mahar
caste was designated as a Scheduled Caste
Scheduled Caste
in 16 Indian states.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-colonial period 1.2 British India2 Military role 3 Demographics 4 Religion4.1 Christianity 4.2 Buddhism5 Dalit literature 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit] The Mahars were considered an Untouchable community by the Hindu castes
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East Indians
East Indians, or East Indian Catholics, are an ethno-religious Indian Christian community who are members of the Catholic Church. They live primarily in the city of Mumbai, with smaller populations in portions of Palghar and Thane
Thane
districts in the Indian state of Maharashtra.[3][4]Contents1 History1.1 Pre-Portuguese era 1.2 Portuguese era 1.3 British and modern eras2 Architecture 3 Language and literature 4 Traditions and festivals 5 Dress 6 Cultural groups 7 Film industry 8 Singing competition 9 Notable East Indians 10 See also 11 Citations 12 ReferencesHistory[edit] Pre-Portuguese era[edit] According to tradition, Bartholomew the Apostle
Bartholomew the Apostle
visited India
India
and elsewhere during the first century AD. The Dominican friar Jordanus Catalani, who was Catalan or Occitan (southern French), began evangelizing in Sopara, Thana and north Konkan
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Tribe
A tribe is viewed developmentally, economically, and/or historically, as a social group existing outside of or before the development of states. A tribe is a group of distinct people, dependent on their land for their livelihood, who are largely self-sufficient, and not integrated into the national society. It is perhaps the term most readily understood and used by the general public to describe such communities
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Bhandari
Notable people bearing the name Bhandari include:Bidhya Devi Bhandari, Nepalese politician, President of Nepal Binod Bhandari (born 1990), Nepalese cricketer Damodar Bhandari, member of 2nd Nepalese Constituent Assembly Gagan Singh Bhandari, Nepalese politician and General Madan Bhandari, Nepalese politician and communist leader Rajendra Bhandari (born 1956), Nepalese poet Rajendra Bahadur Bhandari; Nepalese athlete Sabitra Bhandari, Nepalese nation
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Ethnic Group
An ethnic group or ethnicity is a category of people who identify with each other, usually on the basis of a presumed common genealogy or ancestry or on similarities such as common language or dialect, history, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is often used synonymously with the term nation, particularly in cases of ethnic nationalism, and is separate from but related to the concept of races. Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art or physical appearance. Ethnic groups often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Social Groups
In the social sciences, a social group has been defined as two or more people who interact with one another, share similar characteristics, and collectively have a sense of unity. Other theorists disagree however, and are wary of definitions which stress the importance of interdependence or objective similarity.[1][2] Instead, researchers within the social identity tradition generally define it as "a group is defined in terms of those who identify themselves as members of the group".[3] Regardless, social groups come in a myriad of sizes and varieties
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R. S. Khare
R. S. Khare
R. S. Khare
(born 1936 in Lakhimpur Kheri District, Uttar Pradesh, India) is a socio-cultural anthropologist and a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Virginia, U.S. He is known for studying “from within/without” India’s changing society, religions, food systems, and political cultures, and for following the trajectories of contemporary Indian traditional and modern cultural discourses. His anthropology has endeavored to widen reasoned bridges across the India-West cultural, religious-philosophical, and literary distinctions and differences.Contents1 Career 2 Contributions 3 Interdisciplinary studies at University of Virginia 4 International Commission on Anthropology of Food 5 Principal publications 6 Selected recent articles 7 References 8 External linksCareer[edit] He obtained his M.A. (1957) and Ph.D. (1962) in socio-cultural anthropology from Lucknow
Lucknow
University, India
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Vindhyas
The Vindhya Range
Vindhya Range
(pronounced [ʋɪnd̪ʱjə]) is a complex, discontinuous chain of mountain ridges, hill ranges, highlands and plateau escarpments in west-central India. Technically, the Vindhyas do not form a single mountain range in the geological sense. The exact extent of the Vindhyas is loosely defined, and historically, the term covered a number of distinct hill systems in central India, including the one that is now known as the Satpura Range. Today, the term principally refers to the escarpment that runs north of and roughly parallel to the Narmada River
Narmada River
in Madhya Pradesh, and its hilly extensions
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