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Sarah Monette
Sarah Monette
Sarah Monette
is an American novelist and short story author, writing mostly in the genres of fantasy and horror
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Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo
The Chicago
Chicago
Comic & Entertainment Expo (C2E2) is a Chicago
Chicago
fan convention dedicated to comics, pop cultu
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Kelly Link
Kelly Link (born 1969) is an American editor and author of short stories.[3] While some of her fiction falls more clearly within genre categories, many of her stories might be described as slipstream or magic realism: a combination of science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, and realism. Among other honors, she has won a Hugo award, three Nebula awards, and a World Fantasy
Fantasy
Award for her fiction.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards2.1 Books 2.2 Selected stories (award winners)3 As author 4 As editor 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Link is a graduate of Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York and the MFA program of UNC Greensboro. In 1995, she attended the Clarion East Writing Workshop. Link and husband Gavin Grant manage Small Beer Press, based in Northampton, Massachusetts. The couple's imprint of Small Beer Press for intermediate readers is called Big Mouth House. They also co-edited St
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Internet Speculative Fiction Database
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Fictitious Force
A fictitious force (also called a pseudo force,[1] d'Alembert force,[2][3] or inertial force[4][5]) is an apparent force that acts on all masses whose motion is described using a non-inertial frame of reference, such as a rotating reference frame. Examples are the forces that act on passengers in an accelerating or braking automobile, and the force that pushes objects toward the rim of a centrifuge. The fictitious force F is due to an object's inertia when the reference frame does not move inertially, and thus begins to accelerate relative to the free object. The fictitious force thus does not arise from any physical interaction between two objects (that is, it is not a "contact force"), but rather from the acceleration a of the non-inertial reference frame itself, which from the viewpoint of the frame now appears to be an acceleration of the object instead, requiring a "force" to make this happen
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Aeon
The word aeon /ˈiːɒn/, also spelled eon (in American English) and æon, originally meant "life", "vital force" or "being", "generation" or "a period of time", though it tended to be translated as "age" in the sense of "ages", "forever", "timeless" or "for eternity". It is a Latin
Latin
transliteration from the koine Greek word ὁ αἰών (ho aion), from the archaic αἰϝών (aiwon). In Homer
Homer
it typically refers to life or lifespan. Its latest meaning is more or less similar to the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word kalpa and Hebrew word olam. A cognate Latin
Latin
word aevum or aeuum (cf. αἰϝών) for "age" is present in words such as longevity and mediaeval.[1] Although the term aeon may be used in reference to a period of a billion years (especially in geology, cosmology or astronomy), its more common usage is for any long, indefinite, period
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Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet
Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet (LCRW) is a twice-yearly small press zine published by Small Beer Press, edited by Gavin Grant and Kelly Link. It contains an eclectic mix of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, with an emphasis on speculative fiction, fantasy or slipstream. Link, Karen Joy Fowler, and Ursula K. Le Guin
Ursula K. Le Guin
are among the most prominent of writers who have published in LCRW. The first issue was produced during the winter of 1996–1997 "in an edition of 26 copies or so" and reprinted next year when Link's story from it won the James Tiptree Jr. Award.[1] In November 2006, the 19th issue was published (marking 10 years). In August 2007, The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet (edited by Link and Grant, ISBN 0-345-49913-1) was published by Del Rey Books
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Tales Of The Unanticipated
Tales of the Unanticipated, known as TOTU, is a semiprozine that was founded under the auspices of the Minnesota Science Fiction Society (known as Mn-STF or Minn-STF),[1] and has since become independent. Like contemporaries such as Crank! and Century, Tales of the Unanticipated strove from its inception to showcase fiction, poetry and articles that are ostensibly speculative fiction.Contents1 History 2 Operations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The first issue of Tales of the Unanticipated was launched in August 1986
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Night Shade Books
Night Shade Books is an American, San Francisco-based imprint, formerly an independent publishing company, that specializes in science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Among its publications have been the U.S. edition of Iain M. Banks' novel The Algebraist, which was nominated for a Hugo Award, and Paolo Bacigalupi's novel The Windup Girl, which won several awards
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Ann VanderMeer
Ann VanderMeer
Ann VanderMeer
(née Kennedy) is an American publisher and editor, and the second female editor of the horror magazine Weird Tales. She is the founder of Buzzcity Press. Her work as Fiction Editor
Editor
of Weird Tales
Weird Tales
won a Hugo Award. Work from her press and related periodicals has won the British Fantasy Award, the International Rhysling Award, and appeared in several year's best anthologies. VanderMeer was also the founder of The Silver Web magazine, a periodical devoted to experimental and avant-garde fantasy literature. In 2009 Weird Tales, edited by VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal, won a Hugo Award
Hugo Award
for Best Semiprozine.[1][2] Though some of its individual contributors have been honored with Hugos, Nebula Awards, and even one Pulitzer Prize, the magazine itself had never before even been nominated for a Hugo
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Jeff VanderMeer
Jeff VanderMeer
Jeff VanderMeer
(born July 7, 1968) is an American author, editor, and literary critic. Initially associated with the New Weird literary genre, VanderMeer crossed over into mainstream success with his bestselling Southern Reach Trilogy. The trilogy's first novel, Annihilation, won the Nebula[1] and Shirley Jackson Awards,[2] and was adapted into a Hollywood film by director Alex Garland.[3] Among VanderMeer's other novels are Shriek: An Afterword and Borne
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Fantasy Magazine
Fantasy Magazine was an American online fantasy and science fiction magazine. It was launched as a print edition at the 2005 World Fantasy Convention in Madison, Wisconsin. It continued in this format for six more issues, but in mid-October 2007, it moved online, with daily content, and spun off an original anthology, titled Fantasy.[1] The magazine has published, in the past, stories by Peter S. Beagle, Jeffrey Ford, Theodora Goss, Caitlin Kiernan, Joe R. Lansdale, Nick Mamatas, Tim Pratt, Cat Rambo, Ekaterina Sedia, Catherynne M
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Northern Illinois University
Coordinates: 41°56′2″N 88°46′40″W / 41.93389°N 88.77778°W / 41.93389; -88.77778Northern Illinois
Illinois
UniversityFormer nameNorthern Illinois
Illinois
State Normal School (1895–1921) Northern Illinois
Illinois
State Teachers College
College
(1921–1955) Northern Illinois
Illinois
State College
College
(1955–1957)Type Public ResearchEstablished 1895Academic affiliationAPLU URAEndowment $74.7 million[1]President Lisa C
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.