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Santería
Santería, also known as Regla de Ochá, La Regla de Ifá,[1][2] or Lucumí, is an Afro-American religion
Afro-American religion
of Caribbean
Caribbean
origin that developed in the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
among West African descendants. Santería
Santería
is a Spanish word that means the "worship of saints". Santería
Santería
is influenced by and syncretized with Roman Catholicism
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Baptism
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Spanish Empire
The Spanish Empire
Empire
(Spanish: Imperio Español) was one of the largest empires in history. At the time, it was not known as that by the Spanish with the monarch ruling kingdoms in Spain, his possessions in Italy and northern Europe, and in the "Spanish Indies," its New World territories and the Philippines.[1] From the late fifteenth century to the early nineteenth, Spain's crown of Castile controlled a huge overseas territory in the New World.[2][3] The crown's main source of wealth was from gold and silver mined in Mexico
Mexico
and Peru. The empire reached the peak of its military, political and economic power under the Spanish Habsburgs,[4] through most of the 16th and 17th centuries, and its greatest territorial extent under the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
in the 18th century
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Yoruba Traditional Art
The Yoruba of West Africa
West Africa
(Benin, Nigeria
Nigeria
and Togo, with migrant communities in parts of Ghana, and Sierra Leone) are responsible for one of the finest artistic traditions in Africa, a tradition that remains vital and influential today.[1] Much of the art of the Yoruba, including staffs, court dress, and beadwork for crowns, is associated with the royal courts. The courts also commissioned numerous architectural objects such as veranda posts, gates, and doors that are embellished with carvings. Other Yoruba art
Yoruba art
is related shrines and masking traditions. The Yoruba worship a large pantheon of deities, and shrines dedicated to these gods are adorned with carvings and house and array of altar figures and other ritual paraphernalia
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Oyotunji
Coordinates: 32°36′34.51″N 80°48′10.24″W / 32.6095861°N 80.8028444°W / 32.6095861; -80.8028444 Oyotunji African Village is a village located near Sheldon, Beaufort County, South Carolina
South Carolina
that was founded by Oba Efuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I in 1970.[1][2] Oyotunji village is named after the Oyo empire, and the name literally means "Oyo returns" or "Oyo rises again".[1][3] Oyotunji village covers 27 acres (11 ha) and has a Yoruba temple which was moved from Harlem, New York
Harlem, New York
to its present location in 1960.[4][5][6] During the 1970s, the era of greatest population growth at the village, the number of inhabitants grew from 5 to between 200 and 250. (Goldstein, Hunt, and McCray) The population is rumored to fluctuate between 5 and 9 families as of the last 10 years
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New World
The New World
World
is one of the names used for the majority of Earth's Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas
Americas
(including nearby islands such as those of the Caribbean and Bermuda). The term originated in the early 16th century after Europeans made landfall in what would later be called the Americas
Americas
in the age of discovery, expanding the geographical horizon of classical geographers, who had thought of the world as consisting of Africa, Europe, and Asia, collectively now referred to as the Old World (a.k.a
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Santeria (album)
Santeria is a collaborative studio album by Italian rappers Marracash and Guè Pequeno, released on June 24, 2016, by Universal Music Group. As longtime friends, before the album, they recorded some underground mixtapes and works, and after that they had collaborated on their respective albums on some songs.Contents1 Background 2 Music and production 3 Lyrics and themes 4 Track listing 5 Charts and certifications5.1 Charts6 ReferencesBackground[edit] On January 4, 2016, through social networks, the two rappers have revealed their intention to make an album together;[1] in the past, Marracash and Guè Pequeno have worked together on various songs, including Fattore wow (in the album Marracash 2008), Big! and Brivido (present respectively in the albums Il ragazzo d'oro and Bravo ragazzo by Pequeno).[2] The album was recorded in Tenerife, Trancoso and Milan.[3] The on June 7, the two rappers revealed the cover of the album, made by the Colombian visual a
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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Babalawo
Babaaláwo or Babalawo
Babalawo
(Babalao or Babalaô in Latin America; literally meaning 'father of the mysteries' in the Yoruba language) is a spiritual title that denotes a priest of the Ifá
Ifá
oracle. Ifá
Ifá
is a divination system that represents the teachings of the Orisha Orunmila, the Orisha of Wisdom, who in turn serves as the oracular representative of Olodumare. A Babalawo's female counterpart is known as an Iyanifa.Contents1 Functions in society 2 Training 3 See also 4 External linksFunctions in society[edit] The Babalawos ascertain the future of their clients through communication with Ifá
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Egungun
Egungun, in the broadest sense of the word, refers to all types of Yoruba masquerades or masked, costumed figures.[1] When used in its more specific, common sense, "Egungun" refers to the Yoruba masquerades connected with ancestor reverence, or to the ancestors themselves as a collective force. The singular form, for an individual ancestor, is Egun.Contents1 Classification of Egungun
Egungun
types 2 Egungun
Egungun
ensembles 3 References 4 Further reading4.1 Film & Video5 External linksClassification of Egungun
Egungun
types[edit]The classification of Egun or Egungun
Egungun
types, which might appear to be a fairly straightforward task, is in fact an extremely complex problem involving the comprehension of indigenous taxonomies
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Gelede
The Gẹlẹdẹ
Gẹlẹdẹ
spectacle of the Yoruba is a public display by colorful masks which combines art and ritual dance to amuse, educate and inspire worship.[1] Gelede
Gelede
celebrates “Mothers” (awon iya wa), a group that includes female ancestors and deities as well as the elderly women of the community, and the power and spiritual capacity these women have in society
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Ogboni
Ogboni (also known as Osugbo in Ijèbú) is a fraternal institution indigenous to the Yoruba language-speaking polities of Nigeria, Republic of Bénin
Republic of Bénin
and Togo, as well as among the Edo people. A similar group in Igbo-speaking areas is called Nze na Ozo. The society performs a range of political and religious functions, including exercising a profound influence on monarchs and serving as high courts of jurisprudence in capital offenses. Its members are generally considered to constitute the nobility of the various Yoruba kingdoms of West Africa. The Iwarefa[edit] Each Ogboni lodge is led by a group of six principal officers that are collectively known as the Iwarefa ( lit. "The Six Wise Men")
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Yoruba Medicine
Yorùbá medicine, or egbogi, is an African system of herbalism and phytotherapy practised primarily in West Africa
West Africa
and the Caribbean."African herbal medicine is commonly called Yorubic or Orisha medicine on the African continent. It started from a religious text, called Ifa Corpus. According to tradition, the Ifa Corpus was revealed by the mystic prophet, Orunmilla, around 4,000 years ago in the ancient city of Ile-Ife, now known as major city in Yorùbáland
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Oshunmare
Oshunmare (known as Ochumaré or Oxumaré in Latin America) is an Orisha.[1][2] Osumare is the spirit of the rainbow, and Osumare also means rainbow in the Yoruba Language See also[edit]Aido WedoReferences[edit]Our mommy's, are wrong them, our texts: manifestations of merica literature by Teresa N. Washington Nickels in the Nation Sack: Continuity in Africana Spiritual Technologies by Teresa N. Washington^ Allen F. Roberts (April 1992). "Chance Encounters, Ironic Collage". African Arts. 25 (2): 54–63, 97–98. doi:10.2307/3337060. JSTOR 3337060.  ^ Paul Carter Harrison, Gus Edwards (2002). Black theatre: ritual performance in the African diaspora. Temple University Press. p. 418. ISBN 978-1566399449
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Ori (Yoruba)
Ori (known as Orí in Latin America) is an Orisha and metaphysical concept. Ori, literally meaning "head," refers to one's spiritual intuition and destiny. It is the reflective spark of human consciousness embedded into the human essence, and therefore is often personified as an Orisha in its own right. It is believed[who?] that human beings are able to heal themselves both spiritually and physically by working with the Orishas to achieve a balanced character, or iwa-pele. When one has a balanced character, one obtains an alignment with one's Ori or divine self. It is also believed that Ori be worshiped like Orisha. When things are not going right, Ori should be consulted. And to make things right Ori should be appeased. This is because whatever one becomes or whatever happens in one's life is as destined by Ori. Further reading[edit]Fagbemijo Amosun Fakayode.,"Ori Mi Gbe Mi: Ori Support Me", 2012Bibliography[edit]Camara, Louis, 1996
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Yoruba People
Contemporary:Apala Fuji Were Yoruba Highlife Waka Jùjú Afrobeat SakaraFolk/Traditional:Ehin Ogbe Bolojo Obitun Biripo Bata Olele Ijala Gelede Ekun Iyawo/Rara Dadakuada Oriki Esa Alamo Gbedu Iremoje EwiNotable PersonalitiesList of Yoruba peopleReligionGod Olorun Olodumare OlofiDivination Ifá Opon Ifá Opele Odù IfáOrishas Obatala Osanyin Elegba Yemoja Olokun Shango Oya/Yansa Ogun Babalú-Ayé Oshun Oshosi Orunmila Aganju More....DiasporaOkus Bahians Saros Akus Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
Creoles Taboms, Agudas
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