HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sanctus
The Sanctus
Sanctus
(Latin: Sanctus, "Holy") is a hymn in Christian liturgy. It may also be called the epinikios hymnos (Greek: ἐπινίκιος ὕμνος, " Hymn
Hymn
of Victory") when referring to the Greek rendition. In Western Christianity, the Sanctus
Sanctus
forms part of the Ordinary and is sung (or said) as the final words of the Preface of the Eucharistic Prayer, the prayer of consecration of the bread and wine. The preface, which alters according to the season, usually concludes with words describing the praise of the worshippers joining with the angels, who are pictured as praising God with the words of the Sanctus
[...More...]

"Sanctus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Isaiah
The Book
Book
of Isaiah
Isaiah
(Hebrew: ספר ישעיהו‬, IPA: [sɛ.fɛr jə.ʃaʕ.ˈjɑː.hu]) is the first of the Latter Prophets in the He
[...More...]

"Book Of Isaiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Byzantine Rite
The Byzantine Rite, also known as the Greek Rite or Constantinopolitan Rite, is the liturgical rite used by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
as well as by certain Eastern Catholic Churches; also, parts of it are employed by, as detailed below, other denominations. Its development began during the fourth century in Constantinople
Constantinople
and it is now the second most-used ecclesiastical rite in Christendom
Christendom
after the Roman Rite. The Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
was originally developed and used in Greek language and later, with introduction of Eastern Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
to other ethnic groups it was translated into local languages and continued further development. Historically, most important non-Greek variants of Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
are: Byzantine-Slavonic and Byzantine-Georgian
[...More...]

"Byzantine Rite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isaiah
Isaiah
Isaiah
was the 8th-century BC Jewish prophet for whom the Book of Isaiah
Isaiah
is named.[3][4] Within the text of the Book of Isaiah, Isaiah
Isaiah
himself is referred to as "the prophet",[5] but the exact relationship between the Book of Isaiah
Isaiah
and any such historical Isaiah
Isaiah
is complicated. The traditional view is that all 66 chapters of the book of Isaiah
Isaiah
were written by one man, Isaiah, possibly in two periods between 740 BCE and c. 686 BCE, separated by approximately 15 years, and includes dramatic prophetic declarations of Cyrus the Great in the Bible, acting to restore the nation of Israel
Israel
from Babylonian captivity
[...More...]

"Isaiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theodore Of Mopsuestia
Theodore the Interpreter (c. 350 – 428) was bishop of Mopsuestia (as Theodore II) from 392 to 428 AD. He is also known as Theodore of Antioch, from the place of his birth and presbyterate. He is the best known representative of the middle School of Antioch
Antioch
of hermeneutics.Contents1 Life and work 2 Posthumous legacy 3 Literary remains 4 Sources 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife and work[edit] Theodore was born at Antioch, where his father held an official position and the family was wealthy (Chrysostom, ad Th. Laps. ii). Theodore's cousin, Paeanius, to whom several of John Chrysostom's letters are addressed, held an important post of civil government; his brother Polychronius became bishop of the metropolitan see of Apamea. Theodore first appears as the early companion and friend of Chrysostom, his fellow-townsman, his equal in rank, and but two or three years his senior in age
[...More...]

"Theodore Of Mopsuestia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Epistle Of Clement
The First Epistle
Epistle
of Clement (Ancient Greek: Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους, translit. Klēmentos pros Korinthious, lit. 'Clement to Corinthians') is a letter addressed to the Christians in the city of Corinth. The letter was composed at some time between AD 70 and AD 140, and ranks with Didache
Didache
as one of the earliest—if not the earliest—of extant Christian documents outside the canonical New Testament. As the name suggests, a Second Epistle
Epistle
of Clement is known, but this is a later work by a different author
[...More...]

"First Epistle Of Clement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Apocalypse Of John
The Book of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book of the New Testament that occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation" (before title pages and titles, books were commonly known by their first words, as is also the case of the Hebrew Five Books of Moses (Torah)). The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament canon (although there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles).[a] The author names himself in the text as "John", but his precise identity remains a point of academic debate
[...More...]

"Apocalypse Of John" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
Christianity
consists of four main church families: the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Eastern Catholic churches
Eastern Catholic churches
(that are in communion with Rome but still maintain Eastern liturgies). The term is used in contrast with Western Christianity
Christianity
(namely the Latin Church and Protestantism). Eastern Christianity
Christianity
consists of the Christian traditions and churches that developed in the Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, Southern India
Southern India
and parts of the Far East over several centuries. The term does not describe a single communion or religious denomination. Some Eastern churches have more in common historically and theologically with Western Christianity
Christianity
than with one another
[...More...]

"Eastern Christianity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christological
Christology
Christology
(from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology
Christian theology
which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.[2][3][4] Primary considerations include the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
in conjunction with His relationship with that of God the Father. As such, Christology
Christology
is concerned with the details of Jesus' ministry, his acts and teachings, to arrive at a clearer understanding of who he is in his person, and his role in salvation.[5] The views of Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
provided a major component of the Christology
Christology
of the Apostolic Age
[...More...]

"Christological" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

School Of Antioch
The School of Antioch was one of the two major centers of the study of biblical exegesis and theology during Late Antiquity; the other was the Catechetical School of Alexandria. This group was known by this name because the advocates of this tradition were based in the city of Antioch, one of the major cities of the ancient Roman Empire. While the Christian intellectuals of Alexandria emphasized the allegorical interpretation of Scriptures and tended toward a Christology
Christology
that emphasized the union of the human and the divine, those in Antioch held to a more literal and occasionally typological exegesis and a Christology
Christology
that emphasized the distinction between the human and the divine in the person of Jesus Christ
[...More...]

"School Of Antioch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catechetical School Of Alexandria
The Catechetical School of Alexandria
Alexandria
was a school of Christian theologians and priests in Alexandria.[1] The teachers and students of the school (also known as the Didascalium) were influential in many of the early theological controversies of the Christian church. It was one of the two major centers of the study of biblical exegesis and theology during Late Antiquity, the other being the School of Antioch. According to Jerome
Jerome
the Alexandrian school was founded by Mark the Apostle. The earliest recorded dean was supposedly Athenagoras (176).[citation needed] He was succeeded by Pantaenus
Pantaenus
181, who was succeeded as head of the school by his student Clement of Alexandria in 190.[2] Other notable theologians with a connection to the school include Origen, Gregory Thaumaturgus, Heraclas, Dionysius "the Great", and Didymus the Blind
[...More...]

"Catechetical School Of Alexandria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Assyrian Church Of The East
The Assyrian Church of the East
Church of the East
(Classical Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܕܡܕܢܚܐ ܕܐܬܘܖ̈ܝܐ‎ ʻĒdtā d-Madenḥā d-Ātorāyē), officially the Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East[3] (ʻEdtā Qaddīštā wa-Šlīḥāitā Qātolīqī d-Madenḥā d-Ātorāyē), is an Eastern Christian
Eastern Christian
Church that follows the traditional christology and ecclesiology of the historical Church of the East.[4] It belongs to the eastern branch of Syriac Christianity, and uses the East Syrian Rite
East Syrian Rite
in its liturgy. Its main spoken language is Syriac, a dialect of Eastern Aramaic, and the majority of its adherents are ethnic Assyrians. It is officially headquartered in the city of Erbil
Erbil
in northern Iraq, and its original area also spreads into south-eastern Turkey
Turkey
and north-western Iran, corresponding to ancient Assyria
[...More...]

"Assyrian Church Of The East" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Merbecke
John Marbeck, Merbeck or Merbecke (c. 1510 – c. 1585) was an English theological writer and musician who produced a standard setting of the Anglican liturgy. He is also known today for his setting of the Mass, Missa Per arma justitiae.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Liturgical Recognition and Notice 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Probably a native of Beverley in Yorkshire, Merbecke appears to have been a boy chorister at St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and was employed as an organist there from about 1541. Two years later he was convicted with four others of heresy and sentenced to be burnt at the stake, but received a pardon owing to the intervention of Stephen Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester.[1] An English Concordance of the Bible which Merbecke had been preparing at the suggestion of Richard Turner, was however confiscated and destroyed
[...More...]

"John Merbecke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

First Prayer Book Of Edward VI
The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by the Continuing Anglican, Anglican realignment and other Anglican Christian churches. The original book, published in 1549 in the reign of Edward VI, was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome. Prayer books, unlike books of prayers, contain the words of structured (or liturgical) services of worship. The work of 1549 was the first prayer book to include the complete forms of service for daily and Sunday worship in English. It contained Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, the Litany, and Holy Communion and also the occasional services in full: the orders for Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, "prayers to be said with the sick", and a funeral service
[...More...]

"First Prayer Book Of Edward VI" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liturgy Of St. James
Liturgy
Liturgy
is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions. As a religious phenomenon, liturgy is a communal response to and participation in, the sacred through activity reflecting praise, thanksgiving, supplication or repentance. Ritualization may be associated with life events such as birth, coming of age, marriage, sex and death. It thus forms the basis for establishing a relationship with a divine agency, as well as with other participants in the liturgy. Methods of dress, preparation of food, application of cosmetics or other hygienic practices are all considered liturgical activities. Technically speaking, liturgy is a subset of ritual. When ritual is undertaken to participate in a divine act or assist a divine action, it is liturgy. If the ritual does not have this purpose it is not liturgy but only ritual
[...More...]

"Liturgy Of St. James" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Divine Liturgy Of St. John Chrysostom
3 The Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
of Saint John Chrysostom
John Chrysostom
is the most celebrated divine liturgy (or "mass") in the Byzantine Rite. It is named after its core part, the anaphora attributed to Saint John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople
Archbishop of Constantinople
in the 5th century. It reflects the work of the Cappadocian Fathers
Cappadocian Fathers
to both combat heresy and define Trinitarian theology
Trinitarian theology
for the Christian Church. This liturgy was probably used originally by the School of Antioch (John having been a deacon and priest in Antioch) and, therefore, most likely developed from West Syriac liturgical rites. In Constantinople, it was refined and beautified under John's guidance as Archbishop (398–404)
[...More...]

"Divine Liturgy Of St. John Chrysostom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.