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San Sebastián Chess Tournament
There were two important chess tournaments in San Sebastián, Spain, in 1911 and 1912. San Sebastián
San Sebastián
1911[edit] The tournament was held from February 20 to March 17, 1911.[1] The event was organized by Jacques Mieses, who insisted that all of the expenses of the masters were paid.# Player 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Total1  José Raúl Capablanca (Cuba) * 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 9½2  Akiba Rubinstein (Russian Empire)/ Poland 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 93  Milan Vidmar (Aust
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Oldřich Duras
Oldřich Duras (also Důras; 30 October 1882, Pchery, Bohemia, then Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
– 5 January 1957, Prague, then Czechoslovakia) was a leading Czech chess master of the early 20th century. FIDE
FIDE
awarded him the title of International Grandmaster
International Grandmaster
in 1950, when the title was first introduced, in recognition of his achievements in the early twentieth century. Among his noted tournament wins (all shared) are Bremen (1905), Prague (1908), Vienna (1908) and Breslau (1912). He had plus scores against Richard Teichmann
Richard Teichmann
(+6-2=6), David Janowski
David Janowski
(+3-1=0), Carl Schlechter (+2-1=11) and Aron Nimzowitsch (+3-2=3), and level scores with Siegbert Tarrasch
Siegbert Tarrasch
and Géza Maróczy
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Rudolf Spielmann
Rudolf Spielmann
Rudolf Spielmann
(5 May 1883 – 20 August 1942) was an Austrian-Jewish[1] chess player of the romantic school, and chess writer.Contents1 Career 2 Results versus Capablanca 3 Quotes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksCareer[edit] Spielmann was a lawyer but never worked as one. He was born in 1883, the second child of Moritz and Cecilia Spielmann, and had an older brother, Leopold, and two sisters, Jenni and Irma. Moritz Spielmann was a newspaper editor in Vienna
Vienna
and enjoyed playing chess in his spare time. He introduced Leopold and Rudolf to the game, and the latter quickly began to develop an aptitude for it. Spielmann was devoted to his nieces and nephews, although he never married or had children of his own
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Round-robin Tournament
A round-robin, tournament (or all-play-all tournament) is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn.[1][2] It contrasts with an elimination tournament.Contents1 Terminology 2 Use 3 Evaluation 4 Scheduling algorithm4.1 Original construction of pairing tables by Richard Schurig (1886)5 See also 6 External links 7 ReferencesTerminology[edit] The term round-robin is derived from the French term ruban, meaning "ribbon". Over a long period of time, the term was corrupted and idiomized to robin.[3][4] In a single round-robin schedule, each participant plays every other participant once. If each participant plays all others twice, this is frequently called a double round-robin
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FIDE World Rankings
The Fédération Internationale des Échecs (FIDE) is the organization that governs international chess competition. Each month, FIDE publishes the lists "Top 100 Players", "Top 100 Women", "Top 100 Juniors" and "Top 100 Girls", as well as rankings of countries according to the average rating of their top 10 players and top 10 female players
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Swiss-system Tournament
A Swiss-system tournament is a non-eliminating tournament format which features a set number of rounds of competition, but considerably fewer than in a round-robin tournament. In a Swiss tournament, each competitor (team or individual) does not play every other. Competitors meet one-to-one in each round and are paired using a set of rules designed to ensure that each competitor plays opponents with a similar running score, but not the same opponent more than once
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Leó Forgács
Leó Forgács
Leó Forgács
(né Léo Fleischmann) (5 October 1881 in Budapest
Budapest
– 17 August 1930 in Berettyóújfalu, Hungary) was a Hungarian chess player.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Notable chess games 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Fleischmann began his international career at Hanover 1902 where he won Haupturnier B in the 13th DSB Congress. In 1904, he took 6th place at the “Rice Gambit” tournament, in the Monte Carlo chess tournament. In the same year, he took 10th in Coburg (14th DSB Congress). The event was won by Curt von Bardeleben, Carl Schlechter and Rudolf Swiderski. In 1905, he won in Barmen (B-tournament). In 1905, he took 5th in Vienna. The event was won by Schlechter. In 1906, he tied for 3rd–4th in Nuremberg (15th DSB Congress, Frank Marshall won). He took 5th in the Ostend 1907 chess tournament (Masters' Tournament)
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Julius Perlis
Julius Perlis
Julius Perlis
(19 January 1880, in Białystok
Białystok
(Poland, then Russian Empire) – 11 September 1913, in Ennstal) was an Austrian chess player. Biography[edit] At the beginning of his career, Perlis played in Vienna, winning in 1901. Then, in 1902 he took 3rd (Quadrangular), took 2nd, behind Mikhail Chigorin
Mikhail Chigorin
in 1903, and won in 1904. The same year, he took 3rd in Vienna (Gambit tournament). The event was won by Carl Schlechter. In 1905, he tied for 4-6th in Barmen
Barmen
(Masters B). In 1906, he took 9th in Ostend
Ostend
(Schlechter won). In 1906, he took 3rd in Vienna. In 1907, he tied for 7-8th in Vienna ( Jacques Mieses
Jacques Mieses
won). In 1907, he took 16th in Ostend
Ostend
(Masters B). In 1908, he tied for 7-8th in Vienna (Trebitsch tournament). In 1909, he took 7th in Sankt Petersburg
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Albert Salomon Von Rothschild
Georg Anselm Alphonse (1877–1934) Alphonse Meyer de Rothschild (1878–1942) Charlotte Esther von Rothschild (1879–1885) Ludwig Nathaniel (1882–1955) Eugène Daniel von Rothschild (1884-1976) Valentine Noémi von Rothschild (1886-1969) Oskar von Rothschild (1888–1909)Parent(s) Anselm von Rothschild
Anselm von Rothschild
(1803–1874) and Charlotte von Rothschild (1807–1859)HonorsIron Cross of Merit (1893) 719 Albert (1911)Albert Salomon Anselm Freiherr von Rothschild (October 29, 1844 – February 11, 1911) was a banker in Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
and a member of the Rothschild banking family of Austria
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Paul Saladin Leonhardt
Paul Saladin Leonhardt
Paul Saladin Leonhardt
(13 November 1877 – 14 December 1934) was a German chess master. He was born in Posen, Province of Posen, German Empire (now Poland), and died of a heart attack in Königsberg
Königsberg
during a game of chess. A player with a low profile and not many tournament wins, Leonhardt has been largely forgotten by the history books. However, at his best, he was able to defeat most of the elite players of the period. Tarrasch, Tartakower, Nimzowitsch, Maróczy and Réti all succumbed to his fierce attacking style between 1903 and 1920
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Czech Republic
The Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(/ˈtʃɛk rɪˈpʌblɪk/ ( listen)[10] Czech: Česká republika, Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛskaː ˈrɛpuˌblɪka] ( listen)),[11] also known as Czechia[12] (/ˈtʃɛkiə/ ( listen); Czech: Česko, pronounced [ˈtʃɛsko] ( listen)), is a landlocked country in Central Europe
Europe
bordered by Germany
Germany
to the west, Austria
Austria
to the south, Slovakia to the east and Poland
Poland
to the northeast.[13] The Czech Republic
Czech Republic
covers an area of 78,866 square kilometres (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental climate and oceanic climate. It is a unitary parliamentary republic, has 10.6 million inhabitants and the capital and largest city is Prague, with 1.3 million residents
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San Sebastián
San Sebastián
San Sebastián
(Spanish: [san seβasˈtjan]) or Donostia (Basque: [doˈnos̺tia])[3] is a coastal city and municipality located in the Basque Autonomous Community, Spain. It lies on the coast of the Bay of Biscay, 20 km (12 miles) from the French border. The capital city of Gipuzkoa, the municipality's population is 186,095 as of 2015,[4] with its metropolitan area reaching 436,500 in 2010.[5] Locals call themselves donostiarra (singular), both in Spanish[6] and Basque. The main economic activities are commerce and tourism, and it is one of the most famous tourist destinations in Spain.[7] Despite the city’s small size, events such as the San Sebastián
San Sebastián
International Film Festival have given it an international dimension
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Amos Burn
Amos Burn
Amos Burn
(1848–1925) was an English chess player, one of the world's leading players at the end of the 19th century, and a chess writer. Burn was born on New Year's Eve, 1848, in Hull.[1] As a teenager, he moved to Liverpool, becoming apprenticed to a firm of shipowners and merchants.[1] He learned chess only at the relatively late age of 16.[1] He later took chess lessons from future World Champion Wilhelm Steinitz in London, and, like his teacher, became known for his superior defensive ability.[2] Aron Nimzowitsch, in his book The Praxis of My System, named Burn one of the world's six greatest defensive players.[2] Although never a professional chess player, Burn had a long tournament and writing career. In 1913, Leopold Hoffer, the editor for over 30 years of the chess column in The Field, the leading chess column in Great Britain, died. The proprietors of The Field took seven weeks to select a successor, finally settling on Burn
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Dawid Janowski
Dawid Markelowicz Janowski [ˈd̪avʲit̪ ˈmaʁkəlɔvit͡ʂ ˈjanɔfski] (25 May 1868 – 15 January 1927; often spelled David) was a leading Polish chess master and subsequent French citizen.Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born into a Polish family in Wołkowysk, Russian Empire
Russian Empire
(now Belarus), he settled in Paris around 1890 and began his professional chess career in 1894. He won tournaments in Monte Carlo 1901, Hanover
Hanover
1902 and tied for first at Vienna
Vienna
1902 and Barmen
Barmen
1905. In 1915 he left Europe for the United States and spent the next nine years there before returning to Paris. Janowski was devastating against the older masters such as Wilhelm Steinitz (+5−2), Mikhail Chigorin
Mikhail Chigorin
(+17−4=4) and Joseph Henry Blackburne (+6−2=2)
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Hungary
Coordinates: 47°N 20°E / 47°N 20°E / 47; 20Hungary Magyarország  (Hungarian)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himnusz" (Hungarian)[1] "Hymn"Location of  Hungary  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Budapest 47°26′N 19°15′E / 47.433°N 19.250°E / 47.433; 19.250Official language and national language Hungarian[2]Ethnic groups (2011)80.7% Hungarians 14.7% not declared 3.1% Roma 1.3% Germans[3]Religion52.9% Christianity –38.9% Catholicism –13.7% Protestantism –0.1% Orthodox Church 0.1% Judaism 1.7% other 18.2% not religious 27.2% unanswered[4]Demonym HungarianGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentJános Áder• Prime MinisterViktor O
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