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San Francisco Mime Troupe
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Mime Troupe is a theatre of political satire which performs free shows in various parks in the San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area and around California. The Troupe does not, however, perform silent mime, but each year creates an original musical comedy that combines aspects of Commedia dell'Arte, melodrama, and broad farce with topical political themes. The group was awarded the Regional Theatre Award at the 41st Tony Awards.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Post-Davis history2 Productions 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The group was founded in 1959 by R. G. Davis as a medium of expression of his divergent[citation needed] theatrical concepts
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Political Satire
Political satire is satire that specializes in gaining entertainment from politics; it has also been used with subversive intent where political speech and dissent are forbidden by a regime, as a method of advancing political arguments where such arguments are expressly forbidden. Political satire is usually distinguished from political protest or political dissent, as it does not necessarily carry an agenda nor seek to influence the political process. While occasionally it may, it more commonly aims simply to provide entertainment
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Wally Hedrick
Wally Bill Hedrick (1928 in Pasadena, California
Pasadena, California
– December 17, 2003 in Bodega Bay, California)[1] was a seminal American artist in the 1950s California
California
counterculture,[2] gallerist, and educator who came to prominence in the early 1960s. Hedrick’s contributions to art include pioneering artworks in psychedelic light art, mechanical kinetic sculpture, junk/assemblage sculpture, Pop Art, and (California) Funk Art. Later in his life, he was a recognized forerunner in Happenings, Conceptual Art, Bad Painting, Neo-Expressionism, and image appropriation. Hedrick was also a key figure in the first important public manifestation of the Beat Generation when he helped to organize the Six Gallery Reading, and created the first artistic denunciation of American foreign policy in Vietnam
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Labor Day
Labor Day
Labor Day
in the United States
United States
is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day
Labor Day
Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer in the United States. It is recognized as a federal holiday. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. "Labor Day" was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon
Oregon
was the first state of the United States
United States
to make it an official public holiday
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Arthur Holden
Arthur Holden (born August 28, 1959) is a Canadian actor and writer. Best known as a voice actor, with roles including Mr. Ratburn in Arthur, Baba-Miao in Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat, Mayor Mallard in The Little Twins, and Mr. Larkin from What's With Andy?, he has also had roles in film, television and theatre, and has written for stage, film and television. Ars Poetica is a play that Holden wrote.[1] His father was politician Richard Holden
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Nina Serrano
Nina Serrano (born 1934) is an American poet, writer, storyteller, and independent media producer who lives in Oakland, California. She is the author of Heartsongs: The Collected Poems of Nina Serrano (1980) and Pass it on!: How to start your own senior storytelling program in the schools (Stagebridge). Her poems are widely anthologized, including the literary anthology, Under the Fifth Sun: Latino Writers from California (Heyday Books), and three anthologies of peace poems edited by Mary Rudge from Estuary Press. She translated two chap books from Peruvian poet Adrian Arias
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Steve Reich
Stephen Michael Reich (/raɪʃ/[1][2] born October 3, 1936) is an American composer who, along with La Monte Young, Terry Riley, and Philip Glass, pioneered minimal music in the mid to late 1960s.[3][4][5] Reich's style of composition influenced many composers and groups. His innovations include using tape loops to create phasing patterns (for example, his early compositions It's Gonna Rain and Come Out), and the use of simple, audible processes to explore musical concepts (for instance, Pendulum Music and Four Organs). These compositions, marked by their use of repetitive figures, slow harmonic rhythm and canons, have significantly influenced contemporary music, especially in the US
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Turandot (Brecht)
Turandot
Turandot
or the Whitewashers' Congress is an epic comedy by the German modernist playwright Bertolt Brecht
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William T. Wiley
William T. Wiley
William T. Wiley
(born October 21, 1937)[1] is an American artist. His practice spans a broad range of media including drawing, painting, sculpture, film, performance, and pinball. At least some of Wiley's work has been referred to as funk art.[2]Contents1 Life and work 2 Collections[13] 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife and work[edit] He was born in Bedford, Indiana. Raised in Indiana, Texas, and Richland, Washington, Wiley moved to San Francisco
San Francisco
to study at the California School of Fine Arts
California School of Fine Arts
where he earned his BFA in 1960 and his MFA two years later.[3] In 1963, Wiley joined the faculty of the UC Davis art department with Bay Area Funk Movement artists Robert Arneson and Roy DeForest
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Victoria Hochberg
Victoria Greene Hochberg is an American film, television director and writer. She directed episodes of Doogie Howser, M.D., The Trials of Rosie O'Neill, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Touched by an Angel, Models Inc., Melrose Place, Central Park West, Ally McBeal, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show, Sex and the City, Cold Feet, Tucker, The Chris Isaak Show, State of Grace, Kitchen Confidential, Ghost Whisperer, Notes from the Underbelly
Notes from the Underbelly
and Reaper. As well as writing I Married a Centerfold[2] and four episodes of the series Me & Mrs
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Emmett Grogan
Emmett Grogan (born Eugene Grogan, November 28, 1942 – April 6, 1978) was a founder of the Diggers, a radical community-action group of Improvisational actors in the Haight-Ashbury
Haight-Ashbury
district of San Francisco, California. The Diggers
Diggers
took their name from the English Diggers
Diggers
(1649–1650), a radical movement opposed to feudalism, the Church of England
Church of England
and the British Crown.Contents1 Biography 2 Criticism of counterculture 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit] The San Francisco
San Francisco
Diggers
Diggers
were a legendary group that evolved out of two radical traditions that thrived in the Bay Area
Bay Area
in the mid-1960s: the bohemian/underground art/theater scene, and the New Left/civil rights/peace movement
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The Miser
The Miser
Miser
(French: L'Avare; pronounced [lavaʁ]) is a five-act comedy in prose by the French playwright Molière. It was first performed on September 9, 1668, in the theatre of the Palais-Royal in Paris.[1]Contents1 The play 2 Roles 3 Synopsis 4 Sources 5 Theatrical adaptations 6 Film and television adaptations 7 Notes 8 References 9 Works cited 10 External linksThe play[edit] The play was first produced when Molière's company was under the protection of Louis XIV himself. It was loosely based on the Latin comedy Aulularia by Plautus, from which many incidents and scraps of dialogue are borrowed, as well as from contemporary Italian farces.[2][3] The miser of the title is called Harpagon, a name adapted from the Latin
Latin
harpago, meaning a hook or grappling iron. He is obsessed with the wealth he has amassed and always ready to save expenses. Now a widower, he has a son, Cléante, and a daughter, Élise
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The Exception And The Rule
The Exception and the Rule (in German Die Ausnahme und die Regel) is a short play by German playwright Bertolt Brecht
Bertolt Brecht
and is one of several Lehrstücke (Teaching plays) he wrote around 1929/30. The objective of Brecht's Lehrstücke was that they be taken on tour and performed in schools or in factories to educate the masses about socialist politics. The play itself is short, and lasts no longer than 60 minutes if performed in its entirety. It tells the story of a rich merchant, who must cross the fictional Yahi Desert to close an oil deal. During the trip the class differences between him and his working-class porter (or "coolie" as he is called in most English language editions) are shown. As he becomes increasingly afraid of the desert, the merchant's brutality increases, and he feels terribly alone without police nearby to protect him
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Tartuffe
Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite (/tɑːrˈtʊf, -ˈtuːf/;[1] French: Tartuffe, ou l'Imposteur, pronounced [taʁtyf u lɛ̃pɔstœʁ]), first performed in 1664, is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière. The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire, and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theatre roles.Contents1 History 2 Characters 3 Plot 4 Controversy 5 Production history5.1 Modern productions6 Adaptations6.1 Film 6.2 Stage 6.3 Television 6.4 Opera 6.5 Audio7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksHistory[edit] Molière
Molière
wrote Tartuffe
Tartuffe
in 1664
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Ubu Roi
Ubu Roi
Ubu Roi
(Ubu the King or King Ubu) is a play by Alfred Jarry. It was first performed in Paris at the Théâtre de l'Œuvre, causing a riotous response in the audience as it opened and closed on December 10, 1896.[1][2] It is considered a wild, bizarre and comic play, significant for the way it overturns cultural rules, norms, and conventions. For those who were in the audience on that night to witness the response, including W. B. Yeats, it seemed an event of revolutionary importance
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Krapp's Last Tape
Krapp's Last Tape
Krapp's Last Tape
is a one-act play, in English, by Samuel Beckett. With a cast of one man, it was written for Northern Irish actor Patrick Magee and first titled "Magee monologue". (Patrick Magee is familiar to many moviegoers as the writer whom Alex cripples while invading his home and raping his wife in A Clockwork Orange.) It was inspired by Beckett's experience of listening to Magee reading extracts from Molloy and From an Abandoned Work on the BBC
BBC
Third Programme in December 1957.[1] The play was first performed as a curtain raiser to Endgame (from 28 October to 29 November 1958) at the Royal Court Theatre, London, directed by Donald McWhinnie and starring Patrick Magee
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