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San Francisco Bay Guardian
The San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco Bay Guardian
was a free alternative newspaper published weekly in San Francisco, California. It was founded in 1966 by Bruce B. Brugmann and his wife, Jean Dibble.[2] The paper was shut down on October 14, 2014.[3] It was relaunched in February 2016 as an online publication. The Bay Guardian was known for reporting, celebrating, and promoting left-wing and progressive issues within San Francisco and (albeit rarely) around the San Francisco Bay Area
San Francisco Bay Area
as a whole. This usually included muckraking, legislation to control and limit gentrification, and endorsement of political candidates and other laws and policies that fall within its political views. It also printed movie and music reviews, an annual nude beaches issue, and an annual sex issue
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Pacific Sun (newspaper)
The Pacific Sun is a free weekly newspaper published in Marin County, just north of San Francisco in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is the longest running alternative weekly in the nation.[2][3][4] The paper is published every Friday.[5]Contents1 History 2 The Serial 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Pacific Sun was founded in April 1963 in California
California
by Merrill and Joann Grohman in the back of a Stinson Beach grocery store. In 1966, the Pacific Sun moved its offices to San Rafael.[6] Steve McNamara, the former Sunday editor of the San Francisco Examiner, bought it from the Grohmans that year.[7] Ten months after McNamara took over as editor, the San Francisco Press Club awarded its first prize for the best news story in a northern California
California
non-daily paper for the Sun's story “The Night Nicasio Fired the Principal”, about a school board’s firing of a principal for admitting to marijuana use
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East Bay Express
The East Bay Express
East Bay Express
is an Oakland-based weekly newspaper serving the Berkeley, Oakland, and East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area. It is distributed throughout Alameda County and parts of Contra Costa County every Wednesday. The Express is known for its investigative and longform news and feature stories, along with its award-winning arts, food, and wine coverage
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Predatory Pricing
Predatory pricing (also undercutting) is a pricing strategy in which a product or service is set at a very low price with the intention of drive competitors out of the market or creating barriers to entry for potential new competitors. Theoretically, if competitors or potential competitors cannot sustain equal or lower prices without losing money, they go out of business or choose not to enter the business. The so-called predatory merchant then theoretically has fewer competitors or even is a de facto monopoly. Now, predatory pricing is considered anti-competitive in many jurisdictions and is illegal under competition laws. However, it can be difficult to prove that prices dropped because of deliberate predatory pricing, rather than legitimate price competition
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César Chávez
Cesar Chavez
Cesar Chavez
(born César Estrada Chávez,[1] locally [ˈsesaɾ esˈtɾaða ˈtʃaβes]; March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was an American labor leader and civil rights activist who, with Dolores Huerta, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association
National Farm Workers Association
(later the United Farm Workers
United Farm Workers
union, UFW) in 1962.[2] Originally a Mexican American farm worker, Chavez became the best known Latino American civil rights activist, and was strongly promoted by the American labor movement, which was eager to enroll Hispanic
Hispanic
members. His public-relations approach to unionism and aggressive but nonviolent tactics made the farm workers' struggle a moral cause with nationwide support
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Strikebreaker
A strikebreaker (sometimes derogatorily called a scab, blackleg, or knobstick) is a person who works despite an ongoing strike. Strikebreakers are usually individuals who are not employed by the company prior to the trade union dispute, but rather hired after or during the strike to keep the organization running. "Strikebreakers" may also refer to workers (union members or not) who cross picket lines to work. The use of strikebreakers is a worldwide phenomenon; however, many countries have passed laws outlawing their use as they undermine the collective bargaining process
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Strike Action
Strike action, also called labor strike, labour strike, or simply strike, is a work stoppage caused by the mass refusal of employees to work. A strike usually takes place in response to employee grievances. Strikes became common during the Industrial Revolution, when mass labor became important in factories and mines. In most countries, strike actions were quickly made illegal,[citation needed] as factory owners had far more power than workers. Most Western countries partially legalized striking in the late 19th or early 20th centuries. Strikes are sometimes used to pressure governments to change policies. Occasionally, strikes destabilize the rule of a particular political party or ruler; in such cases, strikes are often part of a broader social movement taking the form of a campaign of civil resistance. Notable examples are the 1980 Gdańsk Shipyard
Gdańsk Shipyard
or 1981 Warning Strike, led by Lech Wałęsa
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Tabloid (newspaper Format)
A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. A tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches (432 by 279 mm)" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet", although there is no standard size for this newspaper format. The term tabloid journalism refers to an emphasis on such topics as sensational crime stories, astrology, celebrity gossip and television, and is not a reference to newspapers printed in this format. Some small-format papers with a high standard of journalism refer to themselves as compact newspapers. Larger newspapers, traditionally associated with higher-quality journalism, are called broadsheets, even if the newspaper is now printed on smaller pages
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North Bay Bohemian
The North Bay Bohemian
North Bay Bohemian
is a free weekly newspaper published in the North Bay subregion of the San Francisco Bay Area, in California, United States. The newspaper is distributed in Sonoma and Napa counties. The newspaper began publication in 1979 as The Paper in the Guerneville area of western Sonoma County[2] by struggling artist turned community journalist Nick Valentine and jazz pianist Bob Lucas.[3] It was renamed the Sonoma County Independent in 1993 under the ownership of John Boland and James Carroll. In 1994 the Independent was purchased by Metro Newspapers, an independent group of three Bay Area alternative weeklies and the publication frequency was changed to weekly
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Metro Silicon Valley
Metro is a free weekly newspaper published by the San Jose, California, based Metro Newspapers. Also known as Metro Silicon Valley, the paper serves the greater Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
area. In addition to print form, Metro can be downloaded in PDF format for free from the publisher's website.[2] Metro also keeps tabs on local politics and the "chattering" class of San Jose through its weekly column, The Fly. The newspaper has been published since 1985 and is one of the remaining owner-operated publications in the alternative press
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Los Angeles Daily News
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Daily News is the second-largest-circulating paid daily newspaper of Los Angeles, California. It is the flagship of the Southern California
California
News Group, a branch of Colorado-based Digital First Media. The offices of the Daily News are in Woodland Hills, and much of the paper's reporting is targeted toward readers in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. Its stories tend to focus on issues involving valley businesses, education, and crime. The current editor is Frank Pine.[2] History[edit] The Daily News began publication in Van Nuys as the Van Nuys Call in 1911,[3] morphing into the Van Nuys News after a merger with a competing newspaper called the News
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Punitive Damages
Punitive damages, or exemplary damages, are damages intended to reform or deter the defendant and others from engaging in conduct similar to that which formed the basis of the lawsuit. Although the purpose of punitive damages is not to compensate the plaintiff, the plaintiff will receive all or some of the punitive damages award. Punitive damages are often awarded if compensatory damages are deemed an inadequate remedy. The court may impose them to prevent undercompensation of plaintiffs and to allow redress for undetectable torts and taking some strain away from the criminal justice system.[1] Punitive damages are most important for violations of the law that are hard to detect.[2] However, punitive damages awarded under court systems that recognize them may be difficult to enforce in jurisdictions that do not recognize them
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Gentrification
Gentrification
Gentrification
is a process of renovation of deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of the influx of more affluent residents.[1][2] This is a common and controversial topic in politics and in urban planning. Gentrification
Gentrification
can improve the quality of a neighborhood, while also potentially forcing relocation of current, established residents and businesses, causing them to move from a gentrified area, seeking lower cost housing and stores. Gentrification
Gentrification
often shifts a neighborhood’s racial/ethnic composition and average household income by developing new, more expensive housing, businesses and improved resources.[3] Conversations about gentrification have evolved, as many in the social-scientific community have questioned the negative connotations associated with the word gentrification
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Muckraking
The term muckraker was used in the Progressive Era
Progressive Era
to characterize reform-minded American journalists who attacked established institutions and leaders as corrupt. They typically had large audiences in some popular magazines. In the US, the modern term is investigative journalism — it has different and more pejorative connotations in British English — and investigative journalists in the US today are often informally called 'muckrakers'. The muckrakers played a highly visible role during the Progressive Era period, 1890s–1920s.[1] Muckraking magazines—notably McClure's
McClure's
of the publisher S. S
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San Francisco Bay Area
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area (referred to locally as the Bay Area) is a populous region surrounding the San Francisco, San Pablo and Suisun estuaries in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of California. Although the exact boundaries of the region vary depending on the source, the Bay Area is generally accepted to include the nine counties that border the aforementioned estuaries: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma. Other sources may exclude parts of or even entire counties, or include neighboring counties such as San Benito, San Joaquin, and Santa Cruz. Home to approximately 7.68 million people, Northern California’s nine-county Bay Area contains many cities, towns, airports, and associated regional, state, and national parks, connected by a complex multimodal transportation network
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Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
is the support for or advocacy of improvement of society by reform.[1] As a philosophy, it is based on the Idea of Progress, which asserts that advancements in science, technology, economic development, and social organization are vital to the improvement of the human condition. Progressivism
Progressivism
became highly significant during the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
in Europe, out of the belief that Europe
Europe
was demonstrating that societies could progress in civility from uncivilized conditions to civilization through strengthening the basis of empirical knowledge as the foundation of society.[2] Figures of the Enlightenment believed that progress had universal application to all societies and that these ideas would spread across the world from Europe.[2] The meanings of progressivism have varied over time and from different perspectives
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