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San Francisco Chronicle
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Chronicle is a newspaper serving primarily the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. It was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young.[2] The paper is currently owned by the Hearst Corporation, which bought it from the de Young family in 2000. It is the only major daily paper covering the city and county of San Francisco. The paper benefited from the growth of San Francisco
San Francisco
and was the largest circulation newspaper on the West Coast of the United States by 1880. Like many other newspapers, it has experienced a rapid fall in circulation in the early 21st century, and was ranked 24th by circulation nationally for the six months to March 2010
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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Gothic Revival Architecture
Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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The Newspaper Guild
The NewsGuild-CWA
NewsGuild-CWA
is a labor union founded by newspaper journalists in 1933 who noticed that unionized printers and truck drivers were making more money than they did
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Publishing
Publishing
Publishing
is the dissemination of literature, music, or information—the activity of making information available to the general public. In some cases, authors may be their own publishers, meaning originators and developers of content also provide media to deliver and display the content for the same. Also, the word publisher can refer to the individual who leads a publishing company or an imprint or to a person who owns/heads a magazine. Traditionally, the term refers to the distribution of printed works such as books (the "book trade") and newspapers
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Orlando Sentinel
The Orlando Sentinel
Orlando Sentinel
is the primary newspaper of Orlando, Florida
Orlando, Florida
and the Central Florida
Florida
region. It was founded in 1876
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Chicago Tribune
The Chicago
Chicago
Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by Tronc, Inc., formerly Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago
Chicago
metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region
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Granite Broadcasting Corporation
Granite Broadcasting Corporation is a broadcasting holding company in New York City which owns two television stations in the United States, in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Syracuse, New York. Granite was founded by W
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NBC
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American English language commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast. The network is headquartered at 30 Rockefeller Plaza
30 Rockefeller Plaza
in New York City, with additional major offices near Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(at 10 Universal City Plaza), and Chicago
Chicago
(at the NBC
NBC
Tower). The network is part of the Big Three television networks. NBC
NBC
is sometimes referred to as the "Peacock Network", in reference to its stylized peacock logo, introduced in 1956 to promote the company's innovations in early color broadcasting
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Young Broadcasting
Young Broadcasting, LLC was an American media company that owned or operated 12 television stations in 10 markets with a total U.S. television household coverage of 5.9%. The company was formerly known as Young Broadcasting
Young Broadcasting
Inc. and was the outgrowth of the ad representation firm Adam Young Inc., which was founded in 1944 by Adam Young. Previously a public company, Young Broadcasting
Young Broadcasting
voluntarily declared Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
on February 13, 2009 to restructure its debts. On June 24, 2010, the company emerged from bankruptcy as New Young Broadcasting Holding Co, Inc., shedding $800 million in debt and becoming one of the most financially secure broadcasting companies in the country.[1] Deborah A
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Tabloid (newspaper Format)
A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. A tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches (432 by 279 mm)" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet", although there is no standard size for this newspaper format. The term tabloid journalism refers to an emphasis on such topics as sensational crime stories, astrology, celebrity gossip and television, and is not a reference to newspapers printed in this format. Some small-format papers with a high standard of journalism refer to themselves as compact newspapers. Larger newspapers, traditionally associated with higher-quality journalism, are called broadsheets, even if the newspaper is now printed on smaller pages
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AsianWeek
AsianWeek
AsianWeek
was an online publication of Asian American
Asian American
news, across all Asian ethnic groups,[1] providing coverage of Asian-American issues such as the killing of Vincent Chin, Asian American
Asian American
college admissions, and quotas on Chinese students in competitive San Francisco examination schools. AsianWeek
AsianWeek
headquarters were located in San Francisco's Chinatown. It stopped publishing a print edition in 2009, and publication ceased altogether in 2012.Contents1 History 2 Major sections2.1 Opinion 2.2 Nation and World 2.3 Bay and California 2.4 Arts and Entertainment3 Controversies3.1 Kenneth Eng4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Dear Abby
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
is an advice column founded in 1956 by Pauline Phillips under the pen name " Abigail
Abigail
Van Buren" and carried on today by her daughter, Jeanne Phillips, who now owns the legal rights to the pen name.Contents1 History 2 Ask Ann Landers 3 Change in writer 4 In Popular Culture 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] According to Pauline Phillips, she came up with the pen name Abigail Van Buren by combining the name of Biblical figure Abigail
Abigail
in the Book of I Samuel, with the last name of former U.S. President Martin Van Buren. The column was syndicated by McNaught Syndicate from 1956 until 1966, when it moved to Universal Press Syndicate
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Cryptogram
A cryptogram is a type of puzzle that consists of a short piece of encrypted text.[1] Generally the cipher used to encrypt the text is simple enough that the cryptogram can be solved by hand. Frequently used are substitution ciphers where each letter is replaced by a different letter or number. To solve the puzzle, one must recover the original lettering. Though once used in more serious applications, they are now mainly printed for entertainment in newspapers and magazines. Other types of classical ciphers are sometimes used to create cryptograms
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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