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Salt Dome
A salt dome is a type of structural dome formed when a thick bed of evaporite minerals (mainly salt, or halite) found at depth intrudes vertically into surrounding rock strata, forming a diapir. It is important in petroleum geology because salt structures are impermeable and can lead to the formation of a stratigraphic trap. The formation of a salt dome begins with the deposition of salt in a restricted marine basin. Because the flow of salt-rich seawater into the basin is not balanced by outflow, much to all water lost from the basin is via evaporation, resulting in the precipitation and deposition of salt evaporites. The rate of sedimentation of salt is significantly larger than the rate of sedimentation of clastics,[1] but it is recognized that a single evaporation event is rarely enough to produce the vast quantities of salt needed to form a layer thick enough for salt diapirs to be formed
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Monolithic Dome
A monolithic dome (from Greek mono- and -lithic, meaning "one stone") is a structure cast in a one-piece form. The form may be permanent or temporary and may or may not remain part of the finished structure. Monolithic domes are a form of monolithic architecture. The igloo may be the earliest form of monolithic dome. While it is constructed of blocks of compressed snow, these blocks melt and re-freeze to form a strong, homogeneous structure. The dome-like shape of the igloo exhibits the two major advantages of a dome-shaped structure: great strength, and good insulation. The strength is due to the natural strength of the arch, and the insulation is due to the minimal surface area of a spherical section. The first modern monolithic dome structure was built in Provo, Utah, by architect Lee C. Knell, and opened in 1963 as an ice skating rink
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Fault (geology)
In geology, a fault is a planar fracture or discontinuity in a volume of rock across which there has been significant displacement as a result of rock-mass movement. Large faults within the Earth's crust result from the action of plate tectonic forces, with the largest forming the boundaries between the plates, such as subduction zones or transform faults.[1] Energy release associated with rapid movement on active faults is the cause of most earthquakes. Faults may also displace slowly, by aseismic creep.[2] A fault plane is the plane that represents the fracture surface of a fault. A fault trace or fault line is a place where the fault can be seen or mapped on the surface
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Proterozoic
The Proterozoic ( /ˌprtərəˈzɪk, prɒt-, -ər-, -trə-, -tr-/)[2][3][4] is a geological eon spanning the time from the appearance of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere to just before the proliferation of complex life (such as trilobites or corals) on the Earth. The name Proterozoic combines the two forms of ultimately Greek origin: protero- meaning "former, earlier", and -zoic, a suffix related to zoe "life"
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Neogene
A map of the world as it appeared during the Miocene epoch. (15 ma) The Neogene ( /ˈn.əˌn, ˈn.-/ NEE-ə-jeen, NEE-oh-)[3][4] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene and the later Pliocene. Some geologists[who?] assert that the Neogene cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. The term "Neogene" was coined in 1853 by the Austrian palaeontologist Moritz Hörnes (1815–1868).[5] During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged
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Hormuz Formation
The Hormuz Formation, Hormuz Series, Hormuz Evaporites or Hormuz Group is a sequence of evaporites that were deposited during the Ediacaran (Late Neoproterozoic) to Early Cambrian, a period previously referred to as the Infra-Cambrian. Most exposures of this sequence are in the form of emergent salt diapirs within anticlines of the Zagros fold and thrust belt. As a result of their involvement in post-depositional salt tectonics, the internal stratigraphy of the sequence is relatively poorly understood. They are the lateral equivalent of the evaporite-bearing Ara Group in the South Oman Basin.[1] The Hormuz Formation is known from a wide area of the Zagros Mountains and around and beneath the Persian Gulf. Two main depositional basins have been recognised, the North Gulf and South Gulf Basins, separated by the Qatar Arch. The basins were formed as a result of extensional tectonics towards the end of the Pan-African Orogeny
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Pennsylvanian (geology)

The Pennsylvanian (/ˌpɛn.səlˈvn.jən, -sɪl-, -v.ni.ən/ pen-səl-VAYN-yən, -⁠sil-, -⁠VAY-nee-ən,[1] also known as Upper Carboniferous or Late Carboniferous) is, in the ICS geologic timescale, the younger of two subperiods (or upper of two subsystems) of the Carboniferous Period. It lasted from roughly 323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago. As with most other geochronologic units, the rock beds that define the Pennsylvanian are well identified, but the exact date of the start and end are uncertain by a few hundred thousand years. The Pennsylvanian is named after the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, where the coal-productive beds of this age are widespread.[2] The division between Pennsylvanian and Mississippian comes from North American stratigraphy
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Utah
Coordinates: 39°N 111°W / 39°N 111°W / 39; -111 In the late 19th century, the federal government took issue with polygamy in the LDS Church. The LDS Church discontinued plural marriage in 1890, and in 1896 Utah gained admission to the Union. Many new people settled the area soon after the Mormon pioneers. Relations have often been strained between the LDS population and the non-LDS population.[130] These tensions have played a large part in Utah's history (Liberal Party vs. People's Party). Utah votes predominantly Republican
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