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Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre
The St. Bartholomew's Day massacre
St

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The Massacre Of St Bartholomew's Eve
The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve
The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve
is the completely missing fourth serial of the third season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from 5 to 26 February 1966. This serial marks the first appearance of Jackie Lane as companion-to-be Dodo Chaplet. Although audio recordings and still photographs of the story exist, no footage of this serial is known to have survived.Contents1 Plot 2 Production2.1 Alternative titles 2.2 Cast notes3 Commercial releases3.1 In print 3.2 Home media4 References 5 External links5.1 Reviews 5.2 Target novelisationPlot[edit]This article's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise
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Siege Of Rouen (1591)
André de Brancas Duke of Parma Carlos Colomav t eFrench Wars of ReligionMérindol (1545) Amboise (1560)1st–7th wars1562–63 Edict of Saint-Germain Vassy Rouen Toulouse Vergt Dreux Orléans Edict of Amboise1567–68 Saint-Denis Chartres1568–70 Jarnac La Roche-l'Abeille Orthez Moncontour1572–73 Mons St
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Treaty Of Fleix
The Treaty of Fleix (also known as the Edict of Fleix and the Peace of Fleix) was signed on 26 November 1580 by Henry III of France
Henry III of France
in Le Fleix. Negotiated by François, Duke of Anjou, who wished to focus military efforts on the Netherlands, the accord officially ended the seventh phase of the French Wars of Religion
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War Of The Three Henrys
The War of the Three Henrys
War of the Three Henrys
(1587[1]–1589) was the eighth and final conflict in the series of civil wars in France
France
known as the Wars of Religion
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Treaty Of Nemours
Articles of the Treaty of Nemours
Nemours
(or Treaty of Saint-Maur) were agreed upon in writing and signed in Nemours
Nemours
on 7 July 1585 between the Queen Mother, Catherine de' Medici, acting for the King, and representatives of the House of Guise, including the Duke of Lorraine.[1] Catherine hastened to Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, where on 13 July the treaty was signed between King Henry III of France
Henry III of France
and the leaders of the Catholic League, including Henri, duc de Guise.[2] The king was pressured by members of the Catholic League to sign the accord which was recognized by contemporaries as a renewal of the old French Wars of Religion.[3]Contents1 Context 2 Terms 3 Aftermath 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksContext[edit] On 10 June 1584, the duc d'Anjou, François d'Alençon died
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Battle Of Coutras
The Battle of Coutras, fought on 20 October 1587, was a major engagement in the French Religious Wars between a Huguenot (Protestant) army under Henry of Navarre (the future Henry IV of France) and a royalist army led by Anne, Duke of Joyeuse. Henry of Navarre was victorious, Joyeuse was killed while attempting to surrender.Contents1 Context 2 Battle 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksContext[edit] The Wars of Religion between the Catholics and Protestants in France had begun in 1562 and continued intermittently since, with temporary periods of nominal peace that were often also violent. The King of France Henry III conducted a conciliatory policy, as reflected in the enactment of the Edict of Beaulieu in 1576 and the Edict of Poitiers the following year. But a new crisis arose as the result of the death of the king's brother, Francis of Alençon, when the Huguenot, Henry of Navarre, became heir presumptive to the throne
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Battle Of Vimory
The Battle of Vimory
Vimory
occurred on 26 October 1587 between the French royal (Catholic) forces of King Henry III of France
France
commanded by Henry of Guise and German and Swiss mercenaires commanded by Fabien I, Burgrave
Burgrave
of Dohna
Dohna
and William-Robert de la Marck, Duke of Bouillon who were hired to assist Henry of Navarre's Huguenot
Huguenot
forces during the eighth and final war (1585-1598) of the French Wars of Religion. The Protestant mercenaries were funded by Elizabeth I of England
Elizabeth I of England
and the King of Denmark. After having pillaged the Lorraine region, they arrived in Burgundy and entered into the Beauce
Beauce
region. Unfortunately, conflicts divided the two commanders and their German and Swiss troops. The Swiss troops were surprised by Henry of Guise's army, and were routed
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Battle Of Arques
The Battle of Arques
Battle of Arques
occurred on 15–18 September 1589 between the French royal forces of King Henry IV of France
France
and troops of the Catholic League commanded by Charles of Lorraine, Duke of Mayenne during the eighth and final war (1585-1598) of the French Wars of Religion
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Day Of The Barricades
In the French Wars of Religion, the Day of the Barricades
Day of the Barricades
(in French: Journée des barricades), 12 May 1588, was an outwardly spontaneous public uprising in staunchly Catholic Paris
Paris
against the moderate, hesitant, temporizing policies of Henry III
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Henry IV Of France's Succession
Henry IV of France's succession
Henry IV of France's succession
to the throne in 1589 was followed by a four-year war of succession to establish his legitimacy. This was part of the French Wars of Religion
French Wars of Religion
(1562–1598). Henry IV inherited the throne after the assassination of Henry III, the last Valois king, who died without children. Henry was already King of Navarre, as the successor of his mother, Jeanne d'Albret, but he owed his succession to the throne of France to the line of his father, Antoine of Bourbon, an agnatic descendant of Louis IX. He was the first French king from the House of Bourbon. Henry's succession in 1589 proved far from straightforward. He and King Henry III were moving to besiege Paris at the time of the latter's death
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Battle Of Ivry
The Battle of Ivry
Battle of Ivry
was fought on 14 March 1590, during the French Wars of Religion. The battle was a decisive victory for Henry IV of France, leading Huguenot
Huguenot
and English forces against the Catholic League by the Duc de Mayenne and Spanish forces under the Count of Egmont. Henry's forces were victorious and he went on to lay siege to Paris.[1] The battle occurred on the plain of Épieds, Eure
Eure
near Ivry (later renamed Ivry-la-Bataille), Normandy. Ivry-la-Bataille
Ivry-la-Bataille
is located on the Eure
Eure
River and about thirty miles west of Paris, at the boundary between the Île-de- France
France
and the Beauce
Beauce
regions.Contents1 Prelude 2 The battle 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesPrelude[edit] Henry IV had moved rapidly to besiege Dreux, a town controlled by the League
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Siege Of Paris (1590)
City of Paris Catholic League of France SpainCommanders and leaders Henry IV of France Peregrine Bertie Duke of Nemours Duke of ParmaStrength12,000 rising to 25,000 Approx: 30,000–50,000v t eFrench Wars of ReligionMérindol (1545) Amboise (1560)1st–7th wars1562–63 Edict of Saint-Germain Vassy Rouen Toulouse Vergt Dreux Orléans Edict of Amboise1567–68 Saint-Denis Chartres1568–70 Jarnac La Roche-l'Abeille Orthez Moncontour1572–73 Mons St
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Siege Of Caudebec
Strategic victory for Henry IV[1][2][3]Successful escape & retreat of Parma's army[4][5]Belligerents Kingdom of France  England United Provinces  Spain Catholic LeagueCommanders and leaders Henry IV of France Duke of Parma Duke of MayenneStrength25,000[6] 15,000[1]Casualties and lossesunknown Heavy[7]v t eFrench Wars of ReligionMérindol (1545) Amboise (1560)1st–7th wars1562–63 Edict of Saint-Germain Vassy Rouen Toulouse Vergt Dreux Orléans Edict of Amboise1567–68 Saint-Denis Chartres1568–70 Jarnac La Roche-l'Abeille Orthez Moncontour1572–73 Mons St
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Edict Of Beaulieu
The Edict of Beaulieu (also known at the time as the Peace of Monsieur) was promulgated from Beaulieu-lès-Loches[1] on 6 May 1576[2] by Henry III of France, who was pressured by Alençon's support of the Protestant
Protestant
army besieging Paris that spring. The Edict, which was negotiated by the king's brother, Monsieur— François, duc d'Alençon, who was now made duc d'Anjou—[3] gave Huguenots the right of public worship for their religion, thenceforth officially called the religion prétendue réformée ("supposed reformed religion"), throughout France, except at Paris and at Court. In eight parlements there were also to be established chambers, called the mi-partis because they were composed of equal numbers of Catholics and Huguenots; eight places de sûreté were to be given to the Huguenots; there was to be a disclaimer of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew, and the families which had suffered from it were to be reinstated
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Battle Of Craon
The Battle of Craon
Battle of Craon
took place between 21–24 May 1592, between the French Royal army under the Duke of Montpensier and François de Bourbon, Prince of Conti, reinforced by English contingents under Sir John Norreys, against the combined forces of Spain
Spain
and the Catholic League of France during the War of the Three Henrys
War of the Three Henrys
and the Anglo-Spanish War (1585–1604), in the context of the French Wars of Religion.[1] Craon was besieged by the army of Henry of Navarre, but the defenders, supported by a Catholic relief force recruited by Philippe Emmanuel, Duke of Mercœur, resisted
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