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Saint Thérèse Of Lisieux
Saint
Saint
Thérèse of Lisieux
Lisieux
(French: Sainte-Thérèse de Lisieux), born Marie Françoise-Thérèse Martin (2 January 1873 – 30 September 1897), also known as Saint
Saint
Thérèse of the Child Jesus
Child Jesus
and the Holy Face, O.C.D., was a French Catholic Discalced Carmelite
Discalced Carmelite
nun who is widely venerated in modern times. She is popularly known as "The Little Flower of Jesus" or simply "The Little Flower". Thérèse has been a highly influential model of sanctity for Catholics and for others because of the "simplicity and practicality of her approach to the spiritual life"
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Spiritual Dryness
In Catholic spirituality, spiritual dryness or desolation is a lack of spiritual consolation in one's spiritual life. It is a form of spiritual crisis experienced subjectively as a sense of separation from God or lack of spiritual feeling, especially during contemplative prayer. Paradoxically, it is thought that spiritual dryness can lead to greater love of God.[1]Contents1 Theology 2 Description by saints 3 See also 4 ReferencesTheology[edit] The Catechism of the Catholic Church
Catechism of the Catholic Church
(CCC) describes spiritual dryness as a difficulty sometimes experienced in one's prayer life, which may lead to discouragement. Dryness can expose a lack of "rootedness" in the faith, but also provides an opportunity to cling more strongly to God
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Spiritual Direction
Spiritual direction is the practice of being with people as they attempt to deepen their relationship with the divine, or to learn and grow in their own personal spirituality. The person seeking direction shares stories of his or her encounters of the divine, or how he or she is cultivating a life attuned to spiritual things. The director listens and asks questions to assist the directee in his or her process of reflection and spiritual growth
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Apophatic Theology
Apophatic theology, also known as negative theology,[1] is a type of theological thinking and religious practice that attempts to approach God, the Divine, by negation, to speak only in terms of what may not be said about the perfect goodness that is God.[web 1] It forms a pair together with cataphatic theology, which approaches God
God
or the Divine by affirmations c.q
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Ascetical Theology
Ascetical theology
Ascetical theology
is the organized study or presentation of spiritual teachings found in Christian Scripture
Scripture
and the Church Fathers
Church Fathers
that help the faithful to more perfectly follow Christ
Christ
and attain to Christian perfection. The word ascetic is from the Greek word ἄσκησις askesis,[1] meaning practice. The English term ascesis means "the practice of self-discipline".[2] Christian asceticism
Christian asceticism
is commonly thought to imply self-denial for a spiritual purpose
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Cataphatic Theology
Cataphatic theology
Cataphatic theology
or kataphatic theology is theology that uses "positive" terminology to describe or refer to the divine – specifically, God – i.e. terminology that describes or refers to what the divine is believed to be, in contrast to the "negative" terminology used in apophatic theology to indicate what it is believed the divine is not.Contents1 Etymology 2 Terminology 3 Eastern Orthodoxy 4 Roman Catholicism 5 Cataphatic treatment of ultimate reality in Buddhism 6 In Gaudiya-vaishnavism 7 See also 8 Notes 9 BibliographyEtymology[edit] "Cataphatic" comes from the Greek word κατάφασις kataphasis meaning "affirmation,"[1] coming from κατά kata (an intensifier)[2] and φάναι phanai ("to speak"). Terminology[edit] To speak of God
God
or the divine kataphatically is thought by some to be by its nature a form of limiting to God
God
or divine
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Catholic Spirituality
Catholic spirituality
Catholic spirituality
includes the various ways in which Catholics live out their Baptismal promise, through prayer and action
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Christianity And Hellenistic Philosophy
Christianity and Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
refers to the complex interaction between Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
and early Christianity during the first to the fourth centuries. As Christianity spread throughout the Hellenic world, an increasing number of church leaders were educated in Greek philosophy. The dominant philosophical traditions of the Greco-Roman world then were Stoicism, Platonism, and Epicureanism
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Mystical Theology
Mystical theology
Mystical theology
is the branch of theology that explains mystical practices and states, as induced by contemplative practices such as contemplative prayer.Contents1 Early Christianity1.1 Early Alexandrian tradition 1.2 St
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Neoplatonism And Christianity
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalPart of a series onChristian mysticismTheology · PhilosophyApophatic Ascetical Cataphatic Catholic spirituality Hellenistic Mystical theology NeoplatonicHenosisPracticesMonasticismMonasticism Asceticism Spiritual directionMeditationMeditation Lectio DivinaActive ascetismContemplationHesychasm Jesus prayer QuietismStages of Christian perfection DivinizationCatharsis TheosisKenosis Spiritual drynessPassive ascetismAbstinencePeople (by era or century)AntiquityAncient African Origen Gregory of Nyssa Pseudo-DionysiusDesert FathersPaul of Thebes Anthony the Great Arsenius the Great Poemen Macarius of Egypt Moses the Black Syncletica Athanasius John Chrysostom Hilarion John Cassian11th · 12thBernard of Clairvaux Guigo II Hildegard of Bingen Symeon the New Theologian


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Henosis
Henosis
Henosis
(Ancient Greek: ἕνωσις) is the classical Greek word for mystical "oneness", "union" or "unity." In Platonism, and especially Neoplatonism, the goal of henosis is union with what is fundamental in reality: the One (Τὸ Ἕν), the Source, or Monad.[1] The Neoplatonic concept has precedents in the Greek mystery religions[2] as well as parallels in Eastern philosophy.[3] It is further developed in the Corpus Hermeticum, in Christian theology, Alevism, soteriology and mysticism, and is an important factor in the historical development of monotheism during Late Antiquity.Contents1 Etymology 2 Pr
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Christian Monasticism
Christian monasticism
Christian monasticism
is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship. It began to develop early in the history of the Christian Church, modeled upon scriptural examples and ideals, including those in the Old Testament, but not mandated as an institution in the scriptures. It has come to be regulated by religious rules (e.g. the Rule of Saint Augustine, Anthony the Great, St Pachomius, the Rule of St Basil, the Rule of St Benedict,) and, in modern times, the Canon law
Canon law
of the respective Christian denominations that have forms of monastic living. Those living the monastic life are known by the generic terms monks (men) and nuns (women)
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Asceticism
Asceticism
Asceticism
(/əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm/; from the Greek: ἄσκησις áskesis, "exercise, training") is a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from sensual pleasures, often for the purpose of pursuing spiritual goals. Ascetics may withdraw from the world for their practices or continue to be part of their society, but typically adopt a frugal lifestyle, characterised by the renunciation of material possessions and physical pleasures, and time spent fasting while concentrating on the practice of religion or reflection upon spiritual matters.[3] Asceticism
Asceticism
is classified into two types
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Christian Meditation
Christian meditation
Christian meditation
is a form of prayer in which a structured attempt is made to become aware of and reflect upon the revelations of God.[1] The word meditation comes from the Latin word meditārī, which has a range of meanings including to reflect on, to study and to practice. Christian meditation
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Relic
In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial. Relics are an important aspect of some forms of Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Shamanism, and many other religions. Relic
Relic
derives from the Latin
Latin
reliquiae, meaning "remains", and a form of the Latin verb relinquere, to "leave behind, or abandon"
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Lectio Divina
In Christianity, Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
( Latin
Latin
for "Divine Reading") is a traditional Benedictine practice of scriptural reading, meditation and prayer intended to promote communion with God and to increase the knowledge of God's Word.[1] It does not treat Scripture
Scripture
as texts to be studied, but as the Living Word.[2] Traditionally, Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
has four separate steps: read; meditate; pray; contemplate. First a passage of Scripture
Scripture
is read, then its meaning is reflected upon. This is followed by prayer and contemplation on the Word of God.[3] The focus of Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
is not a theological analysis of biblical passages but viewing them with Christ
Christ
as the key to their meaning
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