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Saddle Carpetshark
The saddle carpetshark ( Cirrhoscyllium japonicum) is a carpet shark of the family Parascylliidae found around Japan, between latitudes 35°N and 24°N, at depths between 250 and 290 m (820 and 950 ft). The saddle carpetshark is known to grow up to 49 cm (19 in) in length, and it is an oviparous. References[edit]Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). "Cirrhoscyllium japonicum" in FishBase. July 2006 version. Compagno, Leonard J. V.; Dando, Marc; Fowler, Sarah L. (2005). Sharks of the World (illustrated ed.). New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-12072-2. v t eExtant shark speciesKingdom Animalia Phylum Chordata Subphylum Vertebrata Class Chondrichthyes Subclass Elasmobranchii Subdivision SelachiiOrder Carcharhiniformes
Carcharhiniformes
(Ground sharks)Hemigaleidae (Weasel sharks)Hemipristis Snaggletooth shark
Snaggletooth shark
(H
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Barbeled Houndshark
Mustelus osborni Fowler, 1923 Triaenodon smithii Müller & Henle, 1839The barbeled houndshark (Leptocharias smithii) is a species of ground shark and the only member of the family Leptochariidae. This demersal species is found in the coastal waters of the eastern Atlantic Ocean from Mauritania
Mauritania
to Angola, at depths of 10–75 m (33–246 ft). It favors muddy habitats, particularly around river mouths. The barbeled houndshark is characterized by a very slender body, nasal barbels, long furrows at the corners of the mouth, and sexually dimorphic teeth. Its maximum known length is 82 cm (32 in). Likely strong-swimming and opportunistic, the barbeled houndshark has been known to ingest bony fishes, invertebrates, fish eggs, and even inedible objects. It is viviparous with females bearing litters of 7 young; the developing embryos are sustained via a unique globular placental structure
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Elasmobranchii
Elasmobranchii
Elasmobranchii
(/ɪˌlæzməˈbræŋkiaɪ/[8]) is a subclass of Chondrichthyes
Chondrichthyes
or cartilaginous fish, including the sharks (superorder Selachii) and the rays, skates, and sawfish (superorder Batoidea). Members of this subclass are characterised by having five to seven pairs of gill clefts opening individually to the exterior, rigid dorsal fins and small placoid scales on the skin. The teeth are in several series; the upper jaw is not fused to the cranium, and the lower jaw is articulated with the upper. The details of this jaw anatomy vary between species, and help distinguish the different elasmobranch clades. The pelvic fins in males are modified to create claspers for the transfer of sperm
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Data Deficient
A data deficient (DD) species is one which has been categorised by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
as offering insufficient information for a proper assessment of conservation status to be made
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Snaggletooth Shark
The snaggletooth shark, or fossil shark ( Hemipristis
Hemipristis
elongata), is a species of weasel shark, in the family Hemigaleidae, and the only extant member of the genus Hemipristis. It is found in the Indo-West Pacific, including the Red Sea, from southeast Africa
Africa
to the Philippines, north to China, and south to Australia, at depths of from 1 to 130 m. This shark can be found near the bottom of the water column of coastal areas, but can be found at continental and insular shelves.[1] Its length is up to 240 cm (7.87 ft) .[2] Despite being only vulnerable to extinction, this shark is very rarely seen.Contents1 Anatomy 2 Food 3 Commercial uses 4 ReferencesAnatomy[edit]HeadToothThe snaggletooth's coloration is light grey or bronze with no prominent markings. As its name suggests, it has sharp, serrated teeth on the upper jaw and hooked teeth on the bottom jaw
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Hemigaleus
This genus is characterized by a rounded snout and short gill slits. The mouth is short and broadly arched; the teeth have very short cusps, without toothless spaces at the jaw midlines. The dorsal and pelvic fins, and the lower caudal lobe are strongly falchate. At one time or another, this genus has encompassed up to nine species, but most were eventually split off into other genera. Neogaleus Whitley, 1931 is a junior synonym of this genus. Hemigaleus
Hemigaleus
australiensis W. T
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Australian Weasel Shark
The Australian weasel shark
Australian weasel shark
( Hemigaleus
Hemigaleus
australiensis) is an uncommon species of ground shark in the family Hemigaleidae. It inhabits shallow waters off northern Australia
Australia
to a depth of 170 m (560 ft); smaller sharks frequent sand and seagrass habitat and shift to coral reefs as they grow older. A slim, drab species reaching a length of 1.1 m (3.6 ft), it has sickle-shaped fins with dark tips on the second dorsal fin and caudal fin upper lobe. Its upper teeth are broad with strong serrations only on the trailing edge. The lateral line along each side is prominent and exhibits a downward curve below the second dorsal fin. Feeding almost exclusively on octopuses and other cephalopods, the Australian weasel shark
Australian weasel shark
mostly hunts near the sea floor
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Sicklefin Weasel Shark
? Hemigaleus
Hemigaleus
machlani Herre, 1929 ?Negogaleus brachygnathus Chu, 1960The sicklefin weasel shark ( Hemigaleus
Hemigaleus
microstoma) is an uncommon species of ground shark in the family Hemigaleidae. It is native to southern India, southern China, and parts of Southeast Asia, living in shallow waters down to a depth of 170 m (560 ft). This lightly built shark is characterized by its very short mouth, broad upper teeth with serrations only on the trailing edge, and strongly sickle-shaped fins with obvious white tips on the two dorsal fins. It is light grey or bronze in colour, often with small white blotches on its sides, and reaches a maximum known length of 1.1 m (3.6 ft). Spending most of its time close to the sea floor, the sicklefin weasel shark is a specialist predator of cephalopods. Its reproductive mode is viviparous, in which the unborn young form a placental connection to their mother
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Paragaleus
This genus has a rounded or slightly pointed snout, short gill slits, and a broadly arched mouth. The upper teeth have long cusps, and no toothless spaces occur at the jaw midlines. The dorsal and pelvic fins and the lower caudal lobe are not falchate in shape. Known fossil species include P. pulchellus and P. antunesi. Whitetip weasel shark
Whitetip weasel shark
( Paragaleus
Paragaleus
leucolomatus) Compagno & Smale, 1985 (whitetip weasel shark) [1] Atlantic weasel shark
Atlantic weasel shark
( Paragaleus
Paragaleus
pectoralis) (Garman, 1906) (Atlantic weasel shark) [2] Slender weasel shark
Slender weasel shark
( Paragaleus
Paragaleus
randalli) Compagno, Krupp & K. E. Carpenter, 1996 (slender weasel shark) [3] Straight-tooth weasel shark
Straight-tooth weasel shark
( Paragaleus
Paragaleus
tengi) (J. S. T
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Proscylliidae
See textThe finback catsharks are a small family, the Proscylliidae, of ground sharks.[1] They can be found in warm seas worldwide and are often the most numerous and common shark in tropical regions. They are generally less than 1 m in length, and are slow-moving predators that feed on bony fish and small invertebrates. Although some bear live young, the majority lay eggs with almost fully developed young; these egg cases, known as "mermaid's purses", are unique in appearance to each species.Contents1 Taxonomy1.1 Genus Proscyllium 1.2 Genus Eridacnis 1.3 Genus Ctenacis2 Distribution 3 Lifecycle3.1 Reproduction4 Human interactions 5 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] Genus Proscyllium[edit] Graceful catshark
Graceful catshark
( Proscyllium habereri) was first discovered by Hildendorf in 1901.[1] Proscyllium venustum is found in temperate regions. It is distributed along the Northwest Pacific, primarily Japan
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Harlequin Catshark
The harlequin catshark (Ctenacis fehlmanni) is a species of finback catshark, part of the family Proscylliidae, and the only member of the genus Ctenacis. This shark is found in the western Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
off the coast of Somalia, at depths between 70 and 170 m. The 46 cm holotype was the only specimen that was ever found. References[edit]^ Ebert, D.A., Akhilesh, K.V., Tesfamichael, D., Valinassab, T. & Cronin, E.S. 2017. Ctenacis fehlmanni. The IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species
Species
2017: e.T161499A109905559. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-2.RLTS.T161499A109905559.en. Downloaded on 1 October 2017.Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). "Ctenacis fehlmanni" in FishBase
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Pygmy Ribbontail Catshark
Proscyllium alcocki Misra, 1950The pygmy ribbontail catshark ( Eridacnis radcliffei) is a species of finback catshark, family Proscylliidae, distributed patchily in the western Indo-Pacific
Indo-Pacific
from Tanzania
Tanzania
to the Philippines. It occurs around the edges of continental and insular shelves at a depth of 71–766 m (233–2,513 ft), typically on or near mud bottoms. One of the smallest living shark species, the pygmy ribbontail catshark grows to a maximum known length of 24 cm (9.4 in). It has a slender body with a low, ribbon-like tail fin, and is dark brown in color with blackish dorsal fin markings and tail bands. This shark feeds mainly on bony fishes, followed by crustaceans and then squid. It is aplacental viviparous with females bearing litters of 1–2 relatively large pups
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Graceful Catshark
The graceful catshark ( Proscyllium habereri) is a species of finback catshark, belonging to the family Proscylliidae. This shark is found in the western Pacific Ocean, from southeastern Japan
Japan
to Vietnam
Vietnam
and northwestern Java, at depths between 50 and 100 m. Females can reach a length of 65 cm. References[edit]^ Ebert, D.A, 2009. Proscyllium habereri. The IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species
Species
2009: e.T161733A5491178. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2009-2.RLTS.T161733A5491178.en. Downloaded on 06 September 2017.Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). " Proscyllium habereri" in FishBase
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Pseudotriakidae
The Pseudotriakidae
Pseudotriakidae
are a small family of ground sharks, belonging to the order Carcharhiniformes, containing the false catsharks (genera Pseudotriakis
Pseudotriakis
and Planonasus) and gollumsharks (genus Gollum). It contains the only ground shark species that exhibit intrauterine oophagy, in which developing fetuses are nourished by eggs produced by their mother.[1] Undescribed species[edit] Two as yet undescribed species are known - one in the genus Gollum, (Gollum sp. B) - the white-marked gollumshark, and the pygmy false catshark of undetermined genus which may be close to Planonasus parini.[2][3] References[edit]^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Pseudotriakidae" in FishBase. December 2012 version. ^ Compagno, L.J.V., M. Dando and S. Fowler (2005). Sharks of the World. Princeton University Press
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