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Sacred Mysteries
Sacred mysteries
Sacred mysteries
are the areas of supernatural phenomena associated with a divinity or a religious ideology. Sacred mysteries
Sacred mysteries
may be either:Religious beliefs, rituals or practices which are kept secret from non-believers, or lower levels of believers, who have not had an initiation into the higher levels of belief (the concealed knowledge may be called esoteric). Beliefs of the religion which are public knowledge but cannot be easily explained by normal rational or scientific means.Although the term "mystery" is not often used in anthropology, access by initiation or rite of passage to otherwise secret beliefs is an extremely common feature of indigenous religions all over the world. Mysticism
Mysticism
may be defined as an area of philosophical or religious thought which focuses on mysteries in the first sense above
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Wrisberg Epitaph
The Wrisberg Epitaph
Epitaph
is a triptych, which was created by the Hildesheim
Hildesheim
painter Johannes Hopffe († 1615) in 1585 as an epitaph for the Domherr
Domherr
Ernst von Wrisberg. The original frame does not survive. Of the panels, which were hidden during the Second World War, the central one could be viewed in the south transept of Hildesheim Cathedral until January 2010. During the renovation of the cathedral (2010–2014) the three panels were on display in a reconstructed frame in the Weserrenaissance-Museum in Schloss Brake, Lemgo. Style and description[edit] The three large panels in the Mannerist style have the same format. The outer panels show the Nativity and Resurrection
Resurrection
of Christ, drawing on models from the Italian Renaissance. The most novel portion is the central panel. This serves as a painted catechism of the Catholic reform
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Early Church
Early Christianity
Christianity
is the period of Christianity
Christianity
preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period
Ante-Nicene Period
(from the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
until Nicea). The first Christians, as described in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, were all Jews
Jews
either by birth or conversion, for which the biblical term "proselyte" is used,[1] and referred to by historians as Jewish Christians
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Resurrection Of Jesus
The resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus
Jesus
rose again from the dead
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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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Biblical Greek
Koine Greek
Koine Greek
(UK English /ˈkɔɪniː/,[1] US English /kɔɪˈneɪ/, /ˈkɔɪneɪ/ or /kiːˈniː/;[2][3]), also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during Hellenistic and Roman antiquity and the early Byzantine era, or Late Antiquity. It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries
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The Mystery Of Faith
"The mystery of faith" and "a mystery of faith" are phrases found in different contexts and with a variety of meanings, either as translations of Greek τὸ μυστήριον τῆς πίστεως or Latin
Latin
mysterium fidei or as independent English phrases.Contents1 Two English translations of 1 Timothy 3:9 2 Theosophical idea 3 Theological term 4 Translation of a phrase in the Roman-Rite Mass 5 References 6 External linksTwo English translations of 1 Timothy 3:9[edit] The phrase "the mystery of faith" is given as a translation of the phrase "τὸ μυστήριον τῆς πίστεως" in 1 Timothy 3:9 in two English versions of the Bible: the Wycliffe Bible
Wycliffe Bible
and the Douay-Rheims Bible
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Catechism Of The Catholic Church
The Catechism
Catechism
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(Latin: Catechismus Catholicae Ecclesiae; commonl
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Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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First Vatican Council
The First Vatican Council
First Vatican Council
(Latin: Concilium Vaticanum Primum) was convoked by Pope Pius IX
Pope Pius IX
on 29 June 1868, after a period of planning an
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Anathema
Anathema, in common usage, is something or someone that is detested or shunned. In its other main usage, it is a formal excommunication.[1][2][3] The latter meaning, its ecclesiastical sense, is based on New Testament
New Testament
usage. In the Old Testament, anathema referred either to something (living or inanimate) that was consecrated or something denounced as evil or accursed and set aside for sacrificial offering.[4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Religious usage2.1 Judaism 2.2 New Testament 2.3 Early Church 2.4 Orthodoxy 2.5 Catholicism3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] Anathema
Anathema
(in the sense of a curse) attributed to Pope Gregory XI Anathema
Anathema
derives from Ancient Greek: ἀνάθεμα,[5] anáthema, meaning "an offering" or "anything dedicated",[3] itself derived from the verb ἀνατίθημι, anatíthēmi, meaning "to offer up"
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Sacramentals
Sacramentals
Sacramentals
are material objects, things or actions (sacramentalia) set apart or blessed by the Roman and Eastern Catholic churches, the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, the Church of the East, the Anglican churches, the Independent and Old Catholic churches, the Lutheran churches, and the Methodist churches to manifest the respect due to the sacraments and so to excite pious thoughts and to increase devotion to the Church.Contents1 Biblical basis 2 Denominational usage2.1 Anglican 2.2 Catholic 2.3 Pentecostal3 References 4 External linksBiblical basis[edit] The Bibli
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Hildesheim Cathedral
Hildesheim
Hildesheim
Cathedral
Cathedral
(German: Hildesheimer Dom), officially the Cathedral
Cathedral
of the Assumption of Mary
Assumption of Mary
(German: St. Mariä Himmelfahrt), is a medieval Roman Catholic cathedral in the city centre of Hildesheim, Germany, that has been on the UNESCO
UNESCO
World Cultural Heritage list since 1985, together with the nearby St. Michael's Church. The cathedral church was built between 1010 and 1020 in the Romanesque style. It follows a symmetrical plan with two apses, that is characteristic of Ottonian Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
in Old Saxony
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Catechumen
In ecclesiology, a catechumen (/ˌkætɪˈkjuːmən, -mɛn/; via Latin catechumenus from Greek κατηχούμενος katēkhoumenos, "one being instructed", from κατά kata, "down" and ἦχος ēkhos, "sound") is a person receiving instruction from a catechist in the principles of the Christian religion with a view to baptism
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Persecution Of Christians
The persecution of Christians
Christians
can be historically traced from the first century of the Christian
Christian
era based on the biblical account of Jesus
Jesus
to the present day. Early Christians
Christians
were persecuted for their faith at the hands of both Jews
Jews
from whose religion Christianity
Christianity
arose and the Romans who controlled many of the lands across which early Christianity
Christianity
was spread
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Eastern Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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