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Sacramental Wine
Sacramental wine, Communion wine or altar wine is wine obtained from grapes and intended for use in celebration of the Eucharist
Eucharist
(referred to also as the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion, among other names). The same wine, if intended for use in ceremonies of non-Christian religions or for ordinary use, would not normally be described by these terms.Contents1 History 2 Composition2.1 Catholic Church
Catholic Church
norms3 Manner of consumption 4 Industry 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Wine
Wine
was used in the earliest celebrations of the Lord's Supper
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Early Church
Early Christianity
Christianity
is the period of Christianity
Christianity
preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period
Ante-Nicene Period
(from the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
until Nicea). The first Christians, as described in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, were all Jews
Jews
either by birth or conversion, for which the biblical term "proselyte" is used,[1] and referred to by historians as Jewish Christians
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Black Mass
A Black Mass
Black Mass
is a ritual characterized by the inversion of the Traditional Latin Mass celebrated by the Roman Catholic Church. In the 19th century the Black Mass
Black Mass
became popularized in French literature, in books such as Satanism and Witchcraft, by Jules Michelet, and Là-bas, by Joris-Karl Huysmans. Modern revivals began with H. T. F
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Metousiosis
Metousiosis
Metousiosis
is a Greek term (μετουσίωσις) that means a change of ousia (οὐσία, "essence, inner reality").Contents1 History 2 Theology and dogmatic status 3 Eastern Orthodox use of the term metousiosis 4 Oriental Orthodox 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Cyril Lucaris
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Sacrament
A sacrament is a Christian rite recognised as of particular importance and significance. There are various views on the existence and meaning of such rites. Many Christians consider the sacraments to be a visible symbol of the reality of God, as well as a means by which God enacts his grace
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Corpus Christi (feast)
The Feast of Corpus Christi ( Latin
Latin
for "Body of Christ") is the Roman Rite liturgical solemnity celebrating the real presence of the body and blood of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, in the Eucharist—known as transubstantiation. Two months earlier, the Eucharist
Eucharist
is observed on Holy Thursday
Holy Thursday
in a somber atmosphere leading to Good Friday. Corpus Christi emphasizes the joy of the Eucharist
Eucharist
being the body and blood of Jesus Christ. The feast is liturgically celebrated on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday or, "where the Solemnity
Solemnity
of The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ is not a holy day of obligation, it is assigned to the Sunday after the Most Holy Trinity as its proper day".[1] At the end of Holy Mass, there is often a procession of the Blessed Sacrament, generally displayed in a monstrance
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Reserved Sacrament
During the Liturgy
Liturgy
of the Eucharist, the second part of the Mass, the elements of bread and wine are considered to have been changed into the veritable Body and Blood of Jesus Christ. The manner in which this occurs is referred to by the term transubstantiation, a theory of St. Thomas Aquinas, in the Roman Catholic Church. Members of the Orthodox, Lutheran, and Anglican
Anglican
communions also believe that Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
is really and truly present in the bread and wine, but they believe that the way in which this occurs must forever remain a sacred mystery. In many Christian churches some portion of the consecrated elements is set aside and reserved after the reception of Communion and referred to as the reserved sacrament. The reserved sacrament is usually stored in a tabernacle, a locked cabinet made of precious materials and usually located on, above, or near the high altar
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Ordinance (Christianity)
Ordinance may refer to: Law[edit] Ordinance (Belgium), a law adopted by the Brussels Parliament or the Common Community Commission Ordinance (India) Ordinance (university), a particular class of internal legislation in a United Kingdom university Act of Parliament, in some jurisdictions, such as England when the parliament operated without regal sanctionRoyal ordinance, see DecreeBy-law, a rule established by an organization to
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Anamnesis (Christianity)
Anamnesis may refer to: Anamnesis (Christianity), a Christian concept involved in the Eucharist Medical history, information gained by a physician by asking specific questions of a patient "Anamnesis" (Millennium), a 1998 television episode Anamnesis (philosophy), a concept in Plato's epistemological and psychological theoryThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Anamnesis. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Sacrament (LDS Church)
In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
(LDS Church), the Holy Sacrament
Sacrament
of the Lord's Supper,[1] most often simply referred to as the sacrament, is the ordinance in which participants eat bread and drink water in remembrance of the body and blood of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. It is similar to the Eucharist
Eucharist
in the Catholic Church, or communion in Protestant denominations. Normally, the sacrament is provided every Sunday as part of the sacrament meeting in each LDS Church congregation. In the LDS Church, the word "ordinance" is used approximately as the word sacrament is used in many other denominations of Christianity. In the LDS Church, the sacrament is a specific ordinance
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Receptionism
Receptionism is a theological doctrine according to which, while the bread and wine in the Eucharist
Eucharist
continue to exist unchanged after consecration, the faithful communicant receives together with them the body and blood of Christ.[1] The term itself seems not to have appeared before 1867.[1] In Anglicanism[edit] This doctrine originated in the Church of England
Church of England
during the Reformation. Although older authors such as Dix[2] and Gibson[3] describe Cranmer's Eucharistic theology as "Zwinglian", more recent ones such as MacCulloch,[4] Bates[5] and Beckwith & Tiller[6] class it as "receptionism". It was also held in some form by Richard Hooker.[7] According to him, the bread is unchanged at the blessing of the priest, but becomes an effectual spiritual sign when received by someone in faith.[8] This Eucharistic teaching was commonly held by 16th and 17th-century Anglican theologians
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Consecration
Consecration
Consecration
is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups
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1 Corinthians 10
1 Corinthians 10 is the tenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes in Ephesus.[1][2] In this chapter Paul writes about the Israelites' Exodus journey and the Eucharist, and returns to the subject of food offered to idols.[3] The argument concerning meats offered to idols is resumed in 1 Corinthians 10:14.[4]Contents1 Text 2 Structure 3 Old Testament examples 4 Verse 13 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksText[edit]The original text is written in Koine Greek. Some most ancient manuscripts containing this chapter are:Codex Vaticanus (AD 325-350) Codex Sinaiticus (AD 330-360) Codex Alexandrinus (ca. AD 400-440) Codex Ephraemi Rescriptus (ca. AD 450; complete). Codex Freerianus (ca. AD 450; extant: verses 29) Codex Claromontanus (ca. AD 550) Codex Coislinianus (ca
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Host Desecration
Host desecration
Host desecration
is a form of sacrilege in Christian denominations that follow the doctrine of real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. It involves the mistreatment or malicious use of a consecrated host—the sacred bread used in the Eucharistic service of the Divine Liturgy or Mass. It is proscribed by the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, as well as in certain Protestant
Protestant
traditions (including Anglicanism, Lutheranism, and Methodism). In Catholicism, where the host is held to have been transubstantiated into the body of Jesus Christ, host desecration is among the gravest of sins. Intentional host desecration is not only a mortal sin but also incurs the penalty of excommunication latae sententiae
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Wine
Wine
Wine
(from Latin
Latin
vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.[1] Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production
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Paul The Apostle
Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
(Latin: Paulus; Greek: Παῦλος, translit. Paulos, Coptic: ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲟⲥ; c. 5 – c. 67), commonly known as Saint
Saint
Paul and also known by his Jewish name Saul of Tarsus (Hebrew: שאול התרסי‎, translit. Sha'ul ha-Tarsi; Greek: Σαῦλος Ταρσεύς, translit. Saulos Tarseus),[4][5][6] was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of the Christ
Christ
to the first century world.[7] Paul is generally considered one of the most important figures of the Apostolic Age[8][9] and in the mid-30s to the mid-50s AD he founded several churches in Asia Minor and Europe. He took advantage of his status as both a Jew
Jew
and a Roman citizen
Roman citizen
to minister to both Jewish and Roman audiences
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